The Little Theater Movie and Talk Meetup Group Monthly Meetup

  • November 2, 2013 · 6:00 PM
  • This location is shown only to members

Welcome to our group. We see movies at the Little Theatre on East Ave. in Rochester on the first Saturday of the month. We meet at 6:00 - 6:15 near the cafe behind the ticket booth for cinemas 2-5. I usually send out suggested movies from among the 6:30 to 7ish showings. This allows us to get out of the theater at about the same time for talk. Pair up with people for a movie or join the general group. We agree to meet afterwards at a near by restaurant, The Captain's Attic (37 Charlotte St., 2 block walk from the cinema) for conversation about the movie, life, or toward wherever the conversation leads.

Join us to meet new people, see an interesting movie, and have a nice night out with good conversation, connection and companionship. All are welcome.

The Little Theatre Website

See you at the movies.

Brian

Movie recommendations below
(************************)

Hello all,

There are some big starts in "Last Vegas" (PG-13, 105 min., in Theater 1 @ 6:30pm).  Starring Robert DeNiro, Kevin Kline, Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman in a fun romp in Vegas.  Check out the review below:

Carole Mallory's review in The Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carole-mallory/movie-reviewlast-vegasit-_b_4165134.html?utm_hp_ref=entertainment&ir=Entertainment

"Wadjda" (PG, 98 min., Theater 4 at 7:15pm) is a story of a young Saudi Arabian girl living in a conservative world.  The exuberance, energy and testing of a young girl bumping against the restrictions of one of the most controlled societies in the world, Saudi Arabia.  In Arabic, with subtitles.  Review below:

Peter Keough's review in the Boston Globe

http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/movies/2013/10/28/movie-review-wadjda-kid-bucks-system/BGbGHBCEQdPWvS4mRQf4hM/story.html

There is also "Enough Said" (PG-13, 93 min., in Theater 3 @ 7pm) starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus and James Galdolfini in a sweet romantic comedy with depth and realism.  Check out the review listed below.

Peter Bradshaw's review in The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2013/oct/17/enough-said-review

Meet between the ticket booth for 2-5 and the cafe at 6.  Mingle and find out what others are seeing.  We buy our own tickets (if more than ten attending, ask for the movie group discount).  After your movie, walk over to the restaurant for some food, drink and interesting conversation.

We will try a new restaurant after the movie, the Captain's Attic on 37 Charlotte St.  If you walk down the side street the Little is on (Winthrop St.) away from East Ave., you will run into Charlotte St.  Turn left on Charlotte St. and the Captain's Attic is a block away on the left.  It is at the old Eros location.  The prices are less than Victoire and I think they have more variety of choices.  Plus it is closer to walk to.  Check out their menu at

http://captainsattic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Captains-Attic-Main-Menu.pdf

See you at the movies.

Brian

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  • fina g.

    :-(

    January 9, 2014

  • Teresa

    part three:
    WADJDA is a young, spunky, teenage Saudi Arabian girl who is able to question authority and gently manipulate her surroundings to her advantage. Her technique to interact with her peers, schoolmaster, neighbor boy and mother was written in such a way that it unveils the multitude of western influences that keeps Saudi Arabian women suppressed. She has a small amount of financial freedom from selling unauthorized hand made bracelets in school. Although she wants to put the money towards buying a new bicycle, females in Saudi Arabia are not permitted to do ride bicycles. In the end she puts the money towards a video game to learn more about her religion thus enabling her to win first place in the school sponsored contest. But even then she’s not allowed to keep the money and must donate it to the state. And even be overzealous female schoolmaster trying her best to keep the next generation of Saudi Arabia women in check was not able to live up to the sexual suppression.

    November 7, 2013

    • Teresa

      looks like this movie is on the Oscar track! Here is a video of the director being interviewed by Jon Stewart. http://www.thedailysh...­

      December 17, 2013

  • Larry O.

    Teresa,
    You have written a very insightful, comprehensive and intelligent review. I share all your thoughts but doubt I could have explained them so well.
    Best writeup I've seen in the many years that I have been going to this meetup group's events.
    Larry

    1 · November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    part six & final.
    As serendipity never fails, I found this article (Or maybe it found me) this morning that ties in nicely with cinema and gender roles. In brief, cinemas in Sweden are introducing a new rating to highlight gender bias, or rather the absence of it. To get an A rating, a movie must pass the so-called Bechdel test, which means it must have at least two named female characters who talk to each other about something other than a man. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/06/swedish-cinemas-bechdel-test-films-gender-bias I am not familiar with the requirement of Bechdel testing I’m pretty sure that WADJDA would get a stellar grade. With the continued sharing of ideas across countries & cultures perhaps modern life will someday imitate art found in this film!

    How will you push the envelope today?

    1 · November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    part five
    The film struck several cords within myself from personal experience. I wish I could say that I haven’t experienced any of the examples in the film. But that would not be accurate. Perhaps because it was written by a woman. Perhaps because the director/writer is still experiencing her own struggle within the country. (needing to shoot some of the street scenes while giving directions from a van, as she would not have been allowed to do that in the open. As well as no Cinema/theaters in her country) I think that what is what makes a strong this film so powerful and impacting. Or because the film carries a universal message. Although women are still suppressed throughout the world it is the mavericks that help guide the next generation to greater self sustainability.

    November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    part four:
    Other characters that impressed me were her mother and the neighbor boy. Her mom was really quite supportive of her daughter’s independent given the societal expectations. When the mother is pushed aside because she is unable to bear a male heir for her husband she subliminally joins forces with her daughter. In effect guiding her to be a stronger person and reject the norms: all in the hopes of being happy in the future. The neighbor boy really represents the necessary changes in male culture that will be needed to help women realize their potential. My only regret with the film is not being able to see the boy’s family dynamics. Was his family that progressive? How did he become so insightful & sensitive? I think it was love in its purist form he felt towards WADJDA.

    November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    part two:
    Although, I was judging it from Western standards, the writer and director was able to seamlessly enforce the repeated feeling of watching the daily cultural suppression of women and young girls, from everything from fashion magazines, Western music, nail polish, Converse sneakers, transportation requirements and expectations within marriage. (Remember that feeling you got when you watch Footloose in the 80s? Trying to understand why a small-town wouldn’t want young people to dance because the town had old-fashioned thinking & outdated expectations.) it’s kind of like that, but instead of just one oppressive change it’s a multitude of individual aspects within the daily life of Saudi Arabian women that make it so difficult to achieve independence much less the equality.

    November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    WADJDA http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2258858/
    May contain spoilers and references to spoilers
    This movie should get an Oscar nod (and for more than cinematography)
    Typically I don’t read movie reviews before going into the movie. I want to experience the film “raw” and without influence. If my curiosity gets the better of me I watch the trailer. I also don’t typically write about my experience with the movie unless it really creates an impact with me.
    The viewing of WADJDA, over this past weekend, touched me enough that I would like to share some of the highlights that I noticed. Although I must admit I was a bit apprehensive about watching a film regarding the suppression of women in Saudi Arabia. I thought it was going to typically be including scenes of violence and terrorism. I am relieved to report that my trendy assumption was proved wrong and the film was not violent in nature.

    November 7, 2013

  • Teresa

    I enjoyed the conversation after the movie last night.
    As promised here is the link to the TEDx Rochester talks to be held tomorrow (November 4) this link should provide you the opportunity to view the conference remotely. http://www.tedxrochester.org/2013/10/08/viewing-parties/ Below are links to the TEDx two conferences held in Rochester each year. I look forward to telling you more about the presentations I will be experiencing when I see you at the next group. Enjoy!

    http://www.tedxrochester.org
    http://tedxflourcity.com/

    also here is the link to the original TEDx. And links to all things TEDx globally! http://www.ted.com/

    1 · November 3, 2013

  • Brian

    A nice evening. "Last Vegas" had some good moments. Nice to see the seasoned actors having fun. Wonderful discussion at The Captain's Attic after. Good service and nice layout for conversation.

    November 3, 2013

  • Sally

    Sorry to have missed this - didnt wake up from a nap in time! See you all next month.

    November 3, 2013

    • Larry O.

      If you get the chance, I think that you will really enjoy 'Wadjah'.

      1 · November 3, 2013

    • Sally

      Yes that is what I was planning to see!

      November 3, 2013

  • Jean

    The new after-movie venue, Captain's Attic, was great for location (1+ block away from the theater), comfort, and conversation. The drinks came quickly, the server was friendly and attentive, but the food took forever. But I don't think that's a deal breaker and would certainly go there again. I had a great time even though the movie I saw left me a bit blue (Blue Jasmine).

    November 3, 2013

  • Larry O.

    Wadjah was a simply beautiful movie about people making small changes and the consequences and rewards of doing so. The Arabic language added to the flavor of the cultural experience by further immersing us in the daily life. I highly recommend this movie as it portrays many things in an adult way without browbeating the audience as to a point-of-view.

    November 2, 2013

  • Jean

    I'm going to try Blue Jasmine again. The first time I tried it was showing in LIttle 1 on 35mm and either the film or the projector was damaged and I had to walk out. But I really want to see this so hopefully this won't be an issue in Little 5.

    November 2, 2013

  • cassandra

    If the rain doesn't let up soon, I'll have to pass on the movie tonight. :( My rain pants for the bike have finally torn beyond mending and I'd end up spending the whole movie soggy wet and freezing. Did that at classes Thurs-- not fun at all, LOL. If I miss you all, hope you have a great time!

    November 2, 2013

    • Jean

      where do you live? (just the general area if you don't want to publicize this). I can give you a lift if it isn't too far out of my way. I'm in W. Irondequoit. I admire your indepence from cars.

      November 2, 2013

  • Brian

    I think I am leaning towards Last Vegas. Maybe gonna plan a trip? ; ).

    November 1, 2013

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Rafaël

We just grab a coffee and speak French. Some people have been coming every week for months... it creates a kind of warmth to the group.

Rafaël, started French Conversation Group

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