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milwaukee vegan meetup Message Board › Vegan booze

Vegan booze

A former member
Post #: 1
Hi vegans,

Several of us at the County Clare meetup were talking about the use of animal products in the making of beer and wine, and a few people had questions about how these products are used and how to find out whether their beer or wine is vegan.

Barnivore is a good resource for answering both questions, so I'd encourage people to check it out if they're interested in learning which beers and wines are, and aren't, vegan.

Cheers,
Jason
Dave D.
dave.dandelion
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 718
Personally I don't sweat the booze issue. I draw the line at actual animal ingredients IN the products because otherwise it would reduce the practicalty of veganism to such an extent that I would not find it sustainable. Isinglass is not actually found in the final product so I enjoy my booze without worry.
A former member
Post #: 4
Along similar lines, what about french fries/onion rings etc. that are cooked in vegetable oil, but it's the same oil that meat -- usually chicken or fish -- is fried in. Some say the fries are still vegan, but they must have at least some animal product on them in the end, no?

Thoughts?
A former member
Post #: 2
I don't find the avoidance of non-vegan beers to be impractical; it's at most a minor inconvenience, and usually not even that. If my purchase perpetuates animal exploitation when I can easily opt for an alternative that wasn't produced using animal byproducts, then I just can't justify that purchase.

As for the fries that are cooked in the same oil that meat is cooked in, I don't think it contributes to animal exploitation, as you're not adding to the demand for animal products, but I'd be pretty worried that it might make me ill, so I'd avoid it for my own sake if I was aware of it. (I'd also find it kind of disgusting, honestly.) It also sort of indicates that the establishment isn't too concerned about vegan customers, so I'd be inclined to try to support another establishment that takes people like me seriously.
Dave D.
dave.dandelion
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 719
I don't find the avoidance of non-vegan beers to be impractical; it's at most a minor inconvenience, and usually not even that. If my purchase perpetuates animal exploitation when I can easily opt for an alternative that wasn't produced using animal byproducts, then I just can't justify that purchase.
Welp, MOAR FOR ME! laughing
A former member
Post #: 15
In all honesty, there are so many vegan friendly alcoholic wines, beers & liquors. It is not an inconvenience to try & support companies who use vegan methods, & to feel better that what you are drinking was not filtered through isinglass or the like. There are completely acceptable alternatives in abundance.

Its not just the filtration methods, for example honey & dairy products are often added too.

I think veganism is about doing the least harm. Everyone must draw their own line, however, under what they think is acceptable.

Just because alcoholic beverages are not required to have an ingredient listing, does that mean we turn a blind eye? What if you sat down with your glass of wine or beer & the label did have the ingredients listed......would you be happy to drink it? with the words "filtered through swim bladders of fish", "contains honey", "contains cochineal" or "milk proteins used in filtration method"?

An animal still had to die to make some of these beverages. I agree with some of the above comments. I cannot justify this in my power as a consumer.
Mark
user 11090414
Milwaukee, WI
Post #: 3
It seems like companies who make vegan booze are by far the majority. At least when it comes to beer and most liquors. I think wine is a bit different, but I don't drink wine, so maybe that's why I don't worry about it.
Dave D.
dave.dandelion
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 720
In all honesty, there are so many vegan friendly alcoholic wines, beers & liquors. It is not an inconvenience to try & support companies who use vegan methods, & to feel better that what you are drinking was not filtered through isinglass or the like. There are completely acceptable alternatives in abundance.

Its not just the filtration methods, for example honey & dairy products are often added too.

I think veganism is about doing the least harm. Everyone must draw their own line, however, under what they think is acceptable.

Just because alcoholic beverages are not required to have an ingredient listing, does that mean we turn a blind eye? What if you sat down with your glass of wine or beer & the label did have the ingredients listed......would you be happy to drink it? with the words "filtered through swim bladders of fish", "contains honey", "contains cochineal" or "milk proteins used in filtration method"?

An animal still had to die to make some of these beverages. I agree with some of the above comments. I cannot justify this in my power as a consumer.
Well, that's good that they are in abundance! Another good reason for me not to bother worrying then. smile

Vegan as the least harm is completely subjective. Should we all stop eating vegetables for the animals killed in the production of crops? With homeopathetical amounts of isinglass actually left in the final product I consider it vegan enough. If I were to include 3rd party ingredients then that would lead me to look at the glues holding the label on, the ink and dyes on the label or packaging, the boxes that they were packed in, how they were shipped etc ad nauseum. Actual parts of animals is where I draw that line.

Knowing full well the process by which booze is made I need no label to tell me about the isinglass used to clarify my beverage. (It's put into the product to settle out the impurities btw, not as a filter) Of course I'd still have no problem with it as I've already said. Booze containing dairy or whatever is another issue but if it's not apparently obvious I'm not going to pore through Barnivore at the tap. That's a level of puritanical ideal I have no interest in seeking.


Sarah
user 12560016
Chicago, IL
Post #: 4
Along similar lines, what about french fries/onion rings etc. that are cooked in vegetable oil, but it's the same oil that meat -- usually chicken or fish -- is fried in. Some say the fries are still vegan, but they must have at least some animal product on them in the end, no?

Thoughts?

This should not be a concern if you are vegan primarily for ethical reasons. Just because your food touched another food that contains animal products does not make it un-vegan; no animals suffered in the making of your food, and that's all that matters.

If, however, part of the reason you don't eat animal products is because it grosses you out, then I wouldn't think you would want to eat anything that even touches animal products.
Kristi
user 9610351
Milwaukee, WI
Post #: 16
I'm only about 6 months in being a vegetarian, so still learning. What is isinglass that people are referring to here? How can booze NOT be vegan? I just assumed it would be. Never had a piece of chicken floating in my martini ; )
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