The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Growing mushrooms this season.

Growing mushrooms this season.

Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 11
A few months ago i got really interested in growing mushrooms, i got a free culture/spore print of Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushrooms) and I have been practicing sterile culture techniques and various mushroom growing skills with it. If you are interested in seeing some photos of the different steps, i posted them HERE

So anyway, this week I'm starting the process to grow some sawdust spawn to inoculate logs i've cut in the last few months. Spawn is a material with live mushroom mycelium (the body of the mushroom) growing through it, it is used to "seed" or inoculate logs, wood chips, manure, etc depending on the needs of the mushroom species. It would be very little extra work to make more spawn then i can use... so if other people are interested in growing mushrooms this season i would be happy to trade/give/sell/share/lend you some spawn to start with. If there is a lot of interest we could maybe even have a informal meet up at my house to inoculate logs.

I know David Spahr is interested in mushrooms (and knows a lot about them), is anyone else out there fascinated by the kingdom of fungi?

Also, just as a disclaimer: I am not a expert, I'm barely a novice, i've read 1 book (which i highly recommend) and read a bunch of stuff on the internet (i recommend reading the book first wink )
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 120
I have spores of a lot of things local including oysters. I actually grow non-sterile wherever possible. I'm trying to get things growing naturally rather than messing with culturing all the time.

I am going to start some actual sterile culturing soon.

Anyway, oysters are pretty easy. I had one pop out of an old worn out LL Bean shirt recently.

I think capturing local species/spores is best. Oysters are easy to find in May/June and Oct/Nov. The spring oysters will only grow on poplar/aspen though.
A former member
Post #: 72
Aaron and Dave,
I'm interested in a workshop. I have so many things going on right now that I'd need the help of someone to just tell me what to do. (while concurrently reading Stamet's books) So a workshop would be really helpful. I have poplar all over my woods, BTW.

Dave,
It WOULD seem that local is better but for those of us who are just beginning, I'd want to make absolutely sure I had the right spores. So, I'm curious. What in particular have you noticed from your experience that makes you feel capturing local spores is better rather than importing them from off site? e.g. Does it take longer for non-local spores to adapt to one's particular environment? Do they grow less vigorously? And by local do you mean as in the State of Maine, your town or your yard?

As an aside and not really part of my questions above, I've always been intrigued by Mollison's statement that all plants are 'native' to planet earth. I think in this case he was talking about importing a species that doesn't normally grow in a particular area ( if you can get it to grow) rather than importing a species that already grows there (as in the case using local oyster spores versus spores from another biome). It's thought provoking to think about limiting environmental factors and why certain plants are considered 'native' to certain areas and then try to be responsible when figuring out when and when not to use non-native species esp. in light of invasives and also sustainability.


Your image of mushrooms growing on your T-shirt made me laugh. Correct to assume that you weren't experimenting with unusual growing meduims???

Winnie
Tree
user 4058763
Hollis Center, ME
Post #: 34
Hi,

I would also be very interested in a workshop, spawn, or whatever I need to get started with mushroom culture. My appreciation for fungi continues to grow.

Thanks!

Tree
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 122
I think local spores are good because they are adapted to the area and particularly the trees. Mushrooms do adapt quickly and mycelium can be created that will do many things. Mycelium from many spore combinations has the ability to be as different as different people are.

Local is free too. One bunch of oyster mushrooms can make enough spores to last a lifetime BTW.

Spawn for outddor use does not need to be sterile and there may be reasons why non sterile is good.

Spring oysters only grow well on aspen/poplar species. Fall species grow well on maple and other hardwoods.

Sometimes foraging is best. I found a tree this year with more than 30 pounds on it. The owner of the tree wanted nothing to do with them. I have sent bulletins about when it is time to look in the past.

I will think about the workshop idea. I am making an inoculation chamber now. This can be done cheap. A large plastic tote, long rubber gloves, coffee filters, and computer fans. Also, petri dishes and potato agar. I bought that on ebay for $16.
Emily P.
user 7090277
Freedom, ME
Post #: 1
Hello all:
My name is Emily Posner, and I am helping with the bioremediation component of the Tear up Your Driveway Workshop this weekend.

I am trying to get my hands on some Oyster Mushroom spores or mycelium. It seems as if some folks in this group are already cultivating it. is there anyway that I can get some from you all to use for the bioremediation workshop this weekend?

Thanks
Emily Posner
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 25
Hello all:
My name is Emily Posner, and I am helping with the bioremediation component of the Tear up Your Driveway Workshop this weekend.

I am trying to get my hands on some Oyster Mushroom spores or mycelium. It seems as if some folks in this group are already cultivating it. is there anyway that I can get some from you all to use for the bioremediation workshop this weekend?

Thanks
Emily Posner

Emily... I might be able to have some ready, give me a call (maya has my number).
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 146
Aaron,

I have been meaning to get back to you but things have been busy and my computer has been messed up. Are you home in the daytime? I am at 845-2124.

Although I have some logs around, I don't want to give anyone the impression I am doing a lot of this. I have about 2 dozen logs and about half are logs of poplar that are naturally colonized with pleurotus populinus that I brought in from the woods. I do create spawn but i mostly am inoculating stumps and trees rather than logs. Logs need a lot of babysitting. If you have just a few in your yard it will probably work out for you.

It's best to get some clean hardwood logs that have been aged about 3-4 weeks. Oak or red maple is good but other hardwoods will work. Oyster creek mushroom farm in Damariscotta sells shiitake plugs. A $30 bag of plugs should be enough for 4-5 logs. Drill holes every 4 inches in staggered rows and hammer em in. You can wax the ends (or not). Thinner logs fruit sooner.

Things have been so busy lately with plants and the yard I have not had time for mushroom stuff much. I'm out of agar right now. I may make some. You can get dried agar-agar at Sun Market in Portland BTW and dextrose at a homebrew supply store. Add potato and you have potato dextrose agar.

David
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 151
I have the best flush of shiitake starting to grow that I have ever had. They liked the rain and cold apparently. The logs are 2 years old. Red Maple.

David
A former member
Post #: 113
David I have a shiitake question. I have a catalog from Wisconsin and they say the logs must be cut in winter, however I did call the people in Damariscotta and they say that the logs can be cut almost any time of the year. What is your advise?
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