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Bay Area Backcountry Buddies Message Board › Lost Coast Backpacking

Lost Coast Backpacking

A former member
Post #: 16
Has anyone backpacked the Lost Coast recently that would be able to provide information. We are thinking about going there and I am hoping to find out what we are getting into. Also, does anyone know if they allow dogs on the trek.

Thanks a Bunch!
Wendy Scott
(415)309-5086
A former member
Post #: 58
I led a trip there two years ago at about this time of year. I remember seeing a couple with a dog camping overnight and doing the southern-bound trip. One of the biggest logistics headaches you will deal with is the car shuttling situation, unless you plan to pay for shuttle (this was a fairly expensive option if I recall). Also, have a good understanding of the tide tables and how those will affect your trip. You will not be able to get across several sections of the Northern trail if the tides are too high. Finally, one spot where we had to camp, we saw a large number of ticks, so prepare accordingly.

Here are some links I used for planning in my trip:
http://www.blm.gov/ca...­
http://gregable.com/2...­
http://www.gorp.com/p...­

http://arturo.crespow...­
http://www.summitpost...­
http://www.flickr.com...­

David M.
user 32228562
Berkeley, CA
Post #: 1
Hi,
I hike the stretch south of Mattole river a couple of times a year and was last there a month ago. It's a great hike and very straightforward. Lots of great spots for camping and a lot of good water sources. There are a couple of stream crossings but at this time of year they are pretty straightforward.
On the logistics side the regs require a bear can, you get the free permit at the trail head, tide times are important and you can bring your dog.
Dave
Brian
user 9860949
San Francisco, CA
Post #: 23
Hey,

I was on the trip with Jose (which he planned excellently by the way) and one recommendation I have is to have everyone meet at a place close to the southern trailhead, split into two groups, trade cars, and do a key switch. It takes some trailhead juggling of gear, but logistically is the actually the easiest way.

Also for us at least it ended up being 3 semi-hard half days, so prepare for both hiking and relaxing.

-Brian
Mike
user 31552282
Berkeley, CA
Post #: 5
One of the biggest logistics headaches you will deal with is the car shuttling situation, unless you plan to pay for shuttle

Even then, it's a long ride.

I avoided the shuttle by looping back on the King Range. It obviously requires climbing; the tail end is a hike against the wind; water is scarce up there; it's not as "lost", since there are some access roads; and you're more likely to encounter ticks. But the views are great.
A former member
Post #: 17
I led a trip there two years ago at about this time of year. I remember seeing a couple with a dog camping overnight and doing the southern-bound trip. One of the biggest logistics headaches you will deal with is the car shuttling situation, unless you plan to pay for shuttle (this was a fairly expensive option if I recall). Also, have a good understanding of the tide tables and how those will affect your trip. You will not be able to get across several sections of the Northern trail if the tides are too high. Finally, one spot where we had to camp, we saw a large number of ticks, so prepare accordingly.

Here are some links I used for planning in my trip:
http://www.blm.gov/ca...­
http://gregable.com/2...­
http://www.gorp.com/p...­

http://arturo.crespow...­
http://www.summitpost...­
http://www.flickr.com...­



I read somewhere that there was scrambling involved and slippery rocks. What can you tell me about that? I broke my ankle in November and I'm worried about these two obstacles.
A former member
Post #: 59
Wendy, I don't recall any scrambling on the northern 25 miles of the trail. Maybe the southern section of the trail is what was being referred to? However, the northern part of the trail is unique in the terrain in which you will be hiking if you stay along the coast like we did (and what most folks do, I believe). About one-third of the 25 miles you will be able to hike on a single-track trail on the bluffs above the coast. The rest of the trek will involve walking on a variety of sand, small boulders, and/or large rocks. Any sections involving sand will be fairly slow-going (maybe even as slow as 1 mile per hour on the really soft sand with full packs). It will be a little faster on the rocky sections. Each section of terrain is often at least a mile or more. And there will be a creek crossing roughly every 1 or 2 miles ... most are no more than 5-10ft wide and will be trivial to cross. A few will be more challenging. We found man-made log crossings at most, but not all them.

You should be able to see some of the rocky/sandy terrain as well as the trails in the bluffs in my album here:
https://plus.google.c...­
Mike
user 31552282
Berkeley, CA
Post #: 7
does anyone know if they allow dogs on the trek.

We did see one rattlesnake out there, in the middle of the trail, on Big Flat.
didjmunkey
user 8071751
Milpitas, CA
Post #: 9
Just completed Lost Coast a few weeks ago, juvenile rattlesnakes were a pretty common sight on the beach for the first 5 miles, watch your step, these guys do not make a sound and hang out on the sand looking like a chunk of driftwood. after that most of what we ran into were lizards and mice. no bear tracks or scat noticed. Randall Creek and Cooskie Creek are good first day stops, Cooskie has seen some flooding since Jose's trip and the driftwood structures are washed away, you have to hike up a little higher and back from the creek. Ticks were abundant. If you do 8 miles a day you will link up with the better of creek sites along the way. It is also best to leave as early as possible to get to the next site before other hikers do and claim the best spots. Between Big Creek and Big Flat there is a 1/4 mile of scree from a landslide that you will have to cross, its pretty stable and there are cairns marking the way. There are a few mile long sections of boulders 1-2ft that provide a respite from the gravel sand ( i found the boulders very fast going with trek poles to gauge your next boulder hop), if you have ankle injuries take your time and look for cairns along the bluffs to get yourself off the rocks. There was a pyramid shaped cairn after Big Flat (heading south) which allowed you stay off the beach for an extra mile before descending back to boulder hopping. I have to say that Shipman and Buck creek were the best kept sites of the trail. I highly recommend footwear with a hard sole and wide foot profile. I wore scree boots the whole way and was very happy to have brought them. gaiters are very nice to have, the winds are so strong at times that they can knock you off balance, and you will find yourself being pelted by rocks caught in the wind the first 12 miles (heading south). another thing about the tides, consult your chart or take a picture of the one at the trailhead. As a general note, the afternoon high tide still allows crossing the impassable areas, its the evening tide you don't want to mess with.

Shuttle: There are two shuttle services and pricing seems to change on the drivers mood. We heard prices for the same route and number of people varied from 50 to 125 per person. Dropping off cars at Shelter cove, picking up permit and heading up to Mattole via Kings peak rd or ettersburg road.(partly unpaved 1.5 hours to mattole) and parking at mattole was much less of a hassle. Heading home from mattole there are two routes to 101, one towards ferndale (if you find yourself crossing the green 15mph bridge you are headed towards ferndale) adds an hour to the drive but you get to drive through giant sequoias. The fastest is to take the ettersburg road route back to redway and then to 101.

Willits is a good place to stop, eat and gas up, this town had the lowest prices in the area, elsewhere gas was at least 50 cents higher.
A former member
Post #: 2
I just went the weekend of May 4-5 with the Sierra Club Bay Chapter and yes, there were dogs. It was absolutely INCREDIBLE! Definitely have to figure out the tides ahead of time. I can send photos if you want. Noreen
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