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Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 98
So, I got this really cool metal stand meant for retail shelving that is perfect for some grow lights and plants, but am unsure exactly how to use it. What plants lend themselves to growing indoors during the winter? While I plan on having the stand in the living room by the bay window for a little extra light and warmth, it's not exactly like having an outdoor garden.

I'm thinking cool weather plants, but will tomatoes work? Anyone else tried this with any success?
A former member
Post #: 108
Hi Ted,
In my Solviva book ( which you can borrow), she (in Martha's Vineyard) had four year old kale plants growing in her attached greenhouse with leaves so large, one leaf made a whole meal! I'll check Nancy Bubel's Seed Startes's Handbook too to see what she suggests.. Flourescent lights don't give off much heat though.

Winnie
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 239
You can bring your pepper plants in at the end of the season. They can live for years. I brought a pepper in one year and replanted it in the spring. It worked.

David
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 526
Ted, if it's in your heated living space you would probably choose different varieties than in your unheated "cold-variety" space. For the latter, I find that mache, claytonia, some spinaches, tatsoi, minutina and few others are great for unheated - but protected - spaces. In your heated living space you can essentially winter over a bunch of stuff that you can place back outside in summer like alot of mediterranean stuff ... rosemary and stevia come to mind. How about a dwarf lemon or fig tree? When we have a greenhouse I really want to try Ilex uraguariensis to make my own mate, but not sure if even that will give me the "zone" that I need. It sounds like a great bench for starts in February, of course!
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 99
I'm getting the sense that I really couldn't just grow plants during the winter in my house under grow lights...? Granted, it's not like full sunlight in 80 degree weather (though, I have seen scant evidence of either one this summer).

I was thinking (hoping) that I could fake the little plants out and just start them and grow them under the lights in my living room. Heck, I'll even read to them if it helps.
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 100
Hi Ted,
In my Solviva book ( which you can borrow), she (in Martha's Vineyard) had four year old kale plants growing in her attached greenhouse with leaves so large, one leaf made a whole meal! I'll check Nancy Bubel's Seed Startes's Handbook too to see what she suggests.. Flourescent lights don't give off much heat though.

Winnie

I'd love to borrow the Solviva book, Winnie. I remember reading about it a while back, but haven't read it yet.

Ted
Penelope
user 5846522
Portland, ME
Post #: 69
Ted, I know its not exactly 4 season gardening, but for me for now, my gardening in Dec through March is limited to sprouting a variety of sprouts for salads and stir fry's. I find the sprouts get me through.

I would like to find a different source for sprouts where do you all get your seed Fedco?
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 101
Sprouting is a good idea - thanks, Penny. I already have a "sprouter" so just need to get the seeds.

As far as seed - this year, I got it all from Fedco. Don't know whether they have sprouts. You can get them at some stores, especially health food stores. Royal River usually has a couple of kinds.
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 529
I've been reading the Solviva book. If you dig through the fluff, there's some helpful information in there about growing food in unheated greenhouse spaces as well as in heated parts of your home.
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 104
Thanks Lisa. Sounds like a good reference book.
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