Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan) Message Board › Lapeer County Animal Control Director; Breeder

Lapeer County Animal Control Director; Breeder

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
PETITION: You will never guess who we caught breeding

Meetup Members,

Earlier this year we discovered that Carla Frantz, the woman investigating our kennel complaints in Lapeer County, was also breeding! And she wasn’t just breeding a few dogs. According to the former Animal Control Director, she acquired the breeding dogs from the kennel we were investigating as the largest puppy miller in Lapeer County – Linda Kaiser. Just unbelievable. It was confirmed with the meeting minutes at a township meeting where she state she was indeed breeding and selling. We met with her supervisor last week and asked Carla to resign.

Please help us make changes in Lapeer by signing our petition.
http://www.change.org...­




Lapeer Board of Commissioners: Set new standards for Animal Control Officers

As an Animal Control Officer, it's their job to look out for the welfare of animals, which includes making sure breeding kennels comply with the law and helping homeless pets get adopted. But how can the community trust an officer to do that when their running their own breeding operation?

Carla Frantz, newly appointed Chief Animal Control Officer, allegedly acquired popular small breed dogs and set up a kennel in an old barn located on 170 acres in Mussey Township located in St. Clair County. According to the minutes from the township meeting where she attempted to apply for a Hobby Breeders license, Frantz was commercially breeding and selling through a retail outlet.

Some things need to change in Lapeer County.

A Conflict of Interest Statement and Policy would protect animals by prohibiting Animal Control Officers from doing the following:

o Obtaining a dealer’s or commercial kennel license for personal or financial gain
o Obtaining a transfer of ownership by an animal’s owner to the animal control officer for personal or financial gain
o Giving away, selling or negotiating for the gift or sale to any individual, pet shop, dealer, or research facility of animal that may come into his/her custody in the course of carrying out their official duties

Breeding animals for personal or financial gain is a conflict of interest for any county employee whose performance is measured by animal placement rates. A secondary interest in breeding would create an appearance of impropriety as it could result in a lack of motivation to place homeless animals and instead promote more valuable and marketable animals such as “puppies” and “designer dogs”.

Please help homeless animals in Lapeer County and protect animals in kennels by signing this position letting the Lapeer County Commissions know families care about this issue.


Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,528

County shelter director speaks to controversy
Carla Frantz subject of investigation regarding euthanasia, public outreach


BY KRYSTAL JOHNS
810-452-2601
July 24, 2013

LAPEER — The investigation into citizens’ allegations against Lapeer County Animal Control and its chief, Carla Frantz, is underway and ongoing, and county officials want residents to know that each question that has been raised will be looked into thoroughly.

“We’re doing an internal investigation, and there are certain things I can’t respond to yet,” said Health Department Director Stephanie Simmons — Animal Control is overseen by the Health Department. “You can’t just jump on one piece of information without looking at the whole picture.”

Among the concerns that have been raised were that Frantz “euthanized prematurely and in violation of protocol” five dogs last week that could have been adopted out, according to a resident who addressed the Lapeer County Commission on Thursday.

Frantz said the beagles had been there well over a month, adopted out, brought back and, “We were getting full at the time.” The shelter capacity at the time is one of the issues up for debate, as others claim there was room and the animals did not have to be euthanized.

Allegedly, there were one or more rescues interested in taking those particular dogs, but Lapeer’s Adoptable Animals volunteer Wendy Yax said she hasn’t been in the office as much this summer and that she is the one that coordinates with the rescues, not Frantz.

“If we had known that, we’d have kept them for a few more days,” said Frantz on Tuesday.

It is unclear at this point why the animal that was featured for adoption in Wednesday’s County Press was euthanized before the ad even ran in the newspaper.

According to the minutes from the Mussey Township Planning Commission meeting on Jan. 22, Frantz lives in Mussey Township. She came in front of the commission and said she breeds dogs to sell to a wholesaler, and that she sometimes brings animals from the Lapeer shelter to her home. She requested they grant her status as a “consent or hobby kennel,” which would make her not subject to the same regulations as a commercial kennel. Her request was denied.

Concerns have been raised that she was taking pregnant animals home and then selling the puppies. She denied that, and said she also does not euthanize any animals at her home.

On Tuesday, Frantz did not wish to comment to The County Press about her Mussey Township kennel application because it was part of the county’s investigation, but she did say it has been quite some time since she has taken an animal home from the shelter.

“The last time I brought something home was four or five years ago, when (former chief Walt Rodabaugh) was there,” she said.

That, she said, was because she didn’t want to keep the dog and her puppies in the shelter for six weeks, so she took it home until the puppies were old enough to adopt out, then brought them all back to the shelter. More recently, Frantz said, volunteers have taken litters of kittens home until they are old enough for adoption.

Simmons said it hasn’t been policy that she and the county board of commissioners are made aware when animals are taken home for whatever reason.

“Walt certainly knew,” she said. “Walt was the chief and was managing operations at the time. But with the limitations, we do whatever we can do to make it work, and that’s an example of that.”

Simmons maintains that the three-person staff at Animal Control — Frantz and animal control officers Diana Woolner and T.J. Rodriguez — along with six to 10 volunteers frequently go out of their way to care for the animals, including coming in on the weekends to clean up after and feed the animals there.

That said, Simmons said they will be looking at ways to communicate with rescues to “optimize the adoption process.”

“We all agree on one thing: We want to increase adoptions and we want to decrease euthanasia,” she said. “The question is what can we do to communicate better.”

“It comes down to teamwork, and we all want the same thing — to give animals a home,” Frantz said. “But we don’t live in a perfect world, and that’s my job... It always upset me when people said ‘I could never do your job because I’m an animal lover.’”

In terms of how to increase adoption potential, Frantz said she is always open to suggestions that could help.

As for the investigation into concerns about Frantz and the way things are run at the shelter, Simmons said she will be doing a report for the county board once she has gathered all the information and answered all the questions that have been brought up.

“It just depends how long it takes to get everything looked into,” she said. “We really want to do this comprehensively and we want to do this properly... I don’t want to speak too soon.”

Lapeer County Commission chair Gary Roy said they are “going to look really in depth into this.”

“A lot of people are going to have a lot to answer for, but this is going to take some time,” he said.

Commissioner Lenny Schneider said he, too, is committed to making sure the public gets its answers, and he said he is glad people are getting involved if they have concerns.

“At the end of the day, we work for the public,” he said. “It’s our obligation to follow those through.”

Both Roy and Schneider said they have a lot of respect for the people who work at Animal Control.

“That’s a hard job,” Schneider said. “I respect the volunteers and employees alike. It takes a special person to do it. I couldn’t do it.”

“Nobody wants to see animals put to sleep,” said Roy. “I’ve had a lot of animals in my life. Nobody likes that. It’s a horrible job in the first place.”

Roy also added that the job of Animal Control, first and foremost, is public health.

“It’s not a rescue shelter. Never has been,” he said. “The purpose is for public health. The reason there are dog licenses and things is so people will vaccinate against rabies. It’s for protecting people, not animals.”

The county Board of Commissioners meets at 8:30 a.m. every Thursday in the commission chambers, located in the lower level of the County Complex, 255 Clay St., Lapeer. There is time allotted for the public to speak at the beginning and end of each meeting and speakers are limited to three minutes. Public time is for the board to hear concerns, but not to respond to them, as further information is often needed
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,532
Meetup Members - assuming you are interested in this campaign, forwarding another article. More to come, I am sure. Our Facebook is very active as everyone is in shock that the ACO director is breeding commerically.

7/24/13 EDITORIAL: The County Press

More questions than answers regarding shelter


IN OUR WORDS

We implore the Lapeer County Board of Commissioners take a hard look at how the county’s animal control shelter, under the direction of Carla Frantz, is being operated.

Last week after five beagles were reportedly euthanized within only but a few days when a couple of the animals became available for adoption, Stephanie Simmons (director of the county’s health department that oversees the animal shelter) pledged she would conduct an investigation. The review will address the concerns cited by many citizens, particularly as it relates to the shelter’s protocol for adoption and when an animal is to be euthanized.

Due to budget cuts at the county level the number of staff at the shelter has been cut to three as well as its days of operation when it’s open to the public. As a result of the cutbacks volunteers have been assisting in the shelter, and it’s some of these people that have noted some irregularities in the operation that gives reason for further investigation into a facility few neither visit nor understand how it works.

It’s kind of like trash collection — out of sight, and out of mind. Once you haul your garbage to the end of the road each week few people ever give it another thought. Other than making sure your animals are up to date on their license requirements, to think about what happens to cats and dogs that are brought in by members of the public, police officers or animal control employees who recover an animal might be depressing, because the fact is that some animals that go in never come out alive.

There are several animal rescue operations in the county that depend on volunteers and foster parents to take animals into their homes, so as to save them from being killed and give the volunteers the time necessary to find homes for the cats and dogs. The animal rescue groups and the animal shelter should share a common mission — to get neglected and loose animals off the streets while also accepting animals from citizens that they can no longer care for.

What’s troubling is it appears that animals (dogs in particular) have been killed before the animal rescue groups were notified the animals were set to be euthanized. It would seem logical to reach out to them on a regular basis if the alternative is the death of another animal.

Genesee County Animal Control has implemented a temporary no-kill policy at its shelter after a complaint that an employee allegedly told a man with two abandoned dogs that he could only leave the animals at the shelter if he signed a card requesting they be euthanized. Walt Rodabaugh, the former director of Lapeer County’s Animal Shelter before accepting the job in Genesee, has found himself in the hot seat, too. His job and management of the facility will be discussed by the county board when it meets this morning in Flint.

In addition to better defining protocol, policy and oversight from Simmons to the full county board, there is another matter that bears investigation as well.

Frantz, who lives near Capac in Mussey Township, told their local planning commission that she breeds dogs, but does not sell to the public (only to a wholesaler). She described her home-based business as a hobby kennel. On her 170-acre property she sought permission from the township to recognize “Consent Kennels” that are not subject to regulation as a kennel as defined in their current ordinance. According to official minutes, Frantz stated that she is the chief of animal control for Lapeer County and she sometimes has to bring dogs from the shelter to her home and the total number of animals on her property changes all the time.

She was denied her request by Mussey Township.

But this begs the question what is the director of our animal shelter doing taking dogs home? Is she taking dogs from the shelter for the purpose of breeding them for profit? If she feels there is a need to take them off site because of crowding at the Lapeer shelter, did she first notify a rescue organization to see if they can take the animal?

In order to maintain public trust with Frantz and the Lapeer County Animal Shelter there must be full disclosure of what Frantz is doing with the dogs she takes home, because it would seem to greatly decrease the odds of a dog ever being reunited with its owner should it have gotten loose when the dog is 40 miles away in the director’s home kennel. How can an animal be adopted if it’s not at the shelter where the public can view them or else be advertised in the local media?

Two of our readers in Sunday’s newspaper suggested if a solution to reduce or eliminate animal kills at the county shelter is more money (and staff) then they should propose an operating millage to ensure better management of the facility. Again, more food for thought for county administrators and the board. After all, you never know until you ask.

So many questions. We will interested to hear if there are any answers when the Lapeer County Board of Commissioners meets at 8:30 a.m. Thursday
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,533
Meetup Members

The ongoing investigation is regarding Carla Frantz’s breeding operation as mentioned in last Monday’s interview with the Health Department Director. It appears they are also looking into some other items. This article includes a long list of concerns local citizens have and our online petition.


7/28/13 LAPEER COUNTY PRESS: Animal rescue advocates, volunteers vent concerns about shelter operations

Investigation of accusations against director Carla Frantz by county health department may be complete in two weeks

Twenty people, many members of Lapeer Adoptable Animals founded by Wendy Yax, spoke during public comment period at the Lapeer County Board of Commissioner’s meeting Thursday morning. Concerns were aired regarding animal shelter director Carla Frantz and the euthanasia policy at the county facility.
Photo by Krystal Johns

LAPEER — It was clear at Thursday’s County Commission meeting that animals are a passion for many Lapeer County residents, as a large group of people, many wearing black and purple shirts bearing the Lapeer’s Adoptable Animals (LAA) logo, attended and spoke up during public time.

The impressive attendance was sparked by investigations into the conduct of Lapeer County Animal Control Chief Carla Frantz, who has been at the center of a number of allegations, including euthanizing five dogs that animal rescue groups had expressed a desire to foster and possibly breeding animals without a license at her Mussey Township home.

Wendy Yax is the founder of Lapeer Adoptable Animals.

“Basically, the board has this under review and we’re not ready to respond until the investigation is complete,” said board chair Gary Roy before public time got underway, adding that he thought that would take “at least a week, maybe two.”

Twenty women spoke during public time, sharing concerns, experiences and opinions about Animal Control and its operations.

The speaking was led by Wendy Yax of LAA, who said LAA was formed in hopes of dropping the euthanasia rate at the Lapeer County Animal Shelter. All five of the dogs that were in question, she said, were “happy, healthy and non aggressive” the day before they were put down, and that the euthanization cost the county an unnecessary $500, as she said it costs $50 per dog to euthanize and each dog could have brought in $50 of revenue.

Carla Frantz is director of the Lapeer County Animal Control.

LAA, she said, is no longer notified by Animal Control when animals are in immediate danger of euthanization.

Other speakers had stories of personal experiences with Animal Control, both recent and from before Frantz was chief. One LAA volunteer wanted to know what happened with the $3,000 LAA won in online contests. Some wanted Lapeer to be a no-kill shelter. Others said that isn’t necessarily the answer, but they’d like all options explored before euthanasia takes place.

Larraine Edwards, the board president of Paradise Animal Rescue, said the animal control offices from surrounding counties work well with the rescue, but since Paradise went into operation in 2003, they’ve only rescued 11 animals from Lapeer, with the last being in April 2011. Other facilities, she said, call when animals are at risk.

“This is common practice with other animal controls,” she said. “I am very happy to see an investigation.”

Michele Joliat of Metamora said Lapeer County is settling for a mediocre shelter, and said, “We have an opportunity to make it a model shelter.”

Others spoke about the conditions they’ve observed at the Lapeer shelter, or the general attitude they have encountered with the staff there.

Tina Rupprecht of Dryden Township expressed concern that volunteers would no longer be allowed into the shelter at the expense of the animals, and Lisa Redmond of Attica said she doesn’t believe that Animal Control employees come in on the weekends, saying she isn’t sure the animals are even fed or given water.

After public time ended, everyone filed out and other county business was addressed. Commissioner Lenny Schneider said, “It was difficult to hear a lot of that.”

“On one side of the coin, I’m very pleased that the public came out... There were 20 people that spoke to us and every one of them was very professional,” he said. “It was also disappointing as an elected representative that we didn’t hear about any of this stuff until now.”

Schneider said he wants the public to know that they can communicate concerns with their elected officials at any time, when they happen.

Also of note, this week the Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan group put up an online petition at www.change.org/petitions/ lapeer-county-boardof commissioners-set-newstandards for-animal-control officers#share, looking for support to ask the Lapeer County commissioners to, “Please develop and institute a Conflict of Interest Statement and Policy that would prohibit Animal Control Officers from doing the following:

• Obtaining a dealer’s or commercial kennel license for personal or financial gain

• Obtaining a transfer of ownership by an animal’s owner to the animal control officer for personal or financial gain

• Giving away, selling or negotiating for the gift or sale to any individual, pet shop, dealer, or research facility of animal that may come into his/her custody in the course of carrying out their official duties.”

The minutes from a Jan. 22, 2013, meeting of the Mussey Township planning commission indicate that Frantz said she breeds dogs for sale as a wholesaler on her 170 acres in the township. She requested a hobby kennel license, which would not hold her kennel to the requirements of a commercial kennel, and that request was denied.

It is unclear whether Frantz is still breeding dogs on her property, as that is part of the ongoing investigation and county officials would not comment.

Also under investigation are the reporting procedures at Lapeer County Animal Control. Health Department Director Stephanie Simmons said Animal Control submits reports “at least quarterly.” There are questions about the number of animals that were taken into the shelter in 2012 not matching the number of animals that were adopted out, transferred or euthanized. Simmons said she is checking into those numbers to find out where the discrepancies occurred. Based on the 2012 annual report submitted by Frantz, there are 68 dogs and 13 cats that are not accounted for in the reported statistics.

The county Board of Commissioners meets at 8:30 a.m. every Thursday in the commission chambers, located in the lower level of the County Complex, 255 Clay St., Lapeer. There is time allotted for the public to speak at the beginning and end of each meeting and speakers are limited to three minutes. Public time is for the board to hear concerns, but not to respond to them, as further information is often needed.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,534


Anti-puppy mill group asks Commissioners
to prevent conflict of interest,
Chief Officer breeding


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 29, 2013

CONTACT: Pam Sordyl, 734-828-1400, pmamichinfo@yahoo.com

Lapeer County, Mich. – Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan members will be attending the next Lapeer County Commissioners Meeting scheduled on Thursday, August 1, 2013 to propose a Conflict of Interest Statement and Policy for Animal Control Officers that would prevent officers from breeding, selling or transferring animals for personal gain.

The county Board of Commissioners meets at 8:30 a.m. every Thursday in the commission chambers, located in the lower level of the County Complex, 255 Clay St., Lapeer. Concerned citizens are encouraged to attend.

Last week the group launched a petition asking for a Conflict of Interest Statement and Policy that would prohibit Animal Control Officers from doing the following. It now has over 1,000 signatures. These signatures will be delivered to the County Commissioners at the meeting.

o Obtaining a dealer’s or commercial kennel license for personal or financial gain
o Obtaining a transfer of ownership by an animal’s owner to the animal control officer for personal or financial gain
o Giving away, selling or negotiating for the gift or sale to any individual, pet shop, dealer, or research facility of any animal that may come into his/her custody in the course of carrying out their official duties
o Giving away, selling or negotiating for the gift or sale to any horse dealer or auction of any equine that may come into his/her custody in the course of carrying out their duties.
o Accepting animals as shelter donations from kennel operators or breeders that are inspected by the animal control department.

Link to Petition:
http://www.change.org...­
Carla Frantz was appointed Chief Animal Control Officer in 2012 and then set up a kennel in an old barn located in St. Clair County. According to the minutes from the township meeting where she attempted to apply for a Hobby Breeders license, Frantz was commercially breeding and selling through a retail outlet.
“As an Animal Control Officer, it's their job to look out for the welfare of animals, which includes making sure breeding kennels comply with the law and helping homeless pets get adopted. But how can the community trust an officer to do that when they’re running their own breeding operation? “ said Pam Sordyl, founder of

Puppy Mill Awareness
Link to the Mussey Township Meeting Minutes
http://www.musseytown...­



Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan is working to end the mass production of dogs in commercial kennels, or "puppy mills.” Our mission is to educate the public about the cruel cycle of commercial dog breeding and the pet store link. Read more at www.meetup.com/puppymillawareness­.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,535
8/4/13 County hires outside attorney to investigate shelter claims
BY KRYSTAL JOHNS 810-452-2601

LAPEER — The investigation into allegations against Lapeer County Animal Control Chief Carla Frantz and operations at the shelter has been turned over to an independent attorney.

Robert Nyovich of Birmingham-based firm McConaghy and Nyovich has helped the county with internal investigations in the past, said county administrator John Biscoe. The investigation, Biscoe said, is to follow-up on some broad concerns that have been raised about Frantz, internal operations at Animal Control and compliance with laws, policies and procedures.

“Given the attention that’s been focused on Lapeer County Animal Control and it’s chief, it seemed the most prudent course would be to turn it over to an independent examination of the allegations made by individuals in the county and a review of policies and procedures,” Biscoe said.

Nyovich’s services come at a cost of $150 per hour, and Biscoe said there is no way to say how long the investigation will take.

Biscoe said he doesn’t expect it will take more than a few weeks, however, that’s subject to change based on whatever Nyovich comes across.

“He’s going to take as long as it takes,” Biscoe said. “He has to do what he has to do.”
Complaints against Frantz include possibly not following policies regarding euthanasia of animals at the shelter and allegedly breeding animals at her home near Capac.

Five people spoke regarding the issues at Thursday’s County Commission meeting.

“There’s an appearance of impropriety here,” said Pam Sordyl of an organization called Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan. The organization has an online petition at www.change.org/petitions/lapeer-county­ boardofcommissioners-set-newstandards for-animal-control officers#share asking for a conflict of interest policy preventing the chief of animal control from breeding animals, and she said there are already more than 1,000 signatures on the petition.

Frantz’s father, Carl Frantz, spoke passionately in defense of his daughter at the meeting. He said that at the Jan. 22 Mussey Township Planning Commission meeting during which Carla requested a hobby kennel license, she was actually speaking on behalf of her mother.

“Carla never did have a kennel. She went to speak for her mother,” he said, adding that their request for a license was not denied.
“We withdrew it because it was going to cost us more than $5,000 in permits,” he said.
Carl also indicated his displeasure that photos of their property have been circulated.
“We do not appreciate you people coming on our property taking pictures, going into our buildings,” he said.
He also spoke up about his beliefs about Lapeer’s Adoptable Animals volunteer Wendy Yax’s motives, claiming this all stems from Carla being hired as chief over Animal Control Officer Diane Woolner, which brought about a visible, yet silent, response from Yax.

“Their main concern is they want to get chief Carla fired from her job,” he said. “That’s all they’re after.”
County board chair Gary Roy assured those at the meeting that everyone — employees and volunteers alike — will be looked into during the investigation.

“We will get to the bottom, one way or another,” he said, adding, “Carla is a county employee and basically we haven’t seen that she has violated anything that she wasn’t supposed to do.”

http://www.change.org...­
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,536


LTE – Taxpayers expect all issues to be address for $150 an hour

Regarding your recent article about the county hiring an outside attorney to investigate shelter claims - I met with the $150 / hour attorney last week to share all of my concerns about the Chief Animal Control Officer’s breeding operation and potential lost revenue for the county. It really isn’t a secret that the officer was breeding. The grapevine had some consistent stories, but we all know that attorneys need the facts. The minutes from the Mussey Township January 2013 meeting (a legal document) stated that the officer was seeking a hobby breeder permit and she lived on 170 acres. The minutes also quote the officer as saying she brought dogs home to this kennel so she was not certain what the numbers would be. So when the hired gun attorney started off the meeting telling me that the officer wasn’t breeding, instead her mother was, the dogs were licensed to her family and she doesn’t even live there, I was floored. Is this really going to be the “cover story”? Not only did he tell me he was friends with County Administrator Biscoe, making we question how independent he was, which was later reinforced when he told me that he would not investigate any of my complaints. He didn’t take many notes and all I remember him asking me was what my goal was. Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan has a simple mission statement, to end the mass production of animals produced in commercial kennels. I have no doubt that the chief officer was/is operating a commercial kennel if they are not selling directly to the public. Such a conflict of interest warrants resignation, the only appropriate action. A humane director that has the best interest of the animals and Lapeer County tax payers in mind should be hired.

Pam Sordyl
Founder of Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan
Clarkston, Mi
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,537
Letter to the Editor: Breeding for profit is bad business

Backyard and commercial breeding for profit is something that should not be acceptable in Lapeer or anywhere else. Even if Mr. Frantz’s kennel was not associated to our local animal control and shelter, the community does not need large-scale breeding no matter what they call it. When profits are involved animals receive minimal care and are often hidden in barns with inadequate water, food, or shelter. They always lack adequate veterinary care because raising over 20 dogs would just be too expensive. Another concern of mine is that the Frantz’s are elderly and may not be able to provide adequate socialization and care for a large number of dogs.

If the dogs are individually licensed, per your article, who is conducting the inspections? Who is checking conditions?

They are not what we call “Hobby breeders” because hobby breeders only have a handful of dogs and will breed for show or sport. If they had a handful of dogs, they would not need to cage them in a barn. Are the Frantz’s showing dogs? Are these purebreds? Do they belong to a club?

Per the Mussey Township Meeting minutes, the Frantzs are not selling directly to the public, so puppy buyers don’t have an easy opportunity to meet the parents or check conditions. This is called commercial breeding and wholesalers are known as a “puppy mills.” The driving force behind puppy mills is money.

The most important thing the public can do to stop these types of operations are to take away their business! Simply refuse to buy a puppy if you don't know about his ancestry and haven't seen the parents or birthplace.

In addition, their puppy farming contributes to the homeless pet crisis. If you want a purebred, consider adopting from a shelter or breed rescue group, rather than from a pet store or commercial breeder.

Julie Hebron
Lapeer, MI
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,538
Letter to the Editor

I have some concerns/questions on the article you wrote about Carla and Carl Frantz. Much of it is not making much sense to me.

Why didn't Carla just say she was applying for a hobby kennel license for her mom to begin with? She also says she lives on 170 acres and sometimes brings home animals to her place. Which is where the kennel is, right? Since they withdrew the permit, does that mean they have stopped breeding or are they running an illegal kennel?

Carl stated, he was not pleased with the pictures circulating, why? If it is a nice facility, shouldn't he be proud?

I am assured, if Carla was doing her job, by looking out for homeless animals, teaching the spay neuter practices and not bringing more possibly homeless dogs into this world, no one would be venting at the commissioners meetings, right?

I am wondering if any of the commissioners and or the Health Department have visited the kennel? I would have to think, if it is a reputable kennel, they would be showing it off with photos of every dog and the environment they live in. Is Carla's mother willing to show the commissioners the vet records of each dog?

It appears to me it's a family business, which is a conflict of interest to the Chief Director of Lapeer Animal Control.

Sincerely, Leann Earns
Otter Lake, Mi
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,539



Investigation underway at Lapeer County Animal Shelter
Posted: Jul 25, 2013 11:53 AM EDT Updated: Jul 25, 2013 4:24 PM EDT

By Lori Dougovito - bio | email

LAPEER COUNTY (WJRT) -
(07/25/13) - An investigation is underway at the Lapeer County Animal Shelter.

Dozens of concerned citizens spoke out at Thursday morning's County Board of Commissioners meeting about practices at the animal shelter. Many of those who spoke at Thursday morning's meeting are volunteers at the shelter.

The Board says it is looking into the shelter's high euthanasia rate and other allegations.

One of the main concerns is the euthanization of some dogs and cats last week and whether they needed to be put down when they were.

Lapeer County Controller administrator John Biscoe tells ABC12 that is one of the things an outside lawyer will be looking at during the investigation into how Lapeer County Animal is run, if there are issues. Biscoe says there will be a broad look at allegations, operations, cash handling and compliance.

Lapeer County Animal Control declined comment.

At least one person called for new management at Lapeer County Animal Control. The health department oversees it. Carla Frantz heads Lapeer County Animal Control.

http://www.abc12.com/...­
Powered by mvnForum

This Meetup is community funded

$5.00/year

Member dues are used to:
  • Cover Meetup costs

Voluntary

Members are not required to pay dues, but are encouraged to chip in.

Cancel dues at any time.

Dues are billed each year.

Our Sponsors

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy