Darwin Day and The Search for Early Humans in Ethiopia with Dr. Jay Quade

Jay Quade is Professor of Geosciences at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He received his degrees in geology at the University of New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah, in addition to two years of post-doctoral study in Canberra, Australia. Quade’s training is in geochemistry and radiometric dating, and his research focuses on paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstruction, especially in the recent geologic record. He has conducted his geochemical research on all continents except Antarctica, including recent geologic research in the Andes and Tibet, and on the paleoenviromental context of early humans in East Africa. He is currently serving as interim chair of Geosciences.

This event is sponsored by FreeThought Arizona and will be held at DuVal auditorium.

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  • Jerry K.

    Dr Quade's presentation was very appropriate fo r Darwin week and he did a thorough presentation of his findings and the perails of doing the research.He expanded on the Lucy discovery and found earlier evidence of humans. Very informative and the Q & A showed his depth of knowledge.

    1 · February 19, 2013

  • David H.

    I enjoyed Mr.Quade's presentation in many ways. The circumstances of the people that live in Ethiopia, the harshness of the territory, the dangers in the area, information about early humans. Well worth my time and of great interest. My thanks to Dr. Jay Quade

    February 19, 2013

  • David H.

    So, a meme could cause the extinction of a gene, a mutation that might be beneficial......or enhance it.

    February 16, 2013

    • Jim N.

      Interesting question which be better answered by an evolutionary biologist. Unless homo sapiens were the only species carrying that gene would that be possible and I don't know if we carry any totally unique genes.

      February 17, 2013

  • Jim N.

    A really good, scientific program and the Q&A's were A+

    February 17, 2013

  • Don L.

    Good presentation on recent findings in human evolution.

    February 17, 2013

  • David H.

    How does culture figure in genetic evolution? I can imagine ignorance/ superstition confronting evolution causing extinction to happen. Example: a child is born with blue eyes into a tribe of brown eyes. Why the blue eyes? The devil of course or god's blessing. Extinction and survival into the future. Kind of silly I know, but what about it? Evolution versus culture.

    February 16, 2013

    • Jim N.

      "I can imagine ignorance/ superstition confronting evolution causing extinction to happen."

      1 · February 16, 2013

    • Jim N.

      Sorry I hit the wrong button, most of the worlds population is based on a major religion which is based on ignorance/superstition. Their rejection of science and reason definitely may lead homo sapiens to extiction

      February 16, 2013

  • Jim N.

    In reply to John Patterson:
    John Thompson's recommendation is excellent. For a different perspective on evolution at the genome level I recommend a current edition of the 1976 book "The Selfish Gene" by Richard Dawkins.

    February 11, 2013

  • John W. P.

    For anyone with expertise in evolutionary speciation. Species are said to face extinction whenever their population drops below a certain critical level. How then can any particular mutation escape dying out, almost immediately, unless that same mutation happens to arise, roughly spontaneously, in at least some critical number of interbreeding individuals? After all, how unlikely must it be that something as rare as a new genetic mutation would arise in only two members of the same tribe, much less some higher critical number? Surely the critical number must be more than one. If so, what is it? What minimum number of interbreeding individuals must possess the mutation in quetion before that mutation has a chance to flourish, rather than die away forever? If this no longer troubles the experts, where can I find an explanation suitable for lay readers? No rush. John W. Patterson [masked]

    February 11, 2013

    • John T.

      Try http://en.wikipedia.o...­. I think you may be missing the basic feature of natural selection to establish genetic mutations. This article will give you everything you need including links to virtually every term used.
      If a mutation gives enhanced reproduction chances for an individual, even a single instance can lead to a change in the population after enough generations. It is never guaranteed though. A gene is “extinguished” if it does not compete well with alternatives that lead to better reproduction in the population. This is never guaranteed either.
      The idea of evolution by natural selection is basically very simple but very complex in its details especially on how species evolve compared to just changes in an existing species. There are many great, readable books on the subject. Again check the Internet then the county library. Look at reviews for books to see the biases the authors may have so you don’t waste your time.

      1 · February 11, 2013

  • Jerry K.

    Roy Speckhardt from the American Humanist Association will also be addressing us at 1pm at Duval. Stay and have lunch and attend Roy's talk also. Jay will have an interesting presentation and you should not miss either one.

    January 31, 2013

  • Jerry K.

    Help us remember the contribution Darwin made to evolution by having an experienced geologist describe his findings from the beginning stages of humans. We are fortunate to have such an accomplished scientist do the presentation.

    January 1, 2013

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Rafaël

We just grab a coffee and speak French. Some people have been coming every week for months... it creates a kind of warmth to the group.

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