Autumnal Fruit Forage around Chorlton Ees

This (rescheduled) easy and mostly flat walk will be around 4 miles in total - there and back - and will take place around the Chorlton Ees area.

The meeting point will be outside Chorlton Bus Station on Barlow Moor Road , Manchester M21 8DQ which is easily accessible by frequent bus services from Manchester City Centre (Bus nos 85 and 86). After meeting there we will head down the nearby Beech Road towards the entrance of Chorlton Ees and which is where our forage will begin.

During a recent reccie, I was excited to discover a significant number of apple trees around the area (at least 30) with fruit ready for picking as well as a few sloes.... and who knows what other forage'ables might also be waiting to be discovered along the way.

No matter what we forage on the day, this is still a great opportunity to explore a very pleasant area of countryside situated in the heart of Chorlton. At the end of the walk there will also be an opportunity to get a well deserved drink in the nearby Jacksons Boat Pub which is situated near the banks of the River Mersey.

Please remember to bring bags to carry the apples in and, if possible, a long-handled fruit picker  - as a lot of the apples are situated high up in the trees . If you don't have one of these then don't worry as I'll be bringing along my own telescopic fruit picker which people can use for reaching fruit on the usually inaccessible, higher branches.


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  • Daddy w.

    Great that you found some sloes Joanne, but I am a bit concerned that you collected so many and said you got the last of the sloes. I think this site explains a lot about foraging practice http://wtcampaigns.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/sustainable-fungal-foraging-to-pick-or-not-to-pick/. With such reduced habitats for wildlife and a tough winter ahead, I feel it's important to not take so much when forging. Good foraging practice is to usually take only 10% and in a group situation that still means 10%. As the above article states, a bird can't exactly nip to the supermarket when it needs to get some more berries because us humans have taken them all. I've been out a few times now and have seen people clear bushes of fruit or strip an area of mushrooms. I think it's important for the sake of wildlife that we retain good practice and keep it as a hobby rather an actual food source.

    2 · November 8, 2013

    • Keith

      That's a very good article and thanks for sharing it with us. I entirely agree that as a foraging group we should only take a small percentage of what we find and on all the foraging walks we've had that has always been the practice. Its sad to hear that you've been on walks with other groups and have seen them clearing entire bushes or stripping an area of mushrooms as we would certainly not do that within this foraging group. As you say, we need to ensure that we leave the majority of what we find to wildlife as that is both ethical and sustainable.

      1 · November 8, 2013

  • Catherine H.

    Had a great time, met some lovely people and gained valuable information

    1 · October 21, 2013

  • Daddy w.

    Hey people, just enjoyed my massively eye watering horseradish sauce mixed with vinegar and soya milk. Was just reading up on it and a tip to any potentially pregnant ladies out there.. AVOID. It's not good to have if pregnant or if you have ulcers! Don't have it in too high a quantity either as it can be quite toxic apparantly.

    1 · October 20, 2013

    • Keith

      Thanks for sharing that.Interestingly,Richa­­rd Mabey's book"food for free"(considered by some as the"forager's bible")makes no mention of any potential health risks though a google search brings up numerous articles on the potential risks associated with eating it.This link: http://www.culinaryar...­ highlights a lot of the risks you referred to though also says these risks are reduced by cooking it.Next time I'm shopping I'll have a look at a jar of horseradish sauce to see if there are any health warnings on the label given these concerns.As with any wild food,caution should always be practised.Horseradish in small amounts does seem to be safe for most people but,as you point out,it should certainly be avoided altogether by those who are pregnant,have ulcers or kidney issues.Hope you enjoy your horseradish sauce.I stir-fried mine along with the jelly ears mushrooms we got and added it to a noodle soup I made.Lovely!

      1 · October 21, 2013

  • janice

    great met people i would not have had a chance to meet in a million years who are on the same page as me

    2 · October 20, 2013

  • Daddy w.

    Great people, massive horseradish root I can experiment with :-). Maybe next time though if there are any huge roadworks on the way in a heads up may help. If it wasn't for a woman who passed the group I would have missed out because the traffic jam made me so late. Can't wait for the next time I can go to meet you guys again :-)

    October 19, 2013

  • Jenny R.

    Great! Informative, met some nice people and I came home with a bag load of apples.

    2 · October 19, 2013

  • Daddy w.

    I'm going to be about 10 minutes late.. Sorry!

    October 19, 2013

    • Daddy w.

      I can't even get into chorlton as the traffic is not moving at all. Can I meet you anywhere? Just saw the sign for chorlton water park, is that where we are going?

      October 19, 2013

  • Jenny R.

    I'll be bringing along a guest. Hope that's OK

    October 18, 2013

    • Keith

      Hi Jenny. Sorry as only just seen your message. That's fine as someone has just dropped out.

      October 19, 2013

  • Daddy w.

    Is it ok to bring my dog on this walk? He's well behaved :-)

    October 18, 2013

    • Daddy w.

      Super :-). Is it all still on even if pouring down with rain?

      October 18, 2013

    • Keith

      Yes. Forecast for Saturday isn't too bad at the moment so it's definitely still on....Rain or shine.

      October 18, 2013

  • Isobel A.

    Sorry I can't make it tomorrow, last minute appointment - liking forward to the next one thought!

    October 18, 2013

  • Isobel A.

    Looking f.ward to meeting everyone and learning something new!

    1 · October 15, 2013

  • janice

    does anybody know what wild garlic, elder berries, edible mushrooms, beechnuts, pig nuts, ground nuts look like which are supposed to be abundant this time of year. while the apples are easier to recognize i would like to know more.

    1 · October 13, 2013

    • Keith

      Hi Janice. There are certainly a few elderberries where we are going and happy to point them out...though a lot have already been eaten by birds and those that remain are mostly past their prime and withered. Wild garlic is easier to spot in the early summer when its flowering and as it's a bulb even the leaves will have died down by now and not ready to make an appearance until spring next year. I did discover a big patch of horseradish near the brook though. There are a few beech trees down there, too, so beachmast should certainly be around at this time of year. As for mushrooms, I'm not an expert and would also love to know more about which ones we can safely pick. I know there are a few people in this group who are very knowledgeable about mushrooms and it would be great if they offered to lead a mushroom walk or contribute there expertise to this walk ?

      October 13, 2013

  • Hayley

    I just got excited and bought a fruit picker from Amazon. I saw some apple trees in Didsbury last week but couldn't get any. Will be great to join you on Saturday. Hayley

    1 · October 13, 2013

    • Keith

      That's great Hayley. I bought a telescopic one so that I could strap it to my bike frame. It's definitely worth the investment and will pay for itself in apples, plums and pears in no time at all!

      1 · October 13, 2013

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