The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Permaculture Resources / Web Sites Books / Pls Post

Permaculture Resources / Web Sites Books / Pls Post

Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 150
Thanks both of you for this yet wider world of my understanding, elementary still as it is!

Elaine
Penelope
user 5846522
Portland, ME
Post #: 21
Lisa,

Does a U.S. based Permaculture Magazine exist?
A former member
Post #: 78
Penny,
Try 'Permaculture Activist'. I can't find my copy to give you all the subscription info and I can't remember whether Borders carries it. I get mine at my favorite bookstore--Gulf of Maine in Brunswick. Maybe Longfellows in Portland carries it.

Winnie
Penelope
user 5846522
Portland, ME
Post #: 22
Hey Winnie, Thanks.
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 468
Check out this brand new educational website created by Richard Telford in Australia.

http://www.permacultu...­

Winnie

Winnie, further to your post I had an email conversation with Richard Telford. As a result of that interaction, he has made "poster" versions of the principles and the flower available under Creative Commons agreement. Here they are:

http://files.meetup.c...­

and

http://files.meetup.c...­
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 88
Lisa,

Does a U.S. based Permaculture Magazine exist?

Sorry that I'm so late to this, Penny, but Permaculture Activist is the U.S. based magazine.

http://www.permacultu...­
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 217
I have started a yahoo mushroom group.


http://groups.yahoo.c...­

David
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 532
I have added a page on this site where we can put our list of resources; it is *under construction* at the moment but I'm focusing on local stuff right now and then we can expand.

http://permaculture.m...­

Over the next couple of weeks I'll troll through the history of this thread and get everything ported over. Feel free to make suggestions for that page at any time!
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 55
The Humanure Handbook 3rd edition, BitTorrent.

We just started composting humanure at my house, I highly recommend this book if you are interested in composting your ... uhhhh... shit.
Merry H.
Merrymaker
Portland, ME
Post #: 23
These are the gardening items from an article on 100 Things to Do to Prepare for Hard Times to Come. If you'd like the rest of the list, email me to attach my file on it to you, since I no longer can find the original source.

Garden:

Take an introduction to permaculture class, or read up on permaculture. Toby Hemenway's book Gaia's Garden: An Introduction to Home-Scale Permaculture is an excellent start. Begin replacing ornamental plants with edibles that are also beautiful.
If you are concerned with having to grow much of your food and don't have a lot of space, prioritize root crops, especially potatoes and sweet potatoes (sweet potatoes can be grown in much of the northern half of America), rather than small grains, and beans, instead of meats. The people at Ecology Action, who have done more than almost anyone to figure out how to grow the most food in the least space recommend that 60% of your land be in cover crops, 30% in root crops and 10% in everything else.
Grow only or mostly open pollinated varieties of plants and practice seed saving. It may take some experimentation to find suitable varieties, but the security of saving your own seed is worth it. Seed saving does take practice, so start early. Check out Suzanne Ashworth's Seed to Seed for ideas, but beans and peas are an excellent starting place. Overwintering biennials like carrots and cabbage is easier than it sounds, so don't assume you can't save such seed. Join Seed Savers Exchange http://www.seedsavers...­
Connect with local garden clubs and beautification projects, and encourage them consider replacing street trees and public landscaping with edible trees and shrubs.
Start a new trend. Grow food plants in the shape of a V, or spelling out "Victory." Bring back the Victory Garden !! Encourage victory gardens in your neighborhood.
Encourage your local religious community to reconnect with the agrarian roots of your faith. Every religion has harvest and planting rituals, traditions associated with spring and rebirth, etc... Create special gardens for religious holidays and community festivals to grow some of the food to be used in these. Share it publically, or donate it to the poor in your community.
Make compost tea out of your weeds. Many weeds contain useful trace minerals, and they've already absorbed some of your soil fertility. Dump them in a bucket of water, allow it to sit for a couple of days, and then fertilize plants.
Urine is sterile, and a person's yearly output can provide a good part of the fertility for 1/2 acre. Pee in a bucket, jar or commode, and fertilize your garden with liquid gold, diluted 1 part pee to 10 parts water.
Encourage useful plant volunteers, and learn to propagate more plants by cuttings, layering and grafting. Plant your extras, or share them with neighbors and friends.
Many unusual fruit trees have few pests or disease issues, unlike some of the more common varieties. Consider trying pawpaws, medlars and quinces as well as apples, peaches and plums.
Barter your gardening skills, or offer them as gifts. Off er to put in a food garden for your neighbor, either in trade for something or as a gift, perhaps for an anniversary or child's birthday. Or ask a neighbor to do you a favor, and let you garden on some spare lawn in exchange for help maintaining the property. Do whatever you have to get people growing food, even if it is a little sneaky.
Now is the time to get comfortable with season extension techniques to keep your supply of fresh food going as long as possible. Build a greenhouse or a strawbale coldframe. Put up floating row covers or a hoophouse.
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