A former member
Post #: 1
I was wondering if there was anyone out there using Biodynamics preps? Is there any interest in starting a discussion?
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 92
Hi Lauri - I am very interested in using biodynamic preps. I have seen the amazing results that many people are experiencing with these methods. I also have a fundamental belief in much of the philosophy that underlies biodynamics. At some level it feels like "homeopathy" for the land, though that's just a simplistic way of looking at it.

Do you know of any online resources for some of us to start learning a bit more?

Thx
Lisa
A former member
Post #: 7
I'd be very interested too, having no idea what it is. I could go online and look but as Lisa suggested, a choice link or two would help.

Elaine
A former member
Post #: 2
I recently found this article on line while doing some research. It is written by a Wine group specifically about biodynamic wines. I found the article to be very good in the explanation of biodynamics on many levels. It is an 8 part series and each piece is worth the read.



Also, a recent article in our 2007 biodynamic calendar Stella Natura called "Converging Streams: Biodynamics and Permaculuture" By Kyle Holzbuter. I am gong to get it scanned and will post asap. ....also, an excellent article.

We have just recently started a Biodynamic study group. We have 11 people involved from farmers, to small gardeners, to healers. Much discussion around permaculture with this group as well. We intend on having prep making sessions throughout the year.
A former member
Post #: 3
Here is the link:

http://www.wineanorak...­
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 7
Hmmm... interesting link. How many Cow horns, cow mesentery, and domestic animal skulls will I need? Links to suppliers?

It does sound like very creative composting though. I guess I am just lazy. I compost what I have available.

One thing I find interesting about this and many other strategies is that fungi seem to be only incidental in the process. Obviously, fungus plays a part in the breakdown of the materials in the compost pile. Then we just move one with our good dirt?

Here is some food for thought. Most of the living biomass in the soil is fungal. Over 90% of all plants form mycorrhizal relationships with fungus exchanging water, sugars, and minerals. It is not just an incidental part of the process. Check this out.

http://www.fungi.com/...­

And this.
http://www.fungi.com/...­

How big can a fungus get?http://botit.botany.w...­

David Spahr
A former member
Post #: 4
Facinating articles...I never knew this about mushrooms. Would love to learn more at some point. We walk our property and see them growing in so many areas ...woods ...fields...I really know very few and do not trust my knowledge to partake except for morels.

You are of course right about the mycorrhizal relationships... when we make horn manure it is always full of these white thread like fungus.

You can find ready made preps at the Josephine Porter Institute along with horns etc.....to make your own preps you would have to work with a farmer or hunter for various animal parts needed. there is more than first meets the eye to the application and effectiveness. You need to delve deeper. I will try to get the article I mentioned posted soon. I think the auther did an excellent job explaining the diferences and similarities to the 'science ' of both schools of thought.
A former member
Post #: 16
David thanks so much for that Tom Volk mushroom story about Honey Mushrooms! I read it years ago but at that time I was not yet collecting and eating Honeys. I lived in Minnesota before I came here to Maine, and in Minnesota I could find plenty of mushrooms without gills to pick for eating. But when I moved here to Maine and found so few mushrooms, I decided that I needed to do the work to identify the gilled mushroom (gilled mushrooms contain most of the deadly ones) that was so abundant and turned out to be a Honey Mushroom.

I strongly suggest that any mushroom lover should learn how to identify a Honey because they are so abundant. I dried and pickled mine.

The other easy ones to ID that I have found in Maine are: Puffballs, Boletes, Teeth Fungi, Chanterelles (black and golden), Shaggy Manes, Sheep Mushroom, Hen of the Woods, and a few others.
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 8
My website on ebible and medicinal mushrooms in Maine is mostly complete and will be running on it's own url soon. I do have a version of it running now if you want to look around. I am still editing somewhat but for now, this is close to what it will look like.

http://stereoviews.co...­

David
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 96
Thanks David for the great info. ALOT more mushrooms are in my future. We used to live in Olympia (Stamets country) and could practically eat mushrooms all day from the woods outside our house.

Regarding biodynamics, here is some additional background for us novices from attra (good site for lots of stuff). http://attra.ncat.org...­

Really want to organize a mushroom walk this year...what's a good place? time of year?
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