The New York Experimental Music Meetup Group Message Board › Meat Beat Manifesto at Highline Ballroom this Sat. 25th

Meat Beat Manifesto at Highline Ballroom this Sat. 25th

David
user 5305441
Group Organizer
New York, NY
HighLine Ballroom
Sat. nite April 26th Meat Beat Manifesto
Located at 431 W 16th St
New York, NY 10011
between 9th and 10th Ave
(212) 414-5994

Electronica genius Jack Dangers of Meat Beat Manifesto

Meat Beat Manifesto's resident brainiac Jack Dangers has pioneered, or expanded upon, nearly every form of electronic music over the last 20 years - from industrial and techno to triphop and big beat.
Besides his hits with Meat - like "Prime Audio Soup," which was featured in "The Matrix" - the Grammy-nominated mixmaster has jazzed-up tracks for Public Enemy, Consolidated, Chemical Brothers and more.
Meat's textures range from starkly minimalist to densely hyperkinetic. Their performances are engulfing: Beats pound and shimmy, undulate and morph, while huge screen images unspool, jumpcut and loop. The audio-visual interplay - improvised anew at each show - can be funny, ironic or politically pointed.
Saturday night at the Highline Ballroom, Meat will debut a new CD of sounds: "Autoimmune."
Dangers, who was recently diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, says, "Sometimes I walk around like Howard Hughes, worried about germs because of the medications I'm taking. But no point in complaining. John Cage had exactly this condition."
"Autoimmune" isn't focused on the 41-year-old's health: "It's a jumping-off point," Dangers says. "The Earth's immune system is fragile. There are environmental issues I wanted to touch on. I'm vegetarian. I think we all have to reduce our carbon footprints."

Mostly, though, Danger thought Autoimmune was a nifty title.

Born John Corrigan in Swindon, England, Dangers knows a lot about nifty titles. MBM's industrial-driven 1989 debut, "Storm the Studio," was followed a year later by "99%," a techno parade. For MBM's 1990 U.S. tour with Nine Inch Nails, Dangers included a dance troupe. Signing with a major label, he released 1992's "Satyricon," which reimagined synthpop.

In 1994, Dangers moved to San Francisco - and back to the sonic edge: "I was producing and working there, with Consolidated and Disposable Heroes," he says. "I'd met my future wife, who lived there. I'd spent 26 years in a small town, my inspiration was running low. Time to move."

In 1996, MBM released "Subliminal Sandwich," a double-disk excursion. The year after that, Dangers added drummer Lynn Farmer: "He's our human touch," he says. "A lot of electronic music is one guy on keyboards or a deejay. What we do sounds different because it's a band."

"We all improvise live," he adds. "The video clips, we chop up and change 'em around every night. Call it the safety-pin theory: juxtaposing two things that seem unrelated. There's a lot of humor to what we do. Me and Ben [Stokes, MBM's video artist] have a competition to make each other laugh onstage by putting up unexpected clips. Of course, sometimes we screw up, but we like having errors in the show. [It] means we're human."

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