The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Wish list for 2013?

Wish list for 2013?

Mary
user 12419871
Portland, ME
Post #: 5
I'm interested in starting some elders, but I want to get good stock. What's the best place to get good stock from, and are certain types better medicinally? The catalog I usually order from has York & Nova elderberries (gurneys catalog). I've seen some wild here & there in ME when they are in flower an easy to spot, I'm wondering which way I should go..

I recently got a new place with several acres & I'm very excited to get my garden going in my new permanent space & trying out some plants I haven't had a chance to before.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 586
Mary, try St Lawrence Nursery for good stock. sln.potsdam.ny.us
Jesse S.
user 29709632
Harrison, ME
Post #: 69
I second the recommendation for St. Lawrence, they've got a nice price break on a bundle, and carry some time-tested varieties.
European elderberry is less cold-hardy than american, so maybe that's why they died on you.
They are also easy to propagate from dormant wood cuttings- I've had some luck just sticking 8" pieces of last year's growth into the ground in semi-shaded and moist spots and rooted about 50% that way.
They are hungry, vigorous plants that you can really can't over-feed. A good bushel of manure per plant.
Also be on the lookout for native elderberries in wet/intervale areas, easily spotted in spring as they leaf out.
These can be just as good as the named cultivars. Ryan at Burnt Meadow Nursery is selling 'Fryeburg Intervale' through Fedco, and this just a found patch with some nice qualities he took cuttings from.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 587
Jesse, I ave had similar luck with expanding my elder orchard. But what we do (Tree and I) is we look at the underground runners and dig those up to get some of the root. 80-90% success rate that way. In fact, one actually died, but came back at the base. So now I have around 20-25 plants. Most were put in last year. (13 of them). the half dozen planted 2 years ago are just doing their own thing in the area across my stream...niot growing particularly fast, but I plan to add some good compost this year, and hopefully that will give them a nice boost.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 591
On Hablitzia.

Wintersown Hablitzia seeds seem to have germinated nicely for me this Spring (one jug did anyways!

However, as people may be aware, most Hablitzia stock and seeds in North America apparently come from a very limited genetic selection of Hablitzia. I may be visiting the Caucasus this coming October, and am wondering whether seeds can be collected at that time. If so, I could look for it in the wild, perhaps and collect seed. However, I have no idea what the plant looks like that time of the year, nor am I sure if seeds would be collectible then. Might someone be able to help me in this?

Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 486
Justin West did a similar trek and brought back some seeds which resulted in a plant. You may want to check in with him?
http://www.utne.com/E...­
Also, Stephen Barstow has added to his collection and has seeds from a few widely distant sources now, so you may also want to check with him. The plants I brought to the swap a few years back were from two of Stephen's sources...Scandinavian and "wild" collected in the Caucasus much more recently.
If you manage to bring some back and have some to share I'd like to jump in line!!!
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 487
This year's list of desired plants to introduce to my property just got one longer...
http://www.logees.com...­
The white maypop pic on the cover of their latest catalog haunted me until I caved and ordered one....I'm soooo weak!
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 921
Lisa,

I have excellent success with peaches. I got many bushels out of mostly 3 trees. 2 others did well but are small. My July Elbertas and white giants do exceptionally well. I had July Elbertas (they don't come in July) that weighed close to one lb. each. Although it's popular to recommend Reliance, I definitely do not. It's a tasty peach and does well in this climate. It comes a bit too early IMO and will not stay on the tree. They will all come at once and start dropping like crazy. You have to be there to pick at the exact second they are ready or you will have bruised ground peaches. They don't store well and really don't can well at all. You will get 1/2 quart of small peaches in the bottom of the jar and the rest juice. My Elberta Queen did well and comes much later but I don't like the qualities of the fruit as much. Split seeds for some reason. Flaming Fury is a good peach but my tree is small so far and hard to evaluate. Good fruit though. Large and colorful. Tastewise the white giants are unbeatable. Growing these different varieties means they come at differnt times which I consider an important advantage. I consider Reliance to be the least good of the 5 trees mentioned. In cold wet springs peaches may need to be sprayed with sulphur (organic) to prevent leaf curl. Other than that I do nothing and get fruit that has few bug problems. The skin may have some spots but it's nothing but a cosmetic issue. Far easier to get results from than apples. I get my trees from Stark Bros. Excellent quality trees and the best customer service imaginable. No questions asked replacements and truly excellent tech support.

My apricot trees are looking good so far. I'm expecting a bumper crop of wild highbush blueberries. As usual, they are looking way better than the cultivars and will produce more and far tastier fruit. No contest. I was going to rip up those nasty cultivars but have decided to graft wild branches to them instead.

David Spahr
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 922
Mary,

Get wild elderberries if you can. I know, the fruit is smaller.... That said, they are more nutrient dense and will grow better. I tried cultivars and they grew poorly and eventually croaked. No big surprise. Wild berries have co-evolved with this environment. Give them a friendly place and they will grow excellently with far less maintenance or soil inputs.

David Spahr
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 488
David, how long have you had your apricots, have they fruited for you and what kind are you growing? I'm putting two in this year on the southern side of a forest opening such that they're in the summer sun, but in winter shade. Hoping that helps them stay dormant long enough.
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