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Re: [newtech-1] What's your experience with Node.JS and the supporting MVC frameworks?

From: rburton
Sent on: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 5:07 PM
::Plop:: that was the sound of the Mellinger test of stickiness.


On Wed, Jun 19, 2013 at 4:59 PM, Michael Mellinger <[address removed]> wrote:
Go is used at Google in production.  I think we can say that it's real. 

Performance has gotten better in the 1.1 release. These guys switched from Ruby and cut servers from 30 to 2. 


If I were starting today, I'd certainly consider it. 

On Jun 19, 2013, at 4:48 PM, Jonathan Vanasco <[address removed]> wrote:


Sorry, should have been more clear:

I would not use Python ( which I love ) or Go for high concurrency app.

I'm not sure about Lua.  

I think the various benefits/tradeoffs of Go puts its on par with Python when choosing a language for high concurrency.  The execution/cpu/memory footprint is better than Python, but it's not as mature as the other options and has a significantly smaller community of skilled engineers.  The size of community and newness of the language also contribute to there being volumes of Books , Blogposts and Resumes from people who have done exactly what you want to do in Erlang/Scala - while you're more likely to be the first in Go.

Erlang and Scala are more mature and battle-tested , especially in this area.

One could, conceivably, use any of these languages for a high concurrency app.  You're likely to have less headaches writing and maintaining something in Erlang or Scala.  It'll be easier to get started, solve problems, and find people to help build or maintain it.





On Jun 19, 2013, at 4:30 PM, Michael Mellinger wrote:


On Jun 19, 2013, at 4:14 PM, Jonathan Vanasco <[address removed]> wrote:


On Jun 19, 2013, at 3:28 PM, Shaun Springer wrote:

As you said in latter emails (and I said in my first one), Node is best suited for high concurrency applications. Even if your application required hundreds or thousands of concurrent connections, Node still might be a poor choice. Python, Go, and Lua are all poised to handle similar load (if not more) and the former has a ton of frameworks and community support around it.

Your best bet for high concurrency applications would probably be Erlang or Scala.  Not sure about Lua.

Says someone who loves Python, and prefers to code in it during the few opportunities they have to get their hands dirty.




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-Richard L. Burton III

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