RE: [flyleafbooklovers] VOTE for October and November

From: Evelyn Daniel
Sent on: Friday, August 24, 2012 3:51 PM

Wonderful, Ed.  Thanks for sharing.  The article resonates with all the parents among us.

Evelyn

 

From: [address removed] [mailto:[address removed]] On Behalf Of ed
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2012 3:20 PM
To: [address removed]
Subject: RE: [flyleafbooklovers] VOTE for October and November

 

I haven't been a presence at your meetings for awhile and am not sure when I'll be back, but I follow the suggestion emails closely.

The mention of Ian Frazier put me in mind of what I remembered as one of the funniest things I had read in years.  It endures, even though I am now quite far from the stage of parenting during which it resonated most profoundly:  http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1997/02/laws-concerning-food-and-drink-household-principles-lamentations-of-the-father/305013/

Enjoy.


From: [address removed]
To: [address removed]
Subject: [flyleafbooklovers] VOTE for October and November
Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2012 15:00:29 -0400

We got some great suggestions from Tracey and Evelyn...some of which we've voted on in the past and some we've read in the past and others we are waiting to come out onto paperback (like Thinking, Fast and Slow, not out until Feb 2013).
for our Vote i've narrowed the lists to these 3 for Fiction/Nonfiction, each.
Please rank in order of preference! If we have a lot of interest in more than 1 title I may go ahead and just schedule that for November/December! thanks :)
Nonfiction
1) (with Evelyn's plug)
NOW YOU SEE IT: How Technology and Brain Science will Transform Schools and Business for the 21st Century (Viking, 2011).
The paperback edition just came out.  Cathy is a chaired professor at Duke and co-founder of a “collaboratory” called HASTAC (For Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology); I listened to her talk on Thursday at Flyleaf and I think I can guarantee there’s a lot of issues addressed in the book that would make a good discussion for us.

"As scholarly as [it] is . . . this book about education happens to double as an optimistic, even thrilling, summer read." —The New York Times


2)
How to Live Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell
Winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography
"Serious, engaging, and so infectiously in love with its subject that I found myself racing to finish so I could start rereading the Essays themselves…It is hard to imagine a better introduction—or reintroduction—to Montaigne than Bakewell’s book.” —Lorin Stein, Harper’s Magazine

“Ms. Bakewell’s new book, How to Live, is a biography, but in the form of a delightful conversation across the centuries.” —The New York Times
In a wide-ranging intellectual career, Michel de Montaigne found no knowledge so hard to acquire as the knowledge of how to live this life well. By casting her biography of the writer as 20 chapters, each focused on a different answer to the question How to live? Bakewell limns Montaigne’s ceaseless pursuit of this most elusive knowledge. Embedded in the 20 life-knowledge responses, readers will find essential facts—when and where Montaigne was born, how and whom he married, how he became mayor of Bordeaux, how he managed a public life in a time of lethal religious and political passions. But Bakewell keeps the focus on the inner evolution of the acute mind informing Montaigne’s charmingly digressive and tolerantly skeptical essays.
3)
Travels in Siberia by Ian Frazier
New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year
Boston Globe Best Book of 2010
Christian Science Monitor Best Book of 2010
San Francisco Chronicle Top 10 Books of 2010
A Washington Post Best Book of the Year
Kansas City Star 100 Best Books of 2010

In this astonishing new work from one of our greatest and most entertaining storytellers, Ian Frazier trains his perceptive, generous eye on Siberia. With great passion and enthusiasm, he reveals Siberia’s role in history—its science, economics, and politics—and tells the stories of its most famous exiles, such as Dostoyevsky, Lenin, and Stalin. At the same time, Frazier draws a unique portrait of Russia since the end of the Soviet Union, and gives a personal account of adventure among Russian friends and acquaintances. A unique, captivating, totally Frazierian take on what he calls the “amazingness” of Russia.
 
Fiction


1)
The Leftovers by Tom Perotta
New York Times Notable Book for 2011
Washington Post Notable Fiction Book for 2011
The New York Times bestseller now in paperback—A thought-provoking engrossing novel about love, connection, and loss from the author of The Abstinence Teacher and Little Children
What if your life was upended in an instant? What if your spouse or your child disappeared right in front of your eyes? Was it the Rapture or something even more difficult to explain? How would you rebuild your life in the wake of such a devastating event? These are the questions confronting the bewildered citizens of Mapleton, a formerly comfortable suburban community that lost over a hundred people in the Sudden Departure. Kevin Garvey, the new mayor, wants to move forward, to bring a sense of renewed hope and purpose to his traumatized neighbors, even as his own family disintegrates. His wife, Laurie, has left him to enlist in the Guilty Remnant, a homegrown cult whose members take a vow of silence but haunt the town’s streets as “living reminders” of God’s judgment. His son, Tom, is gone, too, dropping out of college to follow a crooked "prophet" who calls himself Holy Wayne. Only his teenaged daughter, Jill, remains, and she’s definitely not the sweet "A" student she used to be.
2)
Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward
Winner of the 2011 National Book Award

A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch's father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn't show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn't much to save. Lately, Esch can't keep down what food she gets; she's fourteen and pregnant. Her brother Skeetah is sneaking scraps for his prized pitbull's new litter, dying one by one in the dirt. Meanwhile, brothers Randall and Junior try to stake their claim in a family long on child's play and short on parenting.
As the twelve days that make up the novel's framework yield to their dramatic conclusion, this unforgettable family-motherless children sacrificing for one another as they can, protecting and nurturing where love is scarce-pulls itself up to face another day. A big-hearted novel about familial love and community against all odds, and a wrenching look at the lonesome, brutal, and restrictive realities of rural poverty, Salvage the Bones is muscled with poetry, revelatory, and real.
3)
The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson
“In The Family Fang, Kevin Wilson presents a slyly hilarious novel that’s part social satire, part detective story, and part plain good storytelling. More engaging than A Visit from the Goon Squad, this family saga manages to be both hip and sweet at the same time.” (Publishers Weekly )
“I recently read Kevin Wilson’s novel THE FAMILY FANG, which is so strange and original and hysterically funny. It’s about a husband and wife who are performance artists and force their young children to be part of their art project. It’s a book like nothing else.” (Ann Patchett, Time Magazine )
Performance artists Caleb and Camille Fang dedicated themselves to making great art. But when an artist’s work lies in subverting normality, it can be difficult to raise well-adjusted children. Just ask Buster and Annie Fang. For as long as they can remember, they starred (unwillingly) in their parents’ madcap pieces. But now that they are grown up, the chaos of their childhood has made it difficult to cope with life outside the fishbowl of their parents’ strange world.

When the lives they’ve built come crashing down, brother and sister have nowhere to go but home, where they discover that Caleb and Camille are planning one last performance–their magnum opus–whether the kids agree to participate or not. Soon, ambition breeds conflict, bringing the Fangs to face the difficult decision about what’s ultimately more important: their family or their art.




 
 
 




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