Finding Solutions - RE:"Fwd: Woman Arrested While Refusing Smart Meter Installation on Her Property Tells Us Her Story"

From: Joy
Sent on: Saturday, January 26, 2013 4:36 PM
I would like to weigh in here, in hopes of diverting us from any potentially divisive or separatist conduct.

This group is about Permaculture. There are three central ethics in permaculture - Earth Care, People Care, and Fair Share/Care for Future Generations.
There are also 12 generally accepted principles, although some people have re-defined those and added/transformed them into a few more or a few less. The principles offered by David Holmgren, one of the two founders of permaculture, are the generally accepted principles, or at least the starting points of whatever principles one might favor.

With that said, permaculture is still a very difficult thing to define for most, because it literally infiltrates every action we may take, in that we look at the consequence or outcome of every action, and whether or not it meshes with the Three Ethics. It becomes a creed, if you will.

This is a good opportunity for me to make a side note here about something that I've been noticing for a while now.
Since memes such as "conspiracy theories" and "preppers" and "survivalism", etc. have transitioned into popular culture in the past 5-10 years and risen to the surface, I have noticed that these topics are being mistakenly equated with, or hitched to permaculture.

I think it's because permaculture, by working WITH and AS nature, provides a certain opportunity for sustainable/regenerative production and infrastructure that can be used to detach ourselves from the current model. This desire for an alternative is what I think brings those memes and permaculture together in people's minds. One of the differences, I think, is whether one is looking for that alternative to be the baseline infrastructure, or a back-up.

Another difference is that the "lone wolf" idea of self-sufficiency, in spirit, generally pulls more from the idea of abundance as having come from the work and perhaps cleverness of an individual, homestead, household, or other exclusive people-centered or people-generated entity. Permaculture also employs work and solution-solving, but has more of a view of nature itself as the source of abundance, and is definitely an inclusive view. The goal is to understand nature as an operating system a little better, and use it to our humble advantage, while protecting it, ourselves, and future generations. It's more of a circular, relational view than what is generally held by the masses, I guess.

And that understanding absolutely, in my opinion, requires introspection, reflection, observation, critical thinking and awareness, in order to produce any outcome that is in line with the three ethics. Throwing all the jargon aside, it's acting with a conscience based in the ethics, in ALL things.

So...
when Melissa shares something like what she's been posting recently about Facebook, Smart Meters etc., I think her goal is not really to excite or divide (fear-based), but to stimulate reflection and critical thinking so that we can better recognize when things are not in alignment with our worldview, as permaculturists.

We have all types of people on this list, at different places in their understanding of permaculture, and at different places in their own development of a worldview, perhaps, so the likelihood that we all will draw the same conclusions is going to be flexible. I also recognize that I know Melissa personally, and so have a baseline reference point for what I think she may have meant, based on my experience with her.
Others may not, so I think it is important to maybe tweak our approach to posting things to this list.

First, I would like to point out that one of the benefits of releasing an idea or article "into the wild" as it were,is that it has brought some good points to the surface.
Jerry's thoughts on consumption and entitlement are not off-base, in my opinion. And I've seen this happen with other posts as well, and I don't think any idea should ever be finite, as it puts a brake on learning.

But I'd also like to mention that it might be helpful to remember that we are all people who currently live within an infrastructure that I feel promotes division, opinion over discussion, and righteousness. It's hard not to have knee-jerk reactions or pass judgement, and it's also hard not to assume that others are as well. I know I struggle with this every day. It's everywhere.

Perhaps in the future, we could all make an effort to make sure that when we post, we are clearly offering up our ideas or an article, etc. for discussion and review.
A good way to do this is to welcome feedback and to invite other's observations. Otherwise, just posting something can be taken as an edict, or  even a challenge.
Permaculture is not competitive. It is cooperative. Perhaps we could try to be more mindful of how others may perceive our actions, and take responsibility for that by encouraging their input. Anything after that can be politely debated, and we can always respectfully agree to disagree.

I, for one, would really like to see this conversation be empowering to everyone. So I would love to hear other's thoughts on what I've written here, and invite any and all feedback.

Respectfully,
~Joy

 

From: [address removed]
To: [address removed]
Subject: Re: [penn-permaculture] Fwd: Woman Arrested While Refusing Smart Meter Installation on Her Property Tells Us Her Story
Date: Fri, 25 Jan[masked]:54:42 -0500

Ms. Stahl should simply opt out of the convenience of electricity. Nowhere on this group's website is there anything about the need to reduce consumption, but rather falls into the very broad group of conspiracy theorist denials about the crisis we face as the US empire begins to accelerate its decline, with effects on the living standards of greater and greater numbers of people.

Since when are we entitled to consume energy, electricity or any other kind, without regard for its impact on any other living thing on the planet? This is the right Ms. Stahl et al are trying to reestablish. Nothing it seems to me, could be farther from our values as permaculture activists. Smart meters may or may not be effective in changing energy consumption habits. They are a side show, and the high tech needed to support them is going to become impossibly expensive relatively soon.

We need to confront, challenge, and re-direct these hysterical narratives whenever we can, not promote them as legitimate responses to the current social crisis, which is borne of our assault on our biospheric life support.

Please note Wikipedia data below on Naperville  (in quotes, not to be confused with my commentary)-- an elite, wealthy, white, high end corporate town on the (ex)-prairie w. of Chicago.  Been through it many times.

The data on the negative health effects of cell phones is serious and credible, more so to me than any radio waves from the smart meter. I wonder if Ms. Stahl and all her friends are cell phone free?


"Naperville is a city in DuPage and Will counties in the U.S. state of Illinois; it was voted the second-best place to live in the United States by Money magazine in 2006.[3]In a 2010 study, Naperville was named the wealthiest city in the Midwest and eleventh in the nation with a population over 75,000.[4] As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 141,857. It is the fifth-largest city in the state, behind Chicago, neighboring Aurora, Rockford, and Joliet. Approximately 100,000 Napervillians live in DuPage County, while about 45,000 reside in Will County. Once a quaint farming town, Naperville has evolved into an affluent city with numerous corporate headquarters located there."


On 1/25/2013 6:48 PM, Melissa M wrote:
FYI: 
This will likely end on a similar note for me when the "smart meter" comes to town.
 Ergo... My concerns re: Agenda 21 (& collectivism, aka, "the greater good for the greater number" but, exactly WHO decides what's for the greatest good?). 

 
Subject: Woman Arrested While Refusing Smart Meter Installation on Her Property Tells Us Her Story

I thought you would like this story from TheBlaze.com Jennifer Stahl has been a strong advocate against the smart meter program in Naperville, Ill., for the last two years. The issue came to a head Wednesday afternoon when she was arrested while refusing to let the utility workers install the controversial device.  "I was protecting my property,"...
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/01/24/woman-arrested-while-refusing-smart-meter-installation-on-her-property-tells-us-her-story/




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Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
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