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Hip & Well Read Message Board › book ideas here...

book ideas here...

Casey R.
user 14379706
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 6
Laura I am attempting to finish Ulysses by Bloomsday (6/16) I have a feeling it will take longer than that though. Would love to discuss it with the group, I know its one many haven't been able to finish in the past, myself included.
Casey R.
user 14379706
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 7
The Count of Monte Cristo
Crime & Punishment
Catch-22
Jean C.
user 83615222
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 1
Far from the Tree (Part 1) by Andrew Solomon--very long book, but excellent non-fiction book about parenting children that are very different from their parents (severely handicapped, extremely gifted, deaf, etc). Good and not a parenting book of interest to parents only.

Life after Life by Kate Atkinson--fiction about woman who keeps getting reborn. Kate Atkinson is known for her literary detective books (excelletn writer)

Transatlantic by Colm McCann--one of my favorite writers (he wrote Let the Great World Spin), where multiple stories (including Sen. George Mitchell and his work in brokering Northern Irish peace accords) spanning various time periods intersect.
Will B.
user 13831601
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 3
American Gods Neil Gaiman
Soul music Terry Pratchett
The Finkler Qiestopm
Darkness at Noon A. Koestler
Finnegan's Wake James Joyce
A former member
Post #: 1
I have only been to one discussion thus far, and got the idea that many folks don't prefer short stories, but I love 'em and just discovered Peter Orner. His Last Car Over The Sagamore Bridge collection comes out in a couple weeks.

I'd also be into reading either of his novels.

"Writer's writer" and all that, if that doesn't make you want to burn books.
Michelle
user 8289180
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 78
Kirsten
user 12577949
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 1
Some more ideas:
1) There were a couple of books suggested in previous posts that I have also been wanting to read:
Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi
NW by Zadie Smith
2) Does the group ever participate in the One Book, One Philadelphia program? The 2014 selection is The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers. It might be interesting to discuss a war novel (precisely because I wouldn't normally pick one up on my own).
Greg
gseaberg
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 14
Middle C by William Gass

A literary event—the long-awaited novel, almost two decades in work, by the acclaimed author of The Tunnel (“The most beautiful, most complex, most disturbing novel to be published in my lifetime.”—Michael Silverblatt, Los Angeles Times; “An extraordinary achievement”—Michael Dirda, The Washington Post); Omensetter’s Luck (“The most important work of fiction by an American in this literary generation”—Richard Gilman, The New Republic); Willie Masters’ Lonesome Wife; and In the Heart of the Heart of the Country (“These stories scrape the nerve and pierce the heart. They also replenish the language.”—Eliot Fremont-Smith, The New York Times).
Michelle
user 8289180
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 79
Some more ideas:
1) There were a couple of books suggested in previous posts that I have also been wanting to read:
Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi
NW by Zadie Smith
2) Does the group ever participate in the One Book, One Philadelphia program? The 2014 selection is The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers. It might be interesting to discuss a war novel (precisely because I wouldn't normally pick one up on my own).
Kristen,
We did NW this past year.
And yes, we do often participate in the One Book program. We skip some years when there is little interest. But we can certainly try again!
Kirsten
user 12577949
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 2
Since there was a call for "lighter" comedies to get us through dreary January, what about reading something by Nancy Mitford? Maybe Love in a Cold Climate or The Pursuit of Love? I've not read anything by her, but I've been wanting to. I've heard her compared to a 20th-century Jane Austen, and (to accentuate the light, comic qualities of her writing) here is a smattering of descriptions from reviews of her books: "shimmering with wit and gaiety", "tart", "mocking, good-tempered, and very funny".
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