The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Dogwoods as part of edible landscape...

Dogwoods as part of edible landscape...

zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 242
Cornus Mas andKousa are both supposed to have quite edible and tasty berries...anyone grown/eaten them before?
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 645
I've tasted them both on the SMCC campus. They're nice. You wouldn't make a meal of them or anything....but nice.
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 64
cornus mas is said to be very much like a cherry, it is also known as a Cornelian cherry. I have never had one, but i planted one this year.

I have eaten a few different kousa fruits, they seem to vary by individual tree a lot (as with any plant not generally selected a food crop). They usually have a good taste (kind of floral, like an asian pear), but the texture is somewhat odd, its like mush inside of a semi-tough skin. The trees are very pretty when they get big.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 243
I'm considering their fruit for use in making jellies.
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 65
I'm considering their fruit for use in making jellies.
That would probably be the best use for them, maybe paired with some quinces?
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 244
Aaron...sooo many different fruiting plants..so few funds!

I'm trying to mix plant habit with fruitfulness, with flavor, with health benefits.

So. groundcovers, canefruit, small to medium height shrubs, small trees and larger trees. Then there's the bearing age to consider. Some fruit will bear in 1-2 years, while others will require 3, 5, or more years to reach bearing age.

sigh

At least I have plenty of room to try different things.

I've found one site that seems to have pretty good prices on 2-3' size shrubs and trees...but the good prices are for 4 or more and I only need 2 or 3 of each for pollination, survival, etc.
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 293
We have a cornus mas planted about 5 years ago by our landscaper friend with whom we did a trade (yoga for landscaping.) We didn't even know it was edible until this year for the first time the cornelian cherries announced themselves! By falling into the cold frame and looking so luscious I couldn't resist tasting them.........and loved them! But by the time I researched what kind of dogwood it was to be sure it was safe to eat them, a big storm came along and swept them all over the ground.

Next year however we'll be ready!
David H.
PostCarbonDesign
Oxford, ME
Post #: 316
I eaten Kousa berries from Pownal to Kennebunk on jobs this season...I would say that they have a peachy taste but with those 2-4 seeds inside...mixed with rugosa, they were my afternoon snacks. The quince is fine addition to the edible landscape as well. I also would recommend a white pine needle tea.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 245
I'd consider starting someof these things from seed, but I would prefera more *instant* result, so much prefer2 year old plants or even a little older.

I did a little yardwork today, picking up some items like plastic buckets and started picturing in my mind where things will get planted.

of course, an idea in my head isn't thesame as actually executing it....
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 285
Cornus canadensis (bunchberry) and Cornus sericea (red osier dogwood) are native and common to the area if you have no dough. That said, the fruit is survival food only and bunchberry is ubiquitous in the woods and so not in need of propagation. At the least they are pretty plants that keep the birds happy. You can easily collect a lot of bunchberry and make jelly etc. but it needs to be mixed with something that has flavor.

David
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy