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"Bag It!" Screening (Is Your Life Too Plastic?)

Free screening of this important critique of our modern society. 20 seats available--first come, first served. It is strongly recommended that you come at least 15 minutes early!

Plastic bags are a convenience for a couple of minutes and burden on the environment beyond our lifetime.

In the United States alone, an estimated 12 million barrels of oil is used annually to make the plastic bags that Americans consume. The United States International Trade Commission reported that 102 billion plastic bags were used in the U.S. in 2009. These bags, even when properly disposed of, are easily windblown and often wind up in waterways or on the landscape, becoming eyesores and degrading soil and water quality as they break down into toxic bits. Their manufacture, transportation and disposal require large quantities of non-renewable resources and release equally large amounts of global-warming gases.

Governments around the world have taken action to ban or restrict the use of plastic bags. In 2008, China banned the use of ultra-thin plastic bags, and it is estimated to have eliminated 40 billion bags in the first year. Ireland placed a fee on plastic bags and reportedly reduced consumption by 90%.

Towns all over the United States are rising to the challenge and standing up to the oil, gas and plastic industries. San Francisco has banned plastic bags. Seattle has fought a hard fight to place a fee on single-use disposable plastic AND paper bags, only to be shut down by the American Chemistry Council, a group that profits greatly from the production of plastic bags. Recently, Seattle successfully passed an ordinance that would ban plastic bags and place a small charge on paper bags.

The plastic industry and their lobbying groups spend millions annually to combat anti-plastic bag campaigns across the country. In spite of this challenge, U.S. cities including Austin, Boston, New Haven, Phoenix and Annapolis are considering bag bans or fees. In the past year, a number of cities passed plastic bag bans including Aspen and Basalt, CO, Portland, OR, San Jose, CA, and Santa Clara and Marin Counties in CA.

Source: "Bag Politics"

http://www.bagitmovie.com/about_issues.html

Trailer:

http://vimeo.com/5645718

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  • Tiffany

    Here are some real life examples of Extended Producer Responsibility operating in Vermont: http://www.wecandobettervt.com/ “Gov. Peter Shumlin signed House Bill 262 that requires manufacturers to fund and operate a post-consumer paint take-back program in the state. The law aims for end-of-life management of architectural paint in Vermont while shifting the management and financial burden away from state and local governments, according to a news release from the Boston-based Product Stewardship Institute Inc. (PSI).”

    August 3, 2013

  • Kate

    I looked at the website for 'bag it' since I would like to plan a showing for an ngo here in NY. It looks like it would be about $95. Does anyone want to go in on this, or does anyone have a suggestion for a way to show it for cheaper?

    July 29, 2013

    • Tiffany

      Maybe you could ask everyone to give $8?

      July 29, 2013

  • Tiffany

    The legislative concept I was suggesting is called "Extended Producer Responsibility," and it has already been adopted by 25 states--not to mention the European Union. So, it is feasible. It will be most effective, however, when the US adopts a national, federal, program. This will motivate manufacturers to increase the size of their efforts, and in doing so increase the efficiency of the program while lowering the cost. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_producer_responsibility New York is involved at the level of batteries and electronic equipment. http://productstewardship.us/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=280

    July 28, 2013

  • Tiffany

    The legislative concept I was suggesting is called "Extended Producer Responsibility," and it has already been adopted by 25 states--not to mention the European Union. So, it is feasible. It will be most effective, however, when the US adopts a national, federal, program. This will motivate manufacturers to increase the size of their efforts, and in doing so increase the efficiency of the program while lowering the cost. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_producer_responsibility New York is involved at the level of batteries and electronic equipment. http://productstewardship.us/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=280

    July 28, 2013

  • Ann

    Shoot - I really wish I could go to this, but I'll be going on a bus trip to Pennsylvania regarding fracking that day. I hope this film will be shown again, because I take a really strong stand on this topic. Good luck!!

    July 26, 2013

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