addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscontroller-playcrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1linklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Saturday lecture and forum

The Philosopher’s Toolkit: How to Be the Most Rational Person in Any Room
Teachco course number 4253
Professor Patrick Grim, State University of New York at Stony Brook
24 lectures: June[masked] - November[masked]

Each 30 min video lecture is followed by one hour long moderated discussion. Attendance is open. New members are welcome!

Join or login to comment.

  • Jon R.

    The lecturer is weak in the sciences, and got it wrong in his presentation of the problem of establishing simultaneity in special relativity theory. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_of_simultaneity

    Recommended reading: jay Forrester, Counterintuitive Behavior of Social Systems http://constitution.org/ps/cbss.pdf

    Thought experiment https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thought_experiment

    July 7, 2013

    • Kim

      Special relativity in a nutshell http://www.fi.edu/lea...­

      July 8, 2013

    • Kim

      This is probably right on target for visualization... http://www.kcvs.ca/si...­

      July 8, 2013

  • Kim

    Maybe the point of the thought experiment (as presented by Grimm) was just about how we have to take our individual frames of reference into account when we make observations about the universe and keep in mind that we are seeing into the past when we visually observe anything at all in a universe where the speed of light-in a vacuum- is constant?? "When you rewrite this thought experiment purely in terms of what is observable,you can see how time and simultaneity will be relative to the comparative motion of two observers." http://www.scribd.com/doc/150659955/5/The-Power-of-Thought-Experiments

    July 7, 2013

  • Kim

    Grimm's explanation is about perception, about when light reaches the observer's retina. One observer is stationary at midpoint between two sources of light, seeing simultaneous events that occurred a fraction of a second earlier at equidistance. The other observer is moving towards one source of light and away from another. The frame of reference seems more objective (with the correct inference, that the events are simultaneous) in one case and more subjective (leading to a wrong inference) in another. If that's all there is to Einstein's thought experiment, what's the big deal? Perhaps the physicist (Jim) who was absent is best qualified to answer my question???

    July 7, 2013

  • Kim

    Einstein’s theory of relativity is, in large part, a series of deductions from the assumption that some things are not relative. What Einstein’s thought experiment shows is that if the speed of light is not relative, observable simultaneity—whether two things are seen as happening at the same time—will be.

    Einstein also followed a firm methodological principle: that theories
    must be written in terms of what is observable. When you rewrite this thought experiment purely in terms of what is observable,you can see how time and simultaneity will be relative to the
    comparative motion of two observers. That is the intuition at the core of Einstein’s theory of special relativity.

    In the 257 page course guidebook: http://www.scribd.com/doc/150659955/5/The-Power-of-Thought-Experiments

    July 7, 2013

  • Kim

    Here’s a thought experiment that was crucial in the development of Einstein’s theory of relativity. Just as he was a master of visualization, Einstein was a master of the thought experiment.

    Suppose a train car is moving along a track, with Mike in the middle of the car. He passes Fred, who is standing on the platform.We assume that the speed of light is a constant. Bolts of lightning hit both ends of the train car. The light from the two bolts reaches Fred at the same time. He sees them hit simultaneously.

    What does Mike see, in the middle of the car? The car is moving toward one lightning bolt, running up to and meeting the light coming from it. Thus, Mike, in the middle of the car, will intersect
    light from that bolt first. The car is running away from the other
    bolt, adding distance for the light from it to travel. That light won’t reach Mike until a little later. From Mike’s perspective in the moving train, the bolt at the front of the train hits before the one at the back.

    July 7, 2013

  • Ken

    Interesting.

    July 7, 2013

9 went

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy