align-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcamerachatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-crosscrosseditfacebookglobegoogleimagesinstagramlocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartwitteryahoo

Orson

Location:

Denver, CO
Hometown: Denver area

Member since:

December 27, 2006

Networks

Do you have any pet philosophical issues? (Examples: feminism, free will vs. determinism, mind/body dualism, existence of God)?

Philosophy of science and religion. Applied ethics, I think, ought to be well-settled by now - albeit settled against conventional wisdom. Political philosophy and great thinkers.

Who is your favorite philosopher?

Nietzsche, Karl Popper. Mostly I follow his smartest students like Alan Chalmers, Mark Notturno, W. W. Bartley, Jr., Ian Jarvie, Byan Magee, David Miller, and Rafe Champion. Amateur philosopher George H Smith in religion, as well as that assiduous Nietzsche scholar and thinker about world religion - critic of the analytic tradition, Walter A. Kaufmann. Aristotle, Epicurus, Voltaire, Locke. More recently, Stephen Hicks, Tibor Machan, Daniel Dennett and John Passmore. As an undergraduate, I studied political philosophy: Mulford Q Sibley (pacifist Quaker, Marxist), whose textbook is still in print in India; Terrence Ball (Great Society liberal) for Machiavellii & Hobbes, now at ASU, co-author of the now classic standard textbook "Political Ideologies and the Democratic Ideal" 8/e; Mary Dietz, then fresh from Cal-Berkeley, Northwestern Univ. Her lectures on Ancient political phil were suffused with Popper via Bartley; Kenneth Minogue, (Aristotelian conservative-libertarian), LSE emeritus.

Do you have an academic philosophy degree and if so, from which school?

When I started my undergraduate work, boring positivism still ruled the roost. Thus, my interests were pushed into history and intellectual history because these academics took real humans - and the human experience - seriously, instead of airy intuition put to "serious" purpose. So, no. Although me and most of my grad school bonded buddies took major interests in the history of philosophy. Even more recent friends in academe continue to do so. Some went into applied philosophy, eg SEE Dr. Diana Hsieh's blog http://www.dianahsieh.com/

Introduction

I was once a student of "World's Most Famous atheist," Antony Flew. And also of Sir Anthony Kenny - a dissenting ordained priest, eventually turned agnostic in the past decade. Sometimes active with Objectivist groups as student, and now as an adult.

What Orson is saying about this Meetup Group

Be square AND be there.


Member of 87 other Meetups

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy