The Pittsburgh Vegan Meetup Message Board › Q&A on becoming vegan

Q&A on becoming vegan

A former member
Post #: 64


And, I agree, Mike Elliot is an amazing wealth of healthy vegan information. I think he's great!


yeah that!

smile

mike was my first vegan friend! he'll always have a special place in my heart.

awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!

biggrin
Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Irwin, PA
Post #: 533


And, I agree, Mike Elliot is an amazing wealth of healthy vegan information. I think he's great!


yeah that!

smile

mike was my first vegan friend! he'll always have a special place in my heart.

awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!

biggrin

Thanks folks!

-Mike
Sally
Strawberry_Sal
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 263
I see women (men, too) on an almost daily basis take that first sip of diet coke and sigh. That's addictive behavior.

There's also some evidence that the body's response to these artificial sweeteners is not that different from consuming regular sugar. Sugar can be just as addictive for some individuals. I believe my husband has a sugar addiction, which he refuses to acknowledge. He says he doesn't have that much (he does) and that he doesn't need it. Sounds like addict talk, eh? He tried doing the South Beach diet a while back and the first two weeks is complete cold turkey detox from sugar. Found out he was still putting it in his coffee (and he uses about a tablespoon full per cup, 3-4 cups/day). If we run out of desserts in the house, he gets very agitated and frustrated. He's been known to go into the baking supplies and eat chocolate chips when desperate. Says it's only chocolate not sugar, but he likes heavily sweetened milk chocolate products. To me, it's more about the sugar.

The non-sugar sweeteners I regularly use are agave, stevia yacon syrup, and sometimes xylitol (it sounds chemical, but it's actually a natural sugar alcohol - remember though, dogs cannot metabolize it and it's poison to them!). In smoothies I often use dates to sweeten. I can eat sugar without causes a lot of problems, but I do better when I don't. I don't really like the way it makes me feel, but I do like things that are made with sugar, so sometimes I indulge a bit. Fortunately, I'm limited to around 15 g/serving or I get really, really sick, so it's sort of forced compliance :o)

Sally
Jessica
user 6753798
Leechburg, PA
Post #: 32
We use agave on our waffles and pancakes instead of maple syurp. My husband has made chocolate chip cookies using agave instead of sugar and I also make a pretty good agave-dijion dressing (its got a sweet-tangy taste to it.)

Ps: I'm also addicted to sugar. Any suggestions?
Sally
Strawberry_Sal
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 264
The only thing I've heard of that works for a true sugar addiction is to go cold turkey and never have it again. It seems that a small amount of sugar will set off the craving/addiction cycle again in some individuals who are sensitive, so it has to be completely avoided.

And we're talking about refined sugar, not the natural sugars that occur in whole fruits and veggies, though some people avoid the ones higher in sugar because they either need to or just to be on the safe side. There are a lot of other options for sweetening, so there are ways to still have treats without falling off the sugar-free wagon. Things like agave, yacon syrup, stevia - all sweeten without messing with the body's insulin response (though agave is more questionable than the other two - I've seen some conflicting reports about it's glycemic response, so hard to be 100% sure).

Sally
Michael H.
MichaelHobson
Washington, PA
Post #: 333
I only have trouble with sugar when my overall diet is lacking, which can get in to a vicious cycle. The more sugar/junk I eat, the less good food I eat, the more I still want to eat...

The only cure I have found is good healthy food, mostly in the form of whole grains, beans and abundant vegetables at as many meals as possible. At the first sign of a sugar craving I'll have some fruit, fresh, canned or dried doesn't matter.

With a healthy diet in place, there is no problem with the occassional donut, brownie or giant bowl of ice cream without hitting that downward spiral.
Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Irwin, PA
Post #: 535
We use agave on our waffles and pancakes instead of maple syurp. My husband has made chocolate chip cookies using agave instead of sugar and I also make a pretty good agave-dijion dressing (its got a sweet-tangy taste to it.)

Ps: I'm also addicted to sugar. Any suggestions?

As a recovering sugar addict, I have several suggestions. First look at the Candida Questionaire from The Yest Connection Handbook. People who have an inordinate amound of yeast (candida albicans) in their body crave sugar (or things that are quickly metabolized into sugar like white bread). If you find that you have a yeast problem, then following the suggestions in the book and/or working with a healthcare provider who understands this issue (many don't) can really improve this.

Certainly abstaining from highly glycemic foods (foods which quickly raise your blood sugar levels, e.g. white sugar, white flour, white potatoes, etc) would be a good idea in dealing with the addiction. However, that is like telling an alcoholic that it would be a good idea to stop drinking. If it were really that simple, there wouldn't be many addicts in the world.

For myself, I avoid highly glycemic foods and work a twelve step recovery program through Overeaters Anonymous. By working this program, I have lost 145 pounds and feel much healthier and saner than when I was in my active addiction. There is also another 12 step program for this called Food Addicts Anonymous which is similar although they don't have a very large presence in Pittsburgh.

Feel free to email me if you want to discuss this in any more detail.

-Mike
Patrick
Herbivorous
Leechburg, PA
Post #: 53
People who have an inordinate amound of yeast (candida albicans) in their body crave sugar (or things that are quickly metabolized into sugar like white bread). If you find that you have a yeast problem, then following the suggestions in the book and/or working with a healthcare provider who understands this issue (many don't) can really improve this.

This is sage, Mike. I really think that the yeast issue is probably one of the most important ones to note. I've been eating raw vegan foods for a year now and the combination of sugar / yeast was a pretty difficult cycle to break out of. Evidence shows that when you have too much (I think any) yeast, then you crave sugar to feed the yeast and end your metabolic cycle. Unfortunately, when your stomach is empty, you tend to follow the same cycle of addiction all over again.

I think overall, if you're eating as many fruits and vegetables as possible, with the addition of whole grains (wheat berries are awesome added to fresh berries), then you're getting all the nutrition your body can absorb.

I've also noticed that while agave syrup has a lower glycemic index than sugar, it still spikes my resting heart rate. The more in tune we are with nature, the better our natural reflexes.
Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Irwin, PA
Post #: 824

I've also noticed that while agave syrup has a lower glycemic index than sugar, it still spikes my resting heart rate. The more in tune we are with nature, the better our natural reflexes.

I still use agave on occasions, but I am finding that it isn't a good choice for me either. I think the moral of the story is that we need to be getting our nutrition from whole food sources.

-Mike
Kathy M.
user 3689303
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 55
today's market in oakmont and right by nature in the strip.
Powered by mvnForum

This Meetup is community funded

$1.50/year

Member dues are used to:
  • Cover Meetup costs
  • Have a reserve fund
  • Provide supplies or equipment

Voluntary

Members are not required to pay dues, but are encouraged to chip in.

Cancel dues at any time.

Dues are billed each year.

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy