The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Dogwoods as part of edible landscape...

Dogwoods as part of edible landscape...

zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 257
Elaine I soo feel for you! My big fear/problem is remembering which plants are edible, AND, to be honest, I can't remember allthe names of everything...plant labels get lost, etc... so... for my food forest, I am trying to ensure that the fruit of everything I put in my food forest zone is edible! Of course, I dunno if I'll remember that the bunchberries are a great adition to elderberries in jelly because they are very high in pectin, yet low flavor...and anyone who has made elderberry jelly probably knows that elderberry jelly is one of the hardest to get to set up to the right consistency!

I sooo need to et some Mas and Kousa dogwoods tho!

I can bring some dogwood jelly to work and have a guess the jelly game!!! :)



Jesse S.
user 29709632
Harrison, ME
Post #: 145
Hoping to revive this thread and maybe get some updates on folks' experiences with c. mas and c. kousa. A visit to the Maine Coastal Botanical Gardens brought me into close proximity to many kousas and a couple mas- all of which had nice colorful crops of fruit on them. Nice to see mature specimens in the landscape, they have a very nice presence and shape. I'm particularly interested in c mas- I think these need to be more widely planted for fruit- anyone getting fruit from these, and what varieties? I started with some 'Golden Glory' and seedling(from Oikos) c mas plants a couple years back, now I'm keen to plant a wider variety of fruiting selections.
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 717
For Cornus mas I have 'Yellow' (Yantarnii), 'Red Star' (Vidubetskii), and 'Kazanluk'. I think the 'Kazanluk' is the best flavored of that bunch. 'Yellow', to my taste, has a nice touch of pear flavor to it. Also, I'm really looking forward to making some mock olives with 'Yellow' once it start to kick out more fruit.

For Cornus kousa I have a 'Big Apple' that hasn't fruited yet and some small seedlings. I haven't been won over by the kousa fruits I've tried so far, but it's a beautiful tree and I may just need to find some favorite varieties and uses.

I went to the MCBGs last weekend and one of the C. mas there had very dark fruit. Wanted to cross through the bed to try the fruit, but I behaved. It was part of the row just over the rock wall on the entry walk. My profile pic #7 is from that group a few years ago.
Jesse S.
user 29709632
Harrison, ME
Post #: 146
That one might have been 'Golden Glory'- I saw a dark-fruited c. mas near the entrance to the perennial/rhod garden area labeled as such which had dark purple fruit.
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 1,039
I would choose a Viburnum lentago or V. nudum (both native) over a dogwood. The fruit is excellent. V. lentago makes the largest fruit. Tastes pruny.
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 718
Jesse, how does your 'Golden Glory' taste?
Jesse S.
user 29709632
Harrison, ME
Post #: 147
Greg- my son loved 'em! A bit tart to eat more than a couple out of hand, but great flavor for preserves or other processing, we didn't have enough try any of that this year- I called the flavor a cross between pomegranate and cranberry. Nice dark red/purple color, sized a wee bit larger than a cranberry. Golden Glory was a selection based on the ornamental qualities, I'm sure other cultivars which were developed for fruit produce more/better cornels.
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 719
Jesse, sounds nice. I wonder if the tartness will mellow if it sits for a few days in a bowl.

David, after your post I did a bit of reading. V. lentago gets a 4 of 5 taste rating at PFAF...good praise. They mention that the flavor varies plant to plant. Have you found that some plants are much nicer flavored than others?
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 1,040
I have not noticed much flavor variation but some berry size variation. The most difficult thing about growing is, like V. nudum, the seeds take 2 years to sprout. Both of these are delicious right off the bush and taste like prune/raisin. Both are native and relatively common. When I went picking these a few weeks ago I couldn't stop eating them. I made a jam out of some I picked which is excellent. Like dogwood they have a fairly large seed. V. lentago can be a small to medium tree while V. nudum is a big bush. Both are as pretty as any landscape bush and have nice flowers. I have planted V. nudum in the "Public Edible Landscape Project" in Washington Maine. I dug those, along with many other plantings, from my own woods.
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Polly U.
user 178168732
Portland, ME
Post #: 5
Sorry, this isn't strictly a reply about dogwood. Wondering how you use bunchberry in your landscaping, David. Is it more of a ground cover? Great discussion!
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