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Data Structures in Python @ NYU Courant

  • Jun 26, 2014 · 7:00 PM
  • This location is shown only to members

NYC Python (@nycpython) and NYU Courant (cims.nyu.edu) are proud to present a night of talks on data structures on Thursday, June 26th.

Speakers include:

• Eric Schles Lists, Linked Lists, & Non-Standard Data Structures in Python

 Zack Goldberg Collections & Sorting Algorithms

Danial Padawer Binary Search Trees, Red Black trees

• You! (for a 5-minute lightning talk on any open source or community-related topic! We have an O'Reilly book and PyGotham tickets to give away to encourage first-time speakers!)


Follow us on Twitter @NYCPython for more information leading up to the event!

Join or login to comment.

  • Abraham (Abe) K.

    The meetup was great as I was able to expand my knowledge of Python. Having programmed in many languages, many of which I forgot, but mainly in C, I had a hard time understanding the "religious" arguments against curly-brace languages. (Counting tabs or spaces, much like in makefiles should be anachronistic.) If so much of Python libraries are implemented in C, why make statements against it. And the speaker who complained about the 228 page K&R (including Reference Manual and index) relative to the 1500 page Learning Python (5th Edition) befuddled me. Most languages have good and bad features. Some languages are very parsimonious, like "awk," but I have no problem understanding an awk program I wrote 12 years ago. Indeed, when I took a Hadoop/mapReduce MOOC, I did the exercises in 3 line awk programs compared to the 15 line Python programs given by the instructor, as I was just learning Python. But I'm happy to learn Python. So thanks for the meetup.

    June 27, 2014

    • John

      There was no complaint about K&R C. The point was that while C looks simple, it requires deep knowledge to do a lot of tasks. While Python is more complex in terms of syntax and libraries, it has a higher level of abstraction that lets you focus on the problem at hand, rather than having to build up low level structures to meet your problem.

      June 27, 2014

    • ak

      Abe: not an issue in practice, in ~14 years of using Python I've only run into it once. If I had to use a language with braces I'd be running into braces every day, so it seems preferable to me by a factor of (14*365)/1 ;)

      June 27, 2014

  • André P.

    If anyone wants to denigrate "curly-brace languages", I want to see the quantity and quality of the Fortran and/or Cobol code s/he wrote.

    June 27, 2014

  • Paul L.

    Great evening.

    June 27, 2014

  • Steve B.

    After an algorithm has been nailed down in Python, if you need the low overhead you can always opt to go back and code it in another language. So Python is great for prototyping; and if your algorithm does not involve a hell of a lot of iterations, Python is great for production code too.

    Mention was made of Perl: Perl is a phenomenal utility/cleanup language; its weakness is that it does not lend itself to being "self documenting"...

    1 · June 27, 2014

  • Steve B.

    I had a discussion after the talk with the gentlemen asking, "Other than the curly braces, what do you have?" As I said to him, I think the main purpose of Python is to not burden you with the precision of control that languages like C(++) have. We now often have 4GB RAM, 1TB hard disks, and core i7 CPUs; so there's room nowadays for a "less efficient" programming language. By not encumbering you with the mechanics of details for implementation and having lots of "sloppy" defaults, the programmer is freed to tackle the problem at hand, as opposed to getting lost in the weeds with formatting control, memory allocation, etc. How many here have started working on a problem with a high precision programming language, only to get to the problem you originally wanted to attack a day or two later, because of distractions with precision requirements, type conversions, library compatibilities, etc.?

    June 27, 2014

  • Muhammad

    Great as always. Felt very "academic" with the chalk and board participating as well. Looking forward to more in the near future. :)

    June 27, 2014

  • Frank K.

    It was great. It was my first of these. The organizers were gracious and funny and the presenters did a great job. I'm a trader with about 18 months Python experience and a I'm a recovering long term Excel user so this really helps. From what I heard, it sounds like I'm lucky to have chosen Python as my first real programming language. Thanks all, Frank

    June 27, 2014

  • Eric S.

    Hey Guys!
    Thanks to everyone who came last night! Here is info about my company: uselyte.com . Here is info about my research: (remember we are looking for participants ) serv.cusp.nyu.edu/projects/mobilesense . Here is my github: https://github.com/EricSchles Data structures talk:
    https://github.com/EricSchles/dataStructuresTalk

    Linked list in python:
    https://github.com/EricSchles/linkedlists

    Binary Search Tree in python:
    https://github.com/EricSchles/BinarySearchTree

    Thanks to everyone again who came. It was so much fun!!!

    5 · June 27, 2014

    • Christie E

      Appreciated the info on Tries.

      1 · June 27, 2014

  • Naoki Y.

    Eric, could you post the links you had at the end of your presentation?

    June 26, 2014

  • Gabe F

    Something helpful for choosing data structures: Running times of basic Python data structures and operations compared: https://wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity

    3 · June 26, 2014

  • Frank C.

    How long do u guys go? Running late

    June 26, 2014

    • Susana

      Havent started yet

      June 26, 2014

  • Paul L.

    From Mercer the building is called Warren Weaver hall

    1 · June 26, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Will the presentation be taped?

    June 26, 2014

    • Paul L.

      Hey Jackie and Anne, good news! A videographer form Hakka Labs will be recording tonight's event. I'm not sure when it will be available online but it will eventually be posted.

      June 26, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      That's great! I'm afraid I will be running late so I'm very glad to hear this.

      June 26, 2014

  • Anne M.

    wowie! we got a room that enables zero waitlist??? How cool is that? Thank you NYU! I've been to alot of NYU talks over the years - they are a wonderful host.

    2 · June 26, 2014

  • Paul L.

    Hi everyone,

    Unfortunately there is no food sponsor for tonight. Please come with bellies filled.

    1 · June 26, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi! Is it a hands-on meetup? Do we need to bring our laptops?

    June 26, 2014

    • Paul L.

      Hi Jaquol, feel free to bring your laptop but no part of tonight will require one. Tonight is a collection of lecture type talks followed by Q & A.

      June 26, 2014

  • Jane

    I'm a student at NYU. Will this be at the big lecture hall (room 109)?

    June 26, 2014

  • Anne M.

    I think the abstract here has a typo, this is not part 2 of 'delicate taste' http://www.meetup.com/nycpython/events/178398502/ but rather , data structures, right?

    1 · May 30, 2014

    • James P.

      Thanks for the sharp eye, Anne! And, anticipating your next question, I just posted the speaker list!

      2 · June 14, 2014

    • Darryle S.

      Hi Anne. I believe we met at the JS meetups. I've been meeting to come to these Pythons meetups too. Hopefully, i'll see you on Thursday.

      2 · June 23, 2014

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