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JACKSON, PIERCE & EISENHOWER

All attendees must read, understand and agree to the waiver as outlined on this website.

This is considered an advanced hike.  Please know your abilities.

We'll meet in the Edmands path parking lot and shuttle cars over to the Webster Jackson Trail head. 

Total distance is 10.07 miles.  starting at Webster-Jackson Trailhead 44° 12' 55" 71° 24' 28" This trail connects US 302 at a small parking area just south of the Macomber Family Information Center (Crawford Depot) with the summits of both Mt. Webster and Mt. Jackson. The trail, blazed in blue, leaves the east side of US[masked] mi. south of the Crawford Depot and 0.1 mi. north of the Gate of the Notch. 0.10 mi 5 min +67 ft on Webster-Jackson Trail 0.10 mi 5 min +67 ft This trail connects US 302 at a small parking area just south of the Macomber Family Information Center (Crawford Depot) with the summits of both Mt. Webster and Mt. Jackson, and provides the opportunity for an interesting loop trip, because the two summits are linked by the Webster Cliff Trail. Sections of the Webster-Jackson Trail are steep and rough. The trail, blazed in blue, leaves the east side of US 302 between the Crawford Depot and the Gate of the Notch. It runs through a clearing, enters the woods, and passes the side path leading right to Elephant Head. (Elephant Head is an interesting ledge that forms the east side of the Gate of the Notch, a mass of gray rock striped with veins of white quartz providing a remarkable likeness to an elephant’s head and trunk. The path runs through the woods parallel to the highway at an easy grade, then ascends across the summit of the knob and descends 40 yd. to the top of the ledge, which overlooks Crawford Notch and affords fine views.) to the junction of Elephant Head Spur 44° 12' 58" 71° 24' 24" 0.50 mi 29 min +466 ft on Webster-Jackson Trail 0.60 mi 34 min +533 ft The main trail climbs along the south bank of Elephant Head Brook, well above the stream, then turns right, away from the brook. Angling up the mountainside roughly parallel to the highway, nearly level stretches alternating with sharp uphill pitches, it crosses Little Mossy Brook, and a side path leads right 60 yd. to Bugle Cliff. This is a massive ledge overlooking Crawford Notch, where the view is well worth the slight extra effort required; if ice is present, exercise extreme caution. to the junction of Bugle Cliff spur 44° 12' 44" 71° 24' 05" 0.80 mi 39 min +329 ft on Webster-Jackson Trail 1.40 mi 1 hr 13 min +862 ft The main trail continues climbing across the slope, with two short descents, then crosses Flume Cascade Brook. After a mostly gradual ascent, the trail divides within sound of Silver Cascade Brook, the left branch for Mt. Jackson and the right for Mt. Webster. 1.20 mi 1 hr 15 min +1265 ft on Webster-Jackson Trail 2.60 mi 2 hr 28 min +2128 ft The Jackson (left) branch ascends gradually until it comes within sight of Silver Cascade Brook, then begins to climb moderately with rough, wet footing. The trail crosses three branches of the brook in quick succession. A short distance below the base of the rocky summit cone, it passes Tisdale Spring (unreliable, often scanty and muddy). The trail soon swings right and ascends steep ledges, with several fairly difficult scrambles, to the open summit, where it meets the Webster Cliff Trail. to Mt Jackson 44° 12' 12" 71° 22' 32" 1.60 mi 57 min -226 ft on Webster Cliff Trail 2 Distance Time Elev Change Trail / Waypoint Latitude Longitude 4.20 mi 3 hr 25 min +1902 ft This trail, a part of the AT, leaves the east side of US 302 opposite Willey House Station Rd., 1.0 mi. south of the Willey House site. The parking area is a stop for the AMC Hiker Shuttle. The trail ascends along the edge of the spectacular cliffs that form the east wall of Crawford Notch, passing numerous viewpoints, then leads over Mts. Webster, Jackson, and Pierce to Crawford Path just north of Mt. Pierce. The section of trail ascending to Mt. Webster is more difficult and tiring than the statistics would suggest, with a number of ledge scrambles interspersed through the ascent along the top of the cliffs. The trail leaves the summit of Mt. Jackson toward Mt. Pierce, following a line of cairns running north, and descends very steeply over the ledges at the north end of the cone into the scrub, then the grade eases. The trail enters and winds through open alpine meadows with views of Mt. Washington and Mt. Jackson, then turns sharply left and drops into the woods. The trail continues up and down over a hump along the ridge toward Mt. Pierce, then ascends gradually to the jct. with Mizpah Cutoff, which leads left (west) to Crawford Path. to the junction of Mizpah Cutoff 44° 13' 09" 71° 22' 15" 0.10 mi 3 min -18 ft on Webster Cliff Trail 4.30 mi 3 hr 28 min +1883 ft Mizpah Spring Hut (where there are also tentsites for backpackers) is reached, and the Mt. Clinton Trail to the Dry River valley diverges right (southeast), heading diagonally down the hut clearing. to AMC Mizpah Spring Hut 44° 13' 09" 71° 22' 11" 0.80 mi 40 min +494 ft on Webster Cliff Trail 5.10 mi 4 hr 8 min +2377 ft Continuing past the hut, the trail soon ascends a steep, rough section with two ladders, and reaches an open ledge with good views south and west. The grade lessens, and after a sharp right turn in a ledgy area, the trail reaches the summit of the southwest knob of Mt. Pierce, which affords a view of the summit of Mt. Washington. The trail descends into a sag and ascends easily through scrub to the summit of Mt. Pierce, where it comes into the open. to Mt Pierce 44° 13' 37" 71° 21' 57" 0.09 mi 3 min -56 ft on Webster Cliff Trail 5.19 mi 4 hr 11 min +2321 ft It then descends moderately in the open in the same direction (northeast) about 150 yd. to its junction with Crawford Path. to the junction of Crawford Path 44° 13' 40" 71° 21' 53" Due to hazardous conditions (heavy trail and bridge damages) Dry River Trail is closed until further notice. entering alpine zone 1.20 mi 51 min +179 ft on Crawford Path 3 Distance Time Elev Change Trail / Waypoint Latitude Longitude 6.39 mi 5 hr 2 min +2500 ft This trail is considered the oldest continuously maintained footpath in the United States. The first section, leading up Mt. Pierce (Mt. Clinton), was cut in 1819 by Abel Crawford and his son Ethan Allen Crawford. In 1840, Thomas J. Crawford, a younger son of Abel, converted the footpath into a bridle path, but more than a century has passed since it was used regularly for ascents on horseback. The trail still mostly follows the original path, except for the section between Mt. Monroe and Westside Trail, which was relocated to take Crawford Path off the windswept ridge and down past the shelter at Lakes of the Clouds. From the jct. just north of Mt. Pierce to the summit of Mt. Washington, Crawford Path is part of the AT and is blazed in white. Caution: Parts of this trail are dangerous in bad weather. Several lives have been lost on Crawford Path because of failure to observe proper precautions. Below Mt. Eisenhower, a number of ledges are exposed to the weather, but they are scattered, and shelter is usually available in nearby scrub. From the Eisenhower- Franklin col, the trail runs completely above treeline, exposed to the full force of all storms. The most dangerous part of the path is the section on the cone of Mt. Washington, beyond Lakes of the Clouds Hut. Always carry a compass and study the map before starting. If trouble arises on or above Mt. Monroe, take refuge at Lakes of the Clouds Hut or go down Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail. The Crawford Path is well marked above treeline with large cairns; in poor visibility, great care should be exercised to stay on it because many of the other paths in the vicinity are much less clearly marked. If the path is lost in bad weather and cannot be found again after diligent effort, one should travel west, descending into the woods and following streams downhill to the roads. On the southeast, toward the Dry River valley, nearly all the slopes are more precipitous, the river crossings are potentially dangerous, and the distance to a highway is much greater. The main parking area for the south end of Crawford Path is located on the west side of Mt. Clinton Rd. 0.1 mi. north of its jct. with US 302. The former parking lot on US 302 has been closed, and Crawford Path hikers are requested to use the Mt. Clinton Rd. lot because the parking spaces at other lots in the area are needed for the trails that originate from those lots. For historical reasons, the name Crawford Path continues to be attached to the old route of the trail that leads directly from US 302, and the short path that connects Crawford Path to the Mt. Clinton Rd. parking lot is called Crawford Connector. In the descriptions that follow, the trail is described from its original trailhead on US 302 across from the Highland Center. From Mt. Pierce to Mt. Eisenhower, Crawford Path runs through patches of scrub and woods with many open ledges that give magnificent views in all directions. Cairns and the marks left by many feet on the rocks indicate the way.The trail winds about, heading generally in a northeasterly direction, staying fairly near the poorly defined crest of the broad ridge, which is composed of several rounded humps. the trail crosses a small stream in the col, then ascends mostly on ledges to the jct. with Mt. Eisenhower Loop, which diverges left. The trip over this summit adds only 0.2 mi. and 300 ft. of climbing and provides excellent views in good weather. to the junction of Mt Eisenhower Loop 44° 14' 14" 71° 21' 03" 0.40 mi 23 min +353 ft on Mt Eisenhower Loop 6.79 mi 5 hr 25 min +2853 ft This short trail parallels Crawford Path, climbing over the bare, flat summit of Mt. Eisenhower, which provides magnificent views. In 2009 the AMC trail crew installed new wooden steps and ladders on the trail. Mt. Eisenhower Loop diverges from its southern junction with Crawford Path at the south edge of the summit dome, climbs easily, then turns sharply left in a flat area and ascends steadily to the summit. to Mt Eisenhower 44° 14' 26" 71° 21' 01" 0.38 mi 11 min -330 ft on Mt Eisenhower Loop 7.17 mi 5 hr 36 min +2523 ft From there, it descends moderately to a ledge overlooking Red Pond (more a bog than a pond), then drops steeply by switchbacks over ledges, and passes through a grassy sag just to the left of Red Pond. It climbs briefly to a junction left with Edmands Path. to the junction of Edmands Path 44° 14' 33" 71° 20' 42" 4 Distance Time Elev Change Trail / Waypoint Latitude Longitude 2.90 mi 1 hr 30 min -2405 ft on Edmands Path 10.07 mi 7 hr 6 min +117 ft Edmands Path climbs to Mt. Eisenhower Loop near its junction with Crawford Path in the Eisenhower-Franklin col. This trail provides the shortest route to the summit of Mt. Eisenhower and a relatively easy access to the middle portion of Crawford Path and the Southern Presidentials. The last 0.2-mi. segment before it joins Mt. Eisenhower Loop and Crawford Path is very exposed to northwest winds and, although short, can create a serious problem in bad weather. The ledgy brook crossings in the upper part of the trail can be treacherous in icy conditions. Though erosion has made the footing noticeably rougher in recent years, the trail retains what is probably the most moderate grade and best footing of any comparable trail in the Presidential Range. From Mt. Eisenhower Loop, a few yards from Crawford Path, Edmands Path crosses the nose of a ridge in the open on a footway paved with carefully placed stones. It then enters the scrub and contours around the north slope of Mt. Eisenhower at a nearly level grade, even ascending slightly, affording excellent views out through a fringe of trees. It descends a short, steep rocky pitch, crosses a small brook running over a ledge, and descends to pass through a tiny stone gateway. The trail angles down the mountainside on a footway supported by extensive rock cribbing. It descends steadily, undulating down the west ridge of Mt. Eisenhower, carefully searching out the most comfortable grades. After a long descent, the trail crosses a wet area and merges to the right with an old logging road. It turns sharp left to cross Abenaki Brook on a bridge and runs nearly level across two small brooks to the trailhead. to Edmands Path Trailhead 44° 14' 57" 71° 23' 28" The Edmands Path climbs to the Mt. Eisenhower Loop near its junction with the Crawford Path in the Eisenhower-Franklin col, starting from a parking lot on the east side of the Mt. Clinton Rd. 2.3 north of its junction with US 302 and 1.5 mi. south of its junction with Base Rd. and Jefferson Notch Rd. 10.07 mi 7 hr 6 min +117 ft Totals



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  • Rebecca

    Being a wimp given the forecast ..have fun!

    July 19, 2013

  • Jim

    Hi Paul, Dianne,
    Any thoughts about the weather?

    July 19, 2013

  • Cindy T

    This sounds like a great hike but I am intimidated by the hot, humid weather and likely thunderstorms. So guess I will stay by the ocean.

    July 18, 2013

  • Jim

    Any one interested in carpooling? I can meet Rt 3N exit 8 park&Ride in Nashua, or 93N Exit 2 Salem, or in Concord

    July 17, 2013

  • Abbe

    So sorry, I have to cancel, but enjoy what looks to be an amazing hike!

    July 17, 2013

  • Eric

    Sorry but had a conflict come up and can't make this one.

    July 16, 2013

  • Olivia

    I can't make it anymore due to last minute scheduling changes. I am so sorry and I will surely make the next one

    July 16, 2013

  • Abbe

    Would anyone be interested in carpooling from Boston? (I'd happily contribute to gas money!)

    July 15, 2013

  • Denise

    After some reflection I feel I may not be up to speed with this group.Hope this helps with the WL

    July 14, 2013

  • Cindy T

    I think I just cancelled the wrong event. I would like to attend this hike.

    June 28, 2013

  • Cindy T

    A family 4th event came up. Why am I surprised? Have a good hike!

    June 28, 2013

  • Domenic D.

    I just found out that my granddaughters" first birthday celebration is that day!

    June 25, 2013

2 went

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