Photography Projects and Goals

  • May 19, 2014 · 7:00 PM
  • Visions By Baker

Hello Photo Folks!

Let's talk goals for 2013...Think about your goals in this way...

Specific

Measurable

Attainable

Realistic

Timely

Smart Goals

Specific - A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal. To set a specific goal you must answer the six "W" questions:

*Who: Who is involved?

*What: What do I want to accomplish?

*Where: Identify a location.

*When: Establish a time frame.

*Which: Identify requirements and constraints.

*Why: Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal.

EXAMPLE: A general goal would be, "Get in shape." But a specific goal would say, "Join a health club and workout 3 days a week."

Smart Goals

Measurable - Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of each goal you set. When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates, and experience the exhilaration of achievement that spurs you on to continued effort required to reach your goal.

To determine if your goal is measurable, ask questions such as......How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished?

Attainable - When you identify goals that are most important to you, you begin to figure out ways you can make them come true. You develop the attitudes, abilities, skills, and financial capacity to reach them. You begin seeing previously overlooked opportunities to bring yourself closer to the achievement of your goals.

You can attain most any goal you set when you plan your steps wisely and establish a time frame that allows you to carry out those steps. Goals that may have seemed far away and out of reach eventually move closer and become attainable, not because your goals shrink, but because you grow and expand to match them. When you list your goals you build your self-image. You see yourself as worthy of these goals, and develop the traits and personality that allow you to possess them.

Realistic - To be realistic, a goal must represent an objective toward which you are both willing and able to work. A goal can be both high and realistic; you are the only one who can decide just how high your goal should be. But be sure that every goal represents substantial progress. A high goal is frequently easier to reach than a low one because a low goal exerts low motivational force. Some of the hardest jobs you ever accomplished actually seem easy simply because they were a labor of love.

Your goal is probably realistic if you truly believe that it can be accomplished. Additional ways to know if your goal is realistic is to determine if you have accomplished anything similar in the past or ask yourself what conditions would have to exist to accomplish this goal.

Timely - A goal should be grounded within a time frame. With no time frame tied to it there's no sense of urgency. If you want to lose 10 lbs, when do you want to lose it by? "Someday" won't work. But if you anchor it within a timeframe, "by May 1st", then you've set your unconscious mind into motion to begin working on the goal.

T can also stand for Tangible - A goal is tangible when you can experience it with one of the senses, that is, taste, touch, smell, sight or hearing. When your goal is tangible you have a better chance of making it specific and measurable and thus attainable.

This is what we will be covering int he first meeting. A worksheet is provided in the file section of this meet up site. please download it and fill it out. You will need to give me a copy at the meeting. So please be prepared.

Cheers,

Donna

Note about this group:

Be on time

Be committed

Be honest

Be supportive

Be creative

Be an active participant

Don't be embarrassed

Don't be afraid to share

Don't hold back

Don't judge

Check your ego at the door

Everything must be held in strict confidence

Each member must be accountable to the group

Expect greatness from each other

 

 

 

Join or login to comment.

  • Sharon F.

    Thanks for the advice and encouragement! Much needed and always appreciated :)

    May 20

  • Donna D.

    This group is dwindling fast! Come on guys- time to recommit to those goals you started out with!

    May 20

  • Donna D.

    11. Break projects into bite-sized pieces.
    Taking a task on in one entire lump can be exhausting and provide little room for rest in between. Breaking up your projects into set chunks with their own deadlines provides a much healthier, and easier, way of completing a large project:

    The default take on deadlines is typically to consider them to be cumbersome and stressful. Yet, from another perspective, a deadline can be viewed as a huge benefit to any project. Without the urgency of a hard deadline pushing a project to completion, it’s easy for you to lose focus. We’ve all worked on agonizing projects where the timeline just bleeds on and on, merely because the flexibility is there…

    It turns out that the manner in which a task is presented to someone – or the way in which you present it to your brain – has a significant impact on how motivated you will be to take action. http://99u.com/articles/7051/cant-start-wont-start-tricks-for-overcoming-procrastination

    May 18

  • Monica

    Sorry I'll miss this month. I'm making progress, took another workshop last Saturday. See you in June!

    May 6

5 went

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