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APRIL BOOK CLUB

We will be reading Jonathan Franzen's "Freedom:  A Novel." 

Patty and Walter Berglund were the new pioneers of old St. Paul—the gentrifiers, the hands-on parents, the avant-garde of the Whole Foods generation. Patty was the ideal sort of neighbor, who could tell you where to recycle your batteries and how to get the local cops to actually do their job. She was an enviably perfect mother and the wife of Walter’s dreams. Together with Walter—environmental lawyer, commuter cyclist, total family man—she was doing her small part to build a better world.

But now, in the new millennium, the Berglunds have become a mystery. Why has their teenage son moved in with the aggressively Republican family next door? Why has Walter taken a job working with Big Coal? What exactly is Richard Katz—outré rocker and Walter’s college best friend and rival—still doing in the picture? Most of all, what has happened to Patty? Why has the bright star of Barrier Street become “a very different kind of neighbor,” an implacable Fury coming unhinged before the street’s attentive eyes?

In his first novel since The Corrections, Jonathan Franzen has given us an epic of contemporary love and marriage. Freedom comically and tragically captures the temptations and burdens of liberty: the thrills of teenage lust, the shaken compromises of middle age, the wages of suburban sprawl, the heavy weight of empire. In charting the mistakes and joys of Freedom’s characters as they struggle to learn how to live in an ever more confusing world, Franzen has produced an indelible and deeply moving portrait of our time.

 

 

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  • Ellen N.

    Great

    April 27, 2014

  • solange

    Does the book have to be read before meetings? Or at least part of it? Just wondering. Thanks and looking forward to making one of these in the future!

    April 18, 2014

  • Ellen N.

    I agree Mary - wish you could make the meeting to discuss this further - not all the quality writing of Corrections

    April 18, 2014

  • Mary P.

    I am unable to come tomorrow but was looking forward to diss-cussing this book. Thought title should be Tiresome. Do not know why it was so praised. Such unlike able characters with a soap opera plot.The author never left adolescence.

    1 · April 18, 2014

  • Lori W.

    Isn't this book at the library? i couldn't find it there.

    February 21, 2014

7 went

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