addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwchatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgoogleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo

The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › wood chip mulch for fruit trees

wood chip mulch for fruit trees

jon h.
user 18342491
Portland, ME
Post #: 8
What are peoples thoughts on how thick and to what radius around a fruit tree to spread wood chips? Thanks!

jon
Jesse S.
user 29709632
Harrison, ME
Post #: 45
I put down chips around 2-3" thick in a ring around my fruit trees over a weed blocking layer of paper/cardboard with no chips in the middle near the trunk. Out as far as the dripline of the tree with the middle being about 2' in diameter. I try to keep this middle zone adjacent to the trunk clear of weeds and mulches to discourage bark nibblers and borers.
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 887
My entire front yard and all my fruit trees are muched several inches thick with chips and have been for the last 8 years. They are growing exceptionally well. I plant Allium species in around the trunks to deter borers. Mostly chives and wild garlic (Allium canadense).

David Spahr
David H.
PostCarbonDesign
Oxford, ME
Post #: 444
... I would also suggest that you do not mulch with chip all the up to the trunk. respect the trunk/ root flare area. I would consider mulching that area (4-6") radiating out from the trunk with crushed stone or crushed shells.

Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 354
My entire front yard and all my fruit trees are muched several inches thick with chips and have been for the last 8 years. They are growing exceptionally well. I plant Allium species in around the trunks to deter borers. Mostly chives and wild garlic (Allium canadense).

David Spahr


David, do you think that the wild garlic in this blog article is A. canadense?
http://hungerandthirs...­
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 888
Greg,

I saw saw it in a pickle jar? Hard to tell. It looked right though. I happen to somewhat know this blogger (aka Butter Wilde) and she is a very committed forager and amateur chef. Right in my wheelhouse actually.

Allium canadense will only be found in spring because, like ramps, it upper leaves disappear by summer. They are grass like leaves. I have a 8-10 patches of this growing on my property. The bulbs are small and taste much more like an onion than garlic.

David
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 356
Opps, sorry, I didn't check the link...not sure why it went to the home page??? I copied the pic from Butter's site and posted it here:
http://img26.imagesha...­
Is it tough to find in Maine? The USDA/NRCA plant profile page,
http://plants.usda.go...­
only shows it in southern Maine and listed as "Special Concern" (endangered in NH, threatened in VT and a noxious weed in AR!). Is it a vigorous grower/expander? Thanks David!
Greg
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 2,187
Jon, we do a couple of inches of hardwood chips over cardboard (removing tape, etc.) if we really want to suppress grasses, etc. and other competition for a while, especially with young trees. It takes a couple of years for the card to break down, buying some time. If we don't have cardboard, we go thicker with the chips. Either way, you can plant companions through all that. Esp pay attention to Homa's advice re: spacing from trunk for a number of reasons. We "top up" the chips every couple of years or patch up thin spots. We are not expecting to have access to chips forever, but it is really useful now.
jon h.
user 18342491
Portland, ME
Post #: 9
awesome! thanks everyone!
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 890
Greg,

Those are definitely not Allium canadense. A. canadense is much smaller, has no red, and very soft grasslike leaves (that are marketable and good). It has a marble size/shape bulb. Sometimes smaller and more oniony than garlic like.

It really looks like grass in early spring before any real grass is growing. That's when you need to look. Some foragers call it "onion grass". The tops die away like ramps and a single seed stalk grows that has a combination of small white flowers and bulblets. Compared to many other Allium that flowering head is a head scratcher. It tends to favor woods edges of rich woods where you might find trillium, trout lily, fiddleheads, dutchman's breeches etc. It is somewhat uncommon to find but my be growing aggressively where you find it. If you dig it you should find the soil loaded with bulblets. Take a small portion and leave a lot. Disperse bulblets in the soil where you dug them and they will come back.

David
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy