Re: [flyleafbooklovers] Vote for September book!

From: Nancy K. A.
Sent on: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 4:04 PM
My preference:
1.  Cold
2.  Worst Hard Times
3.  Philosopher and the Wolf.
 
N.
 
Nancy K. Applegate

From: vanessa
Sent: Tuesday, August 17, 2010 4:40 PM
Subject: [flyleafbooklovers] Vote for September book!

We had a great turnout and lively conversation at our first meetup and I am looking forward to all the engaging discussions to come! Thanks so much to those of you who came for contributing your thoughtful comments.

Many of you had terrific and intriguing suggestions for next month's discussion and it was difficult to narrow it down to just 3 for the vote. We can always go back to some of the other titles offered up but I picked these to vote among because of the degree of interest expressed by others in the group, potential for good discussion, and length (at 600 or 700 pages, a couple of the options were a little long for the month time frame in which to read the next title). We may come back to some of the titles I had mentioned in my previous email, once they are available on paperback. Remember that Flyleaf Books offers a discount to us on titles we purchase for our book club.

Please rank your picks in order of preference and post them or email me within the next couple of days.

1.
Cold: Adventures in the World's Frozen Places by Bill Streever
320 pages

"Cold is a striding tour through a disappearing world. Mr. Streever?s prose does what E. L. Doctorow said good writing is supposed to do, which is to evoke sensation in the reader ? 'not the fact that it is raining, but the feeling of being rained upon.' This book is chilling in too many ways to count." NYTimes

From avalanches to glaciers, from seals to snowflakes, and from Shackleton's expedition to The Year Without Summer, Bill Streever journeys through history, myth, geography, and ecology in a year-long search for cold ? real, icy, 40-below cold.
In July he finds it while taking a dip in a 35-degree Arctic swimming hole; in September while excavating our planet's ancient and not so ancient ice ages; and in October while exploring hibernation habits in animals, from humans to wood frogs to bears.

A scientist whose passion for cold runs red hot, Streever is a wondrous guide: he conjures woolly mammoth carcasses and the ice-age Clovis tribe from melting glaciers, and he evokes blizzards so wild readers may freeze ? limb by vicarious limb.

2.
The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan
340 pages

National Book Award Winner

"...Timothy Egan has written a popular history that masterfully captures the story of our nation's greatest environmental disaster....It is fascinating and emotionally wrenching, and you just can't stop reading..." Chicago Tribune

The dust storms that terrorized the High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since. Timothy Egan's critically acclaimed account rescues this iconic chapter of American history from the shadows in a tour de force of historical reportage. Following a dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of the region, Egan tells of their desperate attempts to carry on through blinding black dust blizzards, crop failure, and the death of loved ones. Brilliantly capturing the terrifying drama of catastrophe, Egan does equal justice to the human characters who become his heroes, "the stoic, long-suffering men and women whose lives he opens up with urgency and respect" (New York Times).
In an era that promises ever-greater natural disasters, The Worst Hard Time is "arguably the best nonfiction book yet" (Austin Statesman Journal) on the greatest environmental disaster ever to be visited upon our land and a powerful cautionary tale about the dangers of trifling with nature.

3.
The Philosopher and the Wolf: Lessons from the Wild on Love, Death, and Happiness by Mark Rowlands
256 pages

"Rowlands's gruff humor, erudition, honest assessments of himself and the world around him, and his all-out affection for his 'pack' result in a book that is surprisingly thoughtful and frequently poignant." Publishers Weekly

This fascinating book charts the relationship between Mark Rowlands, a rootless philosopher, and Brenin, his well-traveled wolf. After acquiring Brenin as a cub, it quickly became apparent that Breinin was never to be left alone, as the consequences to Mark's house and its contents were dire. As a result, Brenin and Mark went everywhere together-from classroom lecture to Ireland, England, and France. More than just an exotic pet, Brenin exerted an immense influence on Rowlands as both a person, and, strangely enough, as a philosopher, leading him to re-evaluate his attitude to love, happiness, nature and death. By turns funny (what do you do when your wolf eats your air-conditioning unit?) and poignant, this life-affirming book will make you reappraise what it means to be human.


CAST YOUR VOTE!!!




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