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Analytics 3.0 with Tom Davenport

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Analytics 3.0: The Integration of Big Data and Small Data Analytics




Many companies and observers are excited about the possibility of competitive advantage from analytics on "big data," but many don’t understand the differences between big and small data analytics. In this session, Tom Davenport will describe the concept of big data and what organizations are attempting to accomplish with it, and the role of the data scientist in extracting value from big data. Several leading examples of companies—large firms and startup—that are aggressively pursuing big data will be presented. Davenport will then describe how big data differs from previous approaches to analytics and data management on small data. Finally, he'll address some of the key factors that big and small data analytics have in common, and will describe his ideas on their integration using the “Analytics 3.0” framework he has developed.

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Speaker Bio

Tom Davenport is the President’s Distinguished Professor of Information Technology and Management at Babson College, the co-founder of the International Institute for Analytics, and a Senior Advisor to Deloitte Analytics. He has published on the topics of analytics in business, process management, information and knowledge management, and enterprise systems. He pioneered the concept of “competing on analytics” with his best-selling 2006 Harvard Business Review article (and his 2007 book by the same name). His most recent book isKeeping Up with the Quants: Your Guide to Understanding and Using Analytics, with Jinho Kim. He wrote or edited fifteen other books, and over 100 articles for Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, the Financial Times, and many other publications. In 2003 he was named one of the world’s “Top 25 Consultants” by Consulting magazine. In 2005 Optimize magazine’s readers named him among the top 3 business/ technology analysts in the world. In 2007 and 2008 he was named one of the 100 most influential people in the IT industry by Ziff-Davis magazines. In 2012 he was named one of the world’s top fifty business school professors by Fortune magazine.

 

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  • David E.

    Dennis - I give you solid 5 stars.

    Great topic, speaker & audience.

    Only negative was traffic was so bad I was late & didn't get the book.

    Thanks a lot for all you clearly hard work.

    December 6, 2013

  • Katie C.

    It should have been stated it the Meetup description that it was required to register and pay for a ticket. I RSVPed to the meetup and showed up without realizing that this was not a regular meetup. I made a trip to Cambridge during rush hour unnecessarily.

    December 5, 2013

    • Dennis R.

      Pablo - Did you come? Did you get in? The URL which stated "Register here on Eventbrite" was given at the top and middle of the Meet-Up invitation. Clicking on it would take you to the page to pay for your ticket. It sounds like you waited to the last minute to make your decision to go the the event. By then the registration lists and name badges were already printed (mid-afternoon) to get them to the hotel. Thanks, Dennis

      December 6, 2013

    • Pablo F.

      No, after seeing Katie had apparently been turned back at the door I decided against it. I don't know about badges but you had my info and my RSVP well ahead of time. The dual registration points is what confused me, right? I was registered for the event (on meetup.com) , I knew I had to pay (there were numerous emails about it) but I didn't understand that in order to be REALLY reserved you had to pay in advance. In other words, my RSVP was not a reservation at all, Eventbrite is the true reservation, not just the payment method like I thought. Think OpenTable. But I'm not even complaining about it, since most people seem to have figured it out. I just suggested a bit of language you could use to avoid further misunderstandings.

      December 6, 2013

  • Dan Von K.

    Tom and his team put on a great presentation. Inspiring - and a little scary.

    1 · December 6, 2013

  • Greg S.

    The presentation itself was very interesting, though the hour and a half between the listed event start time and the core presentation was a bit frustrating.

    December 6, 2013

  • Dennis R.

    Milos [ PART 2 ] - First hand stories from the top consultant in the field. Invaluable.

    Do you come to Meet-ups because they are free or to learn something and maybe get a free meal? Was your college education free or did it cost you allot of money? If you owned a company it would cost over $1,000 per attendee to find them and build a relationship with them, so you could eventually meet them. That is worth $60,000 to you, if you could meet 20% of the 300 attendees. To meet everyone costs $300,000 in sales expenses.

    And at the end of the day, all excess proceeds from the event are going to a children's charity. No one is making a penny.

    By not attending you have put yourself in a position to never make back the value you are foregoing, which can be calculated in the thousands of dollars. ($30 +$5.95 + 24.50 + $5 + $9 + $60,000)

    Sometimes you have to spend money to improve yourself and learn. 300 other people cannot all be incorrect.

    December 4, 2013

    • Milos M.

      Dennis, I come to Meet-ups for talks, food, drinks and participation, and I include networking under the umbrella of participation, and if it is for free, we are all better off. I was lucky to live in a country with great public education, and got my PhD in the USA at a public university for free. I find it hard to believe I would make 60 meaningful relations with the attendees, and I am not sure what is the number of dollars I stand to lose, hypothetically. It is commendable that the excess proceeds will go to a children's charity. History is a graveyard of groups of people who could not have been all incorrect. Fortunately, New England AI is a wonderful lot of people, and that is why I joined the group. See you at the next Meet-up! Regards, Milos.

      December 5, 2013

    • Dennis R.

      Milos - We are just going to have to disagree about the benefits of getting things for free or having to pay for them. I wish my son's law degree studies were free, but that is not the case. Regarding networking opportunities, a good networker trying to establish relationships with people at a gathering like this, could meet and collect contact info from many interesting attendees for future follow-up. The costs of establishing profitable relationships for businesses is more than my low figure of $1,000. Give me such networking opportunities and I will generate revenues every time. Thanks for your comments, but I will defend everything about this special event that was presented to you by a number of unpaid volunteers. Thanks, Dennis

      December 6, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Please keep charging for events!!

    I'd rather go to a meetup where people value it enough to pay $10. I'm sure that many other people feel the same way.

    The organizers who put these events together should also have some money to allow them to cover any incidentals that come up. It also wouldn't be crazy if light snacks or beverages were provided and funded with a small fee.

    December 5, 2013

    • Taylor H.

      I have absolutely no problem paying a fee for a talk. The program was well described, so I could use advertised DATA to determine the personal value. I was excited to see free handouts of papers and books as well. Unfortunately at 6:45 the main event had not yet started, and there seemed to be some severe AV issues, so I made a game time decision to use my precious time elsewhere. These thing happen, and will not influence future decisions.

      December 6, 2013

    • Dennis R.

      Taylor - Sorry for the technical glitch, which we resolved quickly. This was a completely voluntary act by non-professional event members of your community, thus the chance for something not going completely right enters intoo the picture. I hope you got a few takeaways from the presentations you did see. Hope you use the postcard item to read a chapter in Tom's new book, coming out in February 2014. Thanks, Dennis

      December 6, 2013

  • Scott F.

    One of the best

    December 6, 2013

  • se-ona

    I registered/paid but forgot rsvp on this meetup site. Running late. Hope to meet some of you tonight

    December 5, 2013

  • karen r.

    Im going to be a bit late. Could you give me an idea of the schedule? What does the speaker go on?

    December 5, 2013

  • Dennis R.

    Milos, [ PART 1 ]

    Here is where you are being short-sighted. Consider what you get for the donation of $10.00 plus the $1.50 in fees?

    - A talk from Tom Davenport, which would cost you hundreds of dollars at least at a tech show somewhere away from Boston, which would add travel and lodging costs.

    - Tom's "Quant" book valued at $30.00.

    - Reprinted copy of the HBR Analytics 3.0 article, valued at $5.95.

    - Food and drink at the reception valued at $24.50 per person.

    - Access to a free chapter to read in Tom's new book coming out in February. What's it worth to be first? You put a value on it = $5.00.

    - Discount of 30% if you were to buy the book. Savings of $9-$10.

    - Unbelievable networking possibilities at this first ever mix of Meet-Up groups and the Kendall Sq business community. Unpriceable.

    See PART 2

    December 4, 2013

    • Milos M.

      Dennis, I may be short-sighted, but I am a stickler when it comes to phrasing. It is a ticket, not a donation, worth $10 plus the fee. All the facts you state in Part 1 are undeniable, and everyone could benefit from the lecture and publications. Although, only the first 150 attendees will get the book. How unbelievable the networking possibilities will be I am not sure, but I will take your word for it. What is unbelievable and priceless is the word "unpricable".

      December 5, 2013

  • Milos M.

    I understand that renting a venue and organizing an event costs money, and Mr. Davenport is the top 3/25/100 in various rankings. On the other hand, this is Meetup where numerous Boston based groups have events with excellent talks, food and drinks at no cost for participation, but you want $10 through Eventbrite plus a fee they charge. Reality check! No-go for me for me this time. See you all at the next free-for-all one.

    December 4, 2013

  • Barrabas

    Just curious - I understand getting a conference room in a hotel costs money, but will this be the norm for future meetings?

    November 27, 2013

    • Dennis R.

      Barrabas - We tried to get a free facility for the date we had, but they were all taken. We also expected a bigger audience than most local facilities can handle. We got some sponsors to help pay for the hotel. This should not be the norm going forward, but where else can you go to hear Tom Davenport for less than the hundreds it costs to go to a tech conference. The price is astoundingly insignificant to the value. Do you agree?

      November 27, 2013

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