Re: [ia-55] Version Control of UX Deliverables

From: user 4.
Sent on: Wednesday, April 3, 2013 4:11 PM
I think versioning UX docs is a worthwhile endeavor, though it's not a clear-cut issue. Most UX applications save into a binary format, which would make VCS repos get large very quickly. It would also remove one of the benefits of versioning, which is the ability to diff.

On the other hand, if someone is not likely to manually version things well, having to use a versioning system will keep it on their mind and inherently cause better versioning habits.

Either way, backing up is necessary. Dropbox would work well for that. Versioning the UX docs in a VCS (like SVN or Git) would automatically be backing them up.

If you did go with a VCS, I would opt for making a separate repo for it. UX docs can become heavy files, and it would add unnecessary bloat to the code repo (and subsequently make devs have an angry face). But if it's separated into its own repo, then you have a nicely versioned backup of all of a project's UX docs.

-- 
Ian Lollar

On Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 4:04 PM, Alex Kim wrote:

Tom,
For personal versioning, I use Dropbox's automatic version control. (Yes, it costs money.)
In fact, I use Dropbox as my main file repository.

Or if you want organization level version control, Github is another option.
It will require you to commit changes very so often just as you do with SVN.
The thing with SVN is that it requires you to manage that installation and maintain it vs. Github, which is cloud based at a fairly low cost.

In addition to all of the above, I use manual versioning via name changes.


Regards,
Alex

............................................................
Alex Kim                                                       

 [masked]                     [address removed]




On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 3:55 PM, Thomas Donehower, Dir UX at Xi <[address removed]> wrote:
Hi, 

Been reading a lot about Lean practices. Highly recommend this book to anyone interested in getting a better understanding of Lean practices within an organization. Reminiscent of  Goldblatt's The Goal (Another great one). The Book is called The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win. 

One of the takeaways is that it mentions all inputs into a digital product should be in an SVN or version control system. 

I've never kept my artifacts (i.e. wireframes) in SVN, in my experience that has only been for code, but was wondering if perhaps others have. Usually I'll just use Save As and add ...v1 to my file name and save the file locally on my computer. I'll then add that file to a shared repository where others can access it. 

Am I in the stone ages with this flow?

--
-Tom





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