The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Source for organic compost/loam?

Source for organic compost/loam?

zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 43
Thanks for that link Dave.

I contacted them by phone just now.

Their delivery is $80, so you really want to get a lot of compost to make it worth the charge. $30/yard for the shellfish compost, $25 for their non certified organic compost with a 5 yard minimum.

So, for me to have my 15 yards delivered will run me around $560. More than I wanted to pay, but at least I know it's a good quality organic compost.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 44
I just contacted Ossipee Trail Garden Center, and they said they like Bensen's compost better and apparently, while Bensen's isn't certified as organic, they do test it and that there is no municipal sludge or anything like that in it. Mostly it's composted yard waste...leaves, mostly as well as shellfish, etc. But that makes me wonder...how to ensure the yard waste doesn't have pesticide residues in it. Be that as it may, Bensen's is $25 and delivery is free, I think, with a minimum order. Ossipee has 15 straw bales left @ 6.25/bale.

Sorry if this is a little off topic.
Lori P.
LoriPower
Portland, ME
Post #: 7
Thanks for doing the research!
Tree
user 4058763
Hollis Center, ME
Post #: 31
Hi,

I just wanted to add that three MOFGA farmers I talked to recommended Benson's compost very highly. They like it better than Winterwood.

Thanks,

Tree
A former member
Post #: 94
We are exploring an integrated bio-refinery and the problem of heavy metals, metabolic agents---latest scary thing in drinking water, and zillions of other toxics came up in designing a composting 'after-market'....i.e. after the sludge and organic trash goes through bio-digester it can be composted after seperating liquid from solids.

Composting the solids raises the potential hazards problem...there are people in Brunswick who freak out if they find 1 part of mercury in a billion parts of something else.

The solution may be custom designed microbial, aquatic plant and algael 'filters'. I kinda like oyster beds; even if you can't eat them.

Some organic materials concentrate toxics, i.e. like bottom feeding fish will take in mercury and lead; so I guess if you want that high degree of assurance; you'll have to test your source of compost.

I'm a bit concerned about the Endocrine chemicals which, even in minute quantities can affect body functions; I guess even 'ORGANIC' isn't safe any more.
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 22
Frank,

Do you know of any organic compost that is available in the Brunswick area (or within a radius of about 30 miles)? I need about 5 cubic yards.

Ted
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 1
For people in the Portland area i HIGHLY recommend Wilshore Farms for compost, in 5 years of being a professional landscaper i have never found a better source for compost. They are a small dairy farm that sells compost as a sideline, for $20/yard you get either straight cow manure compost, clay loam or 50/50 mix. If you buy a full truck load they don't charge a delivery fee (although a tip might be in order, if you ask me). As far as organic certification, i'm pretty sure they are not MOFGA certified... but it should be fine for organic growers as its just manure and sawdust.

Wilshore Farms

85 Hurricane Rd # R
Falmouth, ME 04105
(207) 797-4287
Jones
user 4562188
Portland, ME
Post #: 1
Hey all,

I've always bought bulk compost from Jordan's Farm on Wells Road in Cape Elizabeth - jordansfarm.com - I'm not sure if they're certified organic (it's not mentioned on the website...), and I think they charge a bit more than Wilshore, but they do produce locally.
Lori P.
LoriPower
Portland, ME
Post #: 10
It's funny, Wilshore Farms in Falmouth caused a big ruckus in the late 90s, I believe, because they were spreading human sludge! that might work for landscaping, but for growing organic food?
Aaron P.
user 6845673
Falmouth, ME
Post #: 4
It's funny, Wilshore Farms in Falmouth caused a big ruckus in the late 90s, I believe, because they were spreading human sludge! that might work for landscaping, but for growing organic food?
Yep, they where indeed... Some people complained about the smell, but i could never smell it and the the field where they used it is about 1/10th of a mile from the edge of my land. I personally think that people where just grossed out by the idea of humanure. Now instead of that sludge being used as fertilizer on a local farm its trucked up to Unity, pretty silly use of fuel if you ask me. Just to be clear about what they where doing, they where spreading processed (generally considered safe) sludge on fields that where in a fallow cycle, as far as I'm concerned this is a safe and useful practice.
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