Film Discussion Lunch - New Hollywood Vanguard: Bogdanovich, Coppola & Freidkin

Do you like talking movies? Do you like eating lunch? Why not combine the two as our gathering of film buffs leads to free flowing conversations on movies of any and every type.  For our Film Discussion lunches, we will be starting out with a designated topic decided at the previous lunch, whether a filmmaker, era, style or genre. 

 

Here are three directors who came to embody the “New Hollywood” movement of the seventies.  They were among the first to take advantage of the freedoms filmmakers enjoyed after the fall of the old studio system.  We’ll look at the masterpieces as well as some failures and see how they’ve thrived (or not) into the 21st century. 


Peter Bogdanovich

Targets (1968)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

What’s Up Doc? (1972)

Paper Moon (1973)

At Long Last Love (1975) 

Saint Jack (1979)

They All Laughed (1981)

Mask (1985)

Noises Off (1992)

The Cat’s Meow (2001) 

 

Francis Ford Coppola 

The Rain People (1969)

The Godfather (1972)

The Conversation (1974)

The Godfather Part II (1974)

Apocalypse Now! (1979)

One from the Heart (1982)

Rumble Fish (1983)

Peggy Sue Got Married (1986)

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) 

Tetro (2009) 

 

William Friedkin

The Night they Raided Minsky’s (1968) 

The Boys in the Band (1970)

The French Connection (1971)

The Exorcist (1973)

Sorcerer (1977) 

Cruising (1980)

To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

The Hunted (2003)  

Bug (2007)

Killer Joe (2011)

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  • James

    What about Bogdanovich's, brilliant, Henry James inspired "Daisy Miller" with Cybill Shepherd as Daisy. Not even sure if Streep could have pulled that one off. I think Peter Biskind was right in "Easy Riders and Raging Bulls." Once they hit the pinnacle they started using way too much coke and thought they could do anything. Too bad though, Bog really needs to direct more, even though he was good as Elliott Kupfer in "The Sopranos."

    September 27, 2012

    • James

      Actually, I was being sarcastic about "Daisy Miller." I only made it through about ten minutes. Not even sure if Kubrick could have translated that one to the screen. And Shepherd is a fine comic actress, but no Stella Adler.

      October 3, 2012

  • James

    Does anyone remember Friedkin's 1984 video of the late Laura Brannigan's song "Self-Control?" Its a bit overdone but Billy pulls it off in his inimitable quality of grunginess and glossiness. It reminds me of the gloss of "To Live and Die in L.A." a few years later and the exploitation of "Cruising," a few years earlier. It was one of the best videos of the boom period of the 1980's. You can find it easily on Youtube.

    October 3, 2012

  • James

    Rockin' group! I have to see more of B, C, and F's later films including "Killer Joe."

    September 30, 2012

  • Jimmy O.

    Typoe of the week: "undergod" instead of "underdog"

    September 30, 2012

  • Jimmy O.

    Defending the undergod dept.: it's great to see a defense of Daisy Miller, since that movie was so reviled and has one of the worst reputations of any movie by a major director I can think of. Haven't seen it myself. Agree that he was one of many terrific character actors in The Sopranos. Hoping we'll someday get a chance to see him working onscreen with John Huston in a recovered version of G.O. Welles' The Other Side of the Wind someday (aside from the two or three clips that seem to be available--if anyone reading this is aware of more extensive footage that survives rom that unreleased project, let us know).

    September 30, 2012

  • Brad

    Martin Scorsese was the subject of his own Meetup Lunch. While I'd agree that all these directors did their best work in the seventies (which we will discuss), I know a number of members have expressed admiration for some of their more recent films as well. Its all about discovery.

    September 16, 2012

  • Bert N.

    The problem with the three director named above is their decline in product. I think Martin Scorsese should replace Friedkin. The debate ends with two single films, while Scorsese gave us "Goodfellas", Friedkin gave us "Jade".

    September 16, 2012

  • Jimmy O.

    "Dementia 13" (1963) and "You're a Big Boy Now" (1966) are crucial building blocks in both Coppola's career and the historical narrative of New Hollywood. "The Outsiders" (1983) is part of a sort of separately released S.E. Hinton double feature along with "Rumble Fish". Quadruply wondering if I can find a version of "Big Boy" as well as "Good Times" and/or "Nickelodeon" to witness this month. Friedkin's "Jade" and even "Rules of Engagement" also pique my curiosity.

    September 9, 2012

  • Brad

    I haven't seen Nickelodian, but this was the period of At Long Last Love, which is as horrid (fascinatingly so) as its reputation indicates. After a wonderful run in the late sixties and early seventies, Bogdanovich seems to have imploded in the middle of the decade, recovering with Saint Jack.

    September 9, 2012

  • Jimmy O.

    Thrice wondering--could Bogdanovich's "Nickelodeon" (1976) be As Bad As All That? It has a great cast--i.e., no Cybill Shepherd, yes to Brian Keith, Burt being postmodern and the O'Neals working together again. The premise of a fictionalized account of the birth of the Hollywood film industry sounds terrific. Could the critical pans after its release been a final reflexive personal burial of New Hollywood's biggest ascot-wearing snob by the less well-to-do members of the film writing community he once inhabited? I'll try to find this before the meetup and see.

    September 9, 2012

  • Jimmy O.

    Wondering if anyone has witnessed Friedkin's 1960's documentaries for ABC-TV and/or the unaired "The People vs. Paul Crump". They may only be available for viewing at a broadcasting museum, if at all. Cinema verite was the first of many genres he explored in his career, and he returned to the nonfiction cinema form with a 2007 mini-doc about restoring classic paintings. Also wondering about his first feature "Good Times", a Sonny and Cher vehicle co-starring George Sanders--Friedkin's various projects do give us both "A Hard Day's Night"-style zeitgeist-driven commercialism and the piercing realism of a "Lonely Boy", so I'm curious what his take on rock movies would be. Whatever one thinks of his work, the Uptown (Chicago) native has had a fascinating, extremely diverse and remarkably prolific career that always withstood the fickle whims of the marketplace.

    September 9, 2012

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