addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscontroller-playcrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1linklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Read "Hamlet"

...the dread of something after death -
The undiscover'd country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns - puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of...
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all
.

The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, is a play that invites superlatives - most popular, most performed, most discussed, most quoted. Perhaps, then, an introduction is unnecessary, although you can find a link to a synopsis at the end of this post. The language is so irresistible that I'll just add a few more quotations (and a note that Hamlet himself is witty as well as "melancholy").

What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculties! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals! And yet to me what is this quintessence of dust?

LOCATION & LOGISTICS: We'll meet at the Montlake Branch of Seattle Public Library at[masked]th Ave E., in the meeting room. (This event is not sponsored by the Seattle Public Library.) See here for directions: http://www.spl.org/locations/montlake-branch/mon-getting-to-the-branch . Metro buses 25, 43 and 48 serve this branch, and there are parking spaces at the library and on nearby streets.

We can bring food into the meeting room as long as we clean up afterwards. This is Shakespeare's longest play - expect it to take all afternoon. (You can leave early if necessary, just let us know when we're assigning parts.) We can bring snacks, to help us keep up our stamina! (Food and non-alcoholic drinks are permitted as long as we clean up afterwards.) Hamlet himself has many more lines than any other Shakespearean character, enough to share the part between a number of us!

... blest are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled
That they are not a pipe for Fortune's finger
To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.

Bring a copy of the text if you have one, but if you don't, don't worry - we can share. It's not necessary to read, watch or listen to the play before hand, though it helps with understanding the lines and characters. For a synopsis of the plot you can go here: http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Play-Synopse.aspx?IdPlay=2

If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,
Absent thee from felicity awhile,
And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,
To tell my story.

Join or login to comment.

  • Paul K.

    Thanks for those comments Laurie. I am realizing now what I missed by not getting to participate in Rodney Cottier's master class.

    January 18, 2013

  • Laurie

    Ham. Oh good Horatio, what a wounded name,
    (Things standing thus vnknowne) shall liue behind me.
    If thou did'st euer hold me in thy heart,
    Absent thee from felicitie awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in paine,
    To tell my Storie.

    As much as legacy is, in part, the theme of this scene and the purpose of the F, the actors sought to “tell” the Bard’s “Storie.” F ln. 3830. “But for the men overseeing the project, John Hemings and Henry Condell, friends and fellow actors who had been remembered in Shakespeare’s will, the additional labor and cost were worth the effort for the sake of producing an edition that was close to the practice of the theater. They wanted all the plays in print so that people could, as they wrote in the prefatory address to the reader, ‘read him and again and again,’ but they also wanted ‘the great variety of readers’ to work from texts that were close to the theater-life for which Shakespeare originally intended them.” (B&R)

    January 18, 2013

  • Laurie

    As some of you know, last summer Toni and I were so fortunate to attend a master class with Rodney Cottier on the authority of the First Folio of Shakespeare. Hamlet is a great example of how the First Quarto, Second Quarto (Q2) and First Folio (F) differ from each other. F has some 70 lines not contained in Q2 and some 230 lines contained in Q2 are absent in F. Many editors conflate the two or rely primarily on Q2. However, “what ought to have been obvious to anyone who works in the theater” is that “the two [Q] and the [F] texts represent three discrete moments in the life of Hamlet, that plays change in the course of rehearsal, production, and revival, and that the major variants between the early printed versions almost certainly reflect this process.” Hamlet (ed. Bates & Rasmussen, 2008) The scene on film that has moved me the most in preparing for our reading is the final scene with Hamlet and Horatio. (B, I will bring cream, sugar, stirrers for coffee. TY!)

    January 18, 2013

  • Barbara

    I'll figure out how to bring coffee, if someone will bring cream/sugar.

    I think Starbucks makes some kind of portable, insulated vat o' coffee.

    January 13, 2013

    • Paul K.

      Good idea! I'll be pleased to go half with the cost for whatever you bring, including cream and sugar if it's easier for Starbucks to supply it.

      January 14, 2013

    • Barbara

      OK, THX!!! Great idea.

      January 14, 2013

  • Patsy

    I wish I could go!

    January 13, 2013

  • Paul K.

    Looking forward to this as it will be my first live experience of the play, having never seen it performed.

    1 · January 6, 2013

  • Diane

    I will contribute to the snacks.

    January 6, 2013

  • WendyS

    I am new to this group, and rusty on my Shakespeare. I would like to attend, but may not read. Is that okay? :) wendy

    January 5, 2013

    • Nancy E.

      Hi Wendy, sure, you are welcome to come and listen - there are also always some small parts. And if you find yourself wanting more, that's fine too! We see who shows up and who wants what part, and go from there - it always works out.

      1 · January 5, 2013

    • WendyS

      This is a wonderful new adventure!

      January 5, 2013

  • Brian G.

    On vacation in rainy Los Angeles
    Wish you all seasons greetings
    See you all at Hamlet. Brian Gaffikin

    December 24, 2012

20 went

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy