The Future of the Brain: Augmenting our gray matter for a better tomorrow

  • January 9, 2010 · 3:00 PM
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Medical knowledge of the human brain has made leaps and bounds in the
past decade. As biomedicine transitions into an information
technology, we may hope to see the dramatic kinds of paradigm shifts
and disruptions that have been observed in computing.

With this new-found knowledge comes greater control and ability to
shape how our minds operate, and thus how we experience the world.
Will these potent brain altering technologies be adopted widely? Where
will we draw the line between treatment for ailments, and
augmentation? What sorts of technologies are already on the horizon?

In essence we plan to explore latest developments for Intelligence
Augmentation, Psychology, Pharmacology, Brain-Computer Interfaces and
more, and speculate a little on where this is all taking us.

It is under this framework that the Future Salon presents: The Future of the Brain

This presentation will be held in the Little Bigs format - a method of presenting big ideas in a very short period of time. Presenters are limited to 5 minutes and 5 slides to share their big idea with the audience, then we ask questions and discuss at the end of all the presentations.

Little Bigs
[1] by Shane: "Compile-A-Child or Killing Head-Threads With Mindkindness"
[2] by Stuart: "Exocortical Cognition: Heads in the Cloud"
[3] by Carol: "Neuroeconomics"
[4] by Paul: "Know thyself: Simulating brain architecture in silico."
[5] by Olga: "Toward a Fair Distribution of Gray Matter"
[6] by Arnell: "Is Accelerated and Interconnected Intelligence a Fundamental and Inevitable Aspect of Our Human Journey?"

Please send in your proposals to NYC Future Salon to n y f u t u r e @ a c c e l e r a t i n g . o r g so we can get you on the schedule.

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  • Damien L.

    Thank you Paul and Ella and all the presenters for another great event. It was provocative and enlightening and I can't wait for the next one. I also enjoyed the dinner afterwards - an interesting and diverse group of people.

    January 10, 2010

  • david s.

    I found it inconsistent. Some interesting content, dealing with many different timeframes, some of which appeared to be in this century. A lot of made up words, explanation of which could not be accomplished in the five minute timeframe of each presentation. Some jargon used (e.g., AGI=artificial intelligence) that was not explained. Lots of creativity, discipline not so much. Perhaps more thought is warranted about what can be accomplished in the timeframe. In addition, ALL materials used in the presentations should be made available to the Meetup Group, whether or not they attended. No materials were made available. This material should be stored in a central place like MediaFire (free).

    January 10, 2010

  • A former member
    A former member

    Time limits seem to be a superfluous measure. There's clearly value in wanting to hold people to a time limit, but this doesn't seem to happen, nor does it seem necessary. If there were a large number of presenters certainly it would be necessary, but with only 5-6 people presenting (which everyone seemed to be glad went over time) declaring a time limit seemed only to put pressure on people to breeze through the end of their slides.

    January 10, 2010

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