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Nilanjan Raychaudhuri: Building Reactive web applications in Play framework

So what is wrong with building web applications for the JVM? It’s not fun anymore. Something is missing from the experience.The type of web applications we are building has changed.Today’s web applications are integrating more real-time data, have more scalability requirements, and need to be more user-friendly. However, the web frameworks that we use to build web applications for the JVM haven’t improved very much.
So what do we need? We need a framework that makes web development fun and easy by combining the new client-side technologies like HTML5, LESS, and CoffeeScript, with server-side tools that provide scalability and development ease so that you can focus on solving business problems using tool that meets today’s demand. Play Framework combines the best tools from the Java and Scala worlds with the latest client-side technologies so that you can be productive from start. More importantly it brings fun back to web development.

Bio:

Nilanjan Raychaudhuri is a consultant/trainer and core member of Play framework team. He works for Typesafe. He has more than 12 years of experience managing and developing software solutions in Java, Ruby, Groovy and also in Scala. He is zealous about programming in Scala ever since he got introduced to this beautiful language. He enjoys sharing his experience via talks in various conferences and he is also the author of the “Scala in Action” book.

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  • Henrik M

    Wery good talk!

    1 · September 9, 2013

  • Endre S.

    Nilanjan Raychaudhuri or organizers: Would it be possible to get this obviously very interesting talk also in Stavanger, for our javaBin chapter? I would have to be on javaBin volunteer conditions: Reasonable transport and, if relevant, hotel paid, but otherwise "pro bono".

    September 8, 2013

    • Stein Kåre S.

      I'll ask. If you are coming to JavaZone you can even ask him yourself.

      September 9, 2013

  • Janniche L.

    Hvis dere ikke har funnet location så kan jeg foreslå Teknologihuset :)

    1 · August 20, 2013

    • Endre S.

      What about streaming? Is this set up yet? (As I recall, this was one of the "key selling points" about this venue: Streaming kit for the main venues, also for local "overflow" needs (streaming into next room).)

      September 8, 2013

    • Stein Kåre S.

      Hi! I asked about streaming but it looks like that requires some effort: they could hire someone to do it (and we would have to pay) or we do it our selfs. It would have been a sweet thing to to.

      September 9, 2013

  • Thanawut A.

    Web app dev (asp.net and java)

    September 9, 2013

  • Thanawut A.

    Web app dev (asp.net and java)

    September 9, 2013

  • Endre S.

    I assume much of the following question will be addressed during the talk, but I wonder whether it will be compared directly: How does this stack compare to the sheer amazing awesomeness of the "grunt stack" for development?

    See, grunt as build system and AngularJS as front framework is one of the most potent and awesome setups I have witnessed in all my years as coder. Everything is automatic - but in a good way! The grunt process (which is built on node, but that is just an implementation detail, not requirement for the total stack) runs the development server:

    September 8, 2013

    • Endre S.

      Change any resource in the entire SPA app you're developing, save it, and the browser instantly reloads. Change a SCSS file (SASS, same idea as LESS), and the system picks this up, recompiles into the results, and then (awesomeness!) "re-injects" this total stylesheet into the already running browsers, so that it doesn't even have to reload the page - the heading simply goes from 14 til 16 points like magic! Combine this with Chrome inspector, and it just simply rocks.

      September 8, 2013

    • Endre S.

      The setup allows for very fine grained division of the code of the SPA app, giving an unprecedented modularization of the HTML, JS and styles.

      However, when you build the system for prod (not devel), it concats all JS down to one file, all styles to one file, even all HTML down to one file, and can even do the images as css sprites - and then each file is packed. The resulting total SPA app is typically under 1MB, and that is all that must be downloaded from the server "forever" - the rest is just tiny JSON going back and forth.

      We run such a project now with a standard Java Spring stack as the JSON backend - thus one have a complete separation between the frontend and backend stacks too, no imposed tech choices.

      I find this stack absolutely awesome, and certainly massive fun compared to everything else I have ever seen.

      Therefore: How does the TypeSafe stack measure up?!

      September 8, 2013

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