addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1linklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

New Meetup: The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe's Hidde

From: Tim
Sent on: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:50 AM
Announcing a new Meetup for Bay Area Physics and Astronomy Society!

What: The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe's Hidde

When: Wednesday, February 9,[masked]:30 PM

Where: William Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Talk by S.T. Yau based on his book "The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe?s Hidden Dimensions".

=============================

From Amazon.com :

AUTHORS' STATEMENT by SHING-TUNG YAU and STEVE NADIS
There is a certain irony running through this book that one of the smallest things you can possibly imagine--six-dimensional geometric spaces that may be more than a trillion times smaller than an electron--could, nevertheless, be one of the defining features of our universe, exerting a profound influence that extends to every single point in the cosmos. This book is, in many ways, the story of those spaces, which physicists have dubbed "Calabi-Yau manifolds." It tells how one of us, Yau, managed to prove the existence, mathematically, of those spaces, despite the fact that he had originally set out to prove that such spaces could not possibly exist. It then goes on to explain how this mathematical proof, which had initially been ignored by physicists (partly because it was steeped in difficult, nonlinear arguments), nevertheless made its way into the center of string theory, which now stands as the leading theory of the universe and our best hope yet of unifying all the particles and forces observed--and yet to be observed--in nature.

Of course, none of this could have been foretold more than a half century ago when a man named Eugenio Calabi--the first half of the Calabi-Yau duo--proposed that there could be multidimensional spaces with properties so special that many mathematicians, including one of this book's authors, considered them "too good to be true." Calabi had not been thinking about physics at the time, in the early 1950s, when he advanced the famous conjecture named after him. Following the proof of the Calabi conjecture, we have learned many new and wonderful things in both physics and mathematics--all of which suggest that Calabi-Yau spaces are not only too good to be true, as the skeptics used to say, but that they may be even better.

RSVP to this Meetup:
http://www.meetup.com/physicists/calendar/15732911/

Our Sponsors

  • Nightwatch

    A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe

  • QuestBridge

    Connecting the nation's brightest low-income students with universities.

  • Turn Left at Orion

    Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Telescope and How to Find Them

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy