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Love-A-Bull Pit Bull Meetup Message Board › Why is my pits hair falling out?

Why is my pits hair falling out?

A former member
Post #: 1
My Pit Cairo is 17 months old 80lbs and is very healthy. For the past couple of weeks he has been biting at his back about 8 inches above his tail. I dont think its a hot spot its not like a patch of hair falling out or anything. When he is walking in front of me is really the only time you can see it. It just seems to be getting worse. Is there any kind of shampoo that anyone knows about that is great for pits or any idea what I should do? Thank you very much!!
Jen T.
Happypitbull
Round Rock, TX
Post #: 32
It sounds like a hot spot. A hot spot is any place where your dog licks or chews until the fur is thin or gone. Hot spots are usually caused by allergies. And pit bulls are notorious for skin allergies.

Take Cairo to the vet and see what he/she says. Treatment might involve oral medication, prescription shampoo, a cortisone shot, a change in food, an allergy test... Only the vet will have the answer to something like this.
S.A.D. Dog Sushi L...
saddogsushi
Austin, TX
Post #: 148
What kind of food do you feed? Many dogs have allergies to grain. I would suggest looking at the diet before treating with steroids and just suppressing symptoms. Holistically, you want to build the immune system-and that all starts with what you feed.

We have helped many, many dogs with skin allergies. IMO, rather than put your dog through all of the suppressive treatment, why not start building your dog's immune system back up by feeding a diet that is fully nutritious.

P.S. Vets are not where I would look for advice on nutrition-as they are not trained in areas of prevention, but rather in treatment.

Thanks
Alissa
Jen T.
Happypitbull
Round Rock, TX
Post #: 33
P.S. Vets are not where I would look for advice on nutrition-as they are not trained in areas of prevention, but rather in treatment.

This is true, vets aren't really the best place to go if you're looking for nutrition advice. Very few vets specialize in canine nutrition, and it's a complex issue.

But it's unclear whether the hot spot/thin skin is caused by poor nutrition or not. It might be ringworm or another type of skin fungus; it might be that the anal glands need to be expressed (some dogs chew at their behinds when the glands are clogged); it might be environmental allergies such as a reaction to laundry softener or a shampoo that you're using.

Since it's unclear what the problem is, I would definitely check with the vet first, to eliminate causes. The vet is perfectly capable of saying "Ah, this is caused by poor nutrition." Whether you then take his/her advice regarding food is up to you and should depend at least in part on whether he/she actually has some education in canine nutrition.

It's sort of strange to say that vets aren't trained in prevention, and I would disagree; that's the whole point of things like vaccinations, heartworm tablets, spay/neuter, etc.--services that vets routinely provide. :)

Prevention isn't necessarily what you want anyway, especially if, say, it's mange or ringworm. (As an example--not to say that that is what it is.) You need treatment for something like that... from a vet, and sooner rather than later.

Feeding a high quality food (esp. one without corn/sugar/fillers) is a good idea regardless, and doing so can reduce some types of skin problems and helps your dog feel better, look better, eat less, and potty less frequently. So do switch the food if you're feeding something low-quality (i.e. bought at the grocery store) anyway, as that generally clears up a lot of problems you never even knew your dog had. And it might fix the thinning-fur problem as an added bonus.
S.A.D. Dog Sushi L...
saddogsushi
Austin, TX
Post #: 150
Jen,

If you were interested in learning more about this subject, I can attach some links...I used to think similar to what you posted above. I know you want the best for your pets, we all do...But, misinformation is a killer. It is also hard to change our mindsets, especially if we are so set in our beliefs.
My eyes began to open up when I began to educate myself from different experts in the field. I wrote about the vaccine/HW issue here: http://www.meetup.com...­

I joined the yahoo rawfeeding group http://pets.groups.ya...­ and read http://www.truthabout...­

I also am a member of http://www.meetup.com...­

If a dog has a strong immune system, not damaged by poisons of pet food, vaccine damage, over medication with HW treatment, then they are more susceptible to disease. Dogs get so many human diseases these days, and it is from their diet as well as over-vaccination, as well as from their genes.

I would not check with the vet first-I would change diet, check to see if it is my laundry detergent, eliminate before I go to the vet. This is if my dog is still acting healthy, happy, energetic, pink gums, wet, cold nose...

But, that is just what I would do. I have 5 extremely healthy dogs. I have been feeding raw since 2002. I do not vaccinate. I use titers and I test for HW, rather than give a treatment (that is what it is-not a prevention). HW is real, but there are better ways out there to manage it. I wrote about all of this above, and it is too heated of a subject to get in to here. I just wanted to share some resources, if you are interested in learning more.

Alissa
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