NYLUG - New York Linux Users Group Message Board › Linux sys admin?

Linux sys admin?

nick c.
user 56304762
New York, NY
Post #: 1
Seems like a lot of interest in sys. admin questions. I have my own questions too. For example : certification or not to certification? , a good self study path? , any suggestions for the desktop linux user who wants to do more exciting stuff like build a home intranet with rasberry pi?

I LOOK FORWARD TO COMMENTS.
Brian G.
user 3018762
Group Organizer
New York, NY
Post #: 18
Seems like a lot of interest in sys. admin questions. I have my own questions too. For example : certification or not to certification? , a good self study path? , any suggestions for the desktop linux user who wants to do more exciting stuff like build a home intranet with rasberry pi?

I LOOK FORWARD TO COMMENTS.

Generally speaking, my feeling on certification, is that most shops don't care, and prioritize experience and knowledge over certifications. Expect to be given a technical quiz during interviews. (This is a good answer: http://www.linuxplane...­)

In general when looking for tech jobs *most* employers are going to prioritize experience, and knowledge the highest, and fall back upon certification and education, for those candidates that don't have the experience. (Largely junior positions.)

Self study candidate wise, I would say, that a broad technical grounding is important to some employers. If you want to follow that path, I recommend the following books (in no particular order):


  • Modern Operating Systems by Andrew Tanenbaum
  • C Programming Language (2nd Edition) by Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie
  • Internetworking with TCP/IP Vol.1: Principles, Protocols, and Architecture (4th Edition) by Douglas Comer
  • UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook (4th Edition) by Evi Nemeth, Garth Snyder, Trent R. Hein and Ben Whaley
  • The AWK Programming Language by Alfred V. Aho, Brian W. Kernighan and Peter J. Weinberger
  • DNS and BIND (5th Edition) by Cricket Liu and Paul Albitz
  • Unix Programming Environment (Prentice-Hall Software Series) by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike


It's a lot of work, but once you make it through that list, including all exercises, and learn the material cold, you'll likely know enough to ace a junior interview. That said, if you have no experience and no formal education, getting an interview might still be tricky. I'd say for that if someone did go through that reading self-study list, and was ready to start applying for jobs, I would personally be willing to help them find a job.

Cheers,
Brian
nick c.
user 56304762
New York, NY
Post #: 2
Thanks Brian,
That was a very informative post. I have already found half of those books in PDF format and will start going through them as time permits. After reading the preface of Unix Prog Env and C Programming Lang. , I think those will be very useful in learning the base of my home Linux OS as well as admin tools. They should probably be required reading for Linux users but that might scare people away ( more than they already are).

Thanks again,
Nick
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