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The 912 Project-Nebraska Message Board › Common Core Children For Sale

Common Core Children For Sale

Darlene E.
user 14539080
Omaha, NE
Post #: 306
Children for Sale

By Alyson Williams

No more decisions behind closed doors! Let’s get everyone talking about Common Core.

In the spring of 2011 I received a receipt for the sale of my children. It came in the form of a flyer that simply notified me that my state and thereby my children’s school would comply with the Common Core. No other details of the transaction were included. The transaction was complete, and I had no say. In fact, it was the very first time I’d heard about it.

I know what you’re thinking. That’s outrageous! Common Core has nothing to do with selling things, especially not children!

Okay, so the idea that the State School Board and Governor who’d made this decision could be described as “selling” my children is hyperbole. It is an exaggeration intended to convey an emotion regarding who, in this land of the free, has ultimate authority over decisions that directly affect my children’s intellectual development, privacy, and future opportunities. It is not even an accurate representation of my initial reaction to the flyer. I say it to make a point that I didn’t realize until much, much later… this isn’t just an issue of education, but of money and control. Please allow me to explain.

That first day my husband picked up the flyer and asked me, “What is Common Core?” To be honest, I had no idea. We looked it up online. We read that they were standards for each grade that would be consistent across a number of states. They were described as higher standards, internationally benchmarked, state-led, and inclusive of parent and teacher in-put. It didn’t sound like a bad thing, but why hadn’t we ever heard about it before? Again, did I miss the parent in-put meeting or questionnaire… the vote in our legislature? Who from my state had helped to write the standards? In consideration of the decades of disagreement on education trends that I’ve observed regarding education, how in the world did that many states settle all their differences enough to agree on the same standards? It must have taken years, right? How could I have missed it?

At first it was really difficult to get answers to all my questions. I started by asking the people who were in charge of implementing the standards at the school district office, and later talked with my representative on the local school board. I made phone calls and I went to public meetings. We talked a lot about the standards themselves. No one seemed to know the answers to, or wanted to talk about my questions about how the decision was made, the cost, or how it influenced my ability as a parent to advocate for my children regarding curriculum. I even had the chance to ask the Governor himself at a couple of local political meetings. I was always given a similar response. It usually went something like this:

Question: “How much will this cost?”

Answer: “These are really good standards.”



Question: “I read that the Algebra that was offered in 8th grade, will now not be offered until 9th grade. How is this a higher standard?”

Answer: “These are better standards. They go deeper into concepts.”



Question: “Was there a public meeting that I missed?”

Answer: “You should really read the standards. This is a good thing.”



Question: “Isn’t it against the Constitution and the law of the land to have a national curriculum under the control of the federal government?’

Answer: “Don’t you want your kids to have the best curriculum?”



It got to the point where I felt like I was talking to Jedi masters who, instead of actually answering my questions, would wave their hand in my face and say, “You will like these standards.”

I stopped asking. I started reading.

I read the standards. I read about who wrote the standards. I read about the timeline of how we adopted the standards (before the standards were written.) I read my state’s Race to the Top grant application, in which we said we were going to adopt the standards. I read the rejection of that grant application and why we wouldn’t be given additional funding to pay for this commitment. I read how standardized national test scores are measured and how states are ranked. I read news articles, blogs, technical documents, legislation, speeches given by the US Education Secretary and other principle players, and even a few international resolutions regarding education.

I learned a lot.

I learned that most other parents didn’t know what the Common Core was either.

I learned that the standards were state accepted, but definitely not “state led.”

I learned that the international benchmark claim is a pretty shaky one and doesn’t mean they are better than or even equal to international standards that are considered high.

I learned that there was NO public input before the standards were adopted. State-level decision makers had very little time themselves and had to agree to them in principle as the actual standards were not yet complete.

I learned that the only content experts on the panel to review the standards had refused to sign off on them, and why they thought the standards were flawed.

I learned that much of the specific standards are not supported by research but are considered experimental.

I learned that in addition to national standards we agreed to new national tests that are funded and controlled by the federal government.

I learned that in my state, a portion of teacher pay is dependent on student test performance.

I learned that not only test scores, but additional personal information about my children and our family would be tracked in a state-wide data collection project for the express purpose of making decisions about their educational path and “aligning” them with the workforce.

I learned that there are fields for tracking home-schooled children in this database too.

I learned that the first step toward getting pre-school age children into this data project is currently underway with new legislation that would start a new state preschool program.

I learned that this data project was federally funded with a stipulation that it be compatible with other state’s data projects. Wouldn’t this feature create a de facto national database of children?

I learned that my parental rights to deny the collection of this data or restrict who has access to it have been changed at the federal level through executive regulation, not the legislative process.

I learned that these rights as protected under state law are currently under review and could also be changed.

I learned that the financing, writing, evaluation, and promotion of the standards had all been done by non-governmental special interest groups with a common agenda.

I learned that their agenda was in direct conflict with what I consider to be the best interests of my children, my family, and even my country.






Link to flow chart here:
http://www.utahnsagai...­

(Click to enlarge)

What is going on in Nebraska with Common Core? Nebraska has not officially adopted Common Core. You will find it in 2012-2013 Standards Assessment and Accountability on page 15. It was also in the 2011 Assessment. http://www.education....­
Darlene E.
user 14539080
Omaha, NE
Post #: 307



There are total of five videos that are a must watch.
Darlene E.
user 14539080
Omaha, NE
Post #: 310
This study is in conflict with COmmon Core


tudent Testing Success Linked to Grasp of Basic Math
A study recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience finds that a strong grasp of basic mathematical skills can serve as a good predictor of student success on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. The PSAT is an exam designed to gauge student preparedness for the SAT and is typically administered to kids in ninth and [...]


A study recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience finds that a strong grasp of basic mathematical skills can serve as a good predictor of student success on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. The PSAT is an exam designed to gauge student preparedness for the SAT and is typically administered to kids in ninth and tenth grade.

To reach these conclusions, Daniel Ansari, Associate Professor in Western’s Department of Psychology and a principal investigator at the Brain and Mind Institute, used functional magnetic resonance imaging machines to monitor the brain activity of high school seniors. The MRI highlighted certain areas being utilized by students who were doing simple math exercise, and activity in those regions correlated strongly with their PSAT scores.

“The surprising thing here is that we found both a positive and negative relationship between brain activation during the very elementary, single digit arithmetic tasks and how well they did on the PSAT test, which measures advanced, high school level math skills,” says Ansari, Canada Research Chair in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience.

Those students who showed grater activity in the left side of the brain – correlating with better knowledge of basic math – also tended to have higher PSAT scores than their peers who engaged the left side of the brain less when doing the same math problems. Particularly, students who were activating the supramarginal gyrus, which is the part of the brain linked to fact retrieval, also performed better on their PSATs.

Ansari posits that lacking a solid math background — resulting in a weak PSAT showing — were attempting to derive basic mathematical facts that their better-performing peers already knew. That means that they spent more time in each question, and even simple problems posed more of a challenge, especially when working under a deadline imposed by a timed exam.

”If you are a high school student and you are using brain circuits that we know are associated with fact retrieval and fluency, we see evidence that you are also going to score better on the math portion of the college admission test. There is a clear link between fluency and high level abilities — being fluent at basic math counts.”

These findings could serve as a new weapon in the arsenal of education reformers who are looking to bring back a traditional style of mathematical instruction that puts a focus on mastery of basic skills. It appears that when it comes to elementary math, this kind of an approach is more predictive of future math success – as measured by PSAT scores – than one focused on problem solving.

COMMENTS
Numerical Cognition Laboratory › Study from the Numerical Cognition Laboratory reveals new link between basic math skills and PSAT math success
JANUARY 16, 2013 AT 9:04 AM
[...] http://www.educationn...­ This was written by Celia. Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2013, at 12:04 pm. Filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow comments here with the RSS feed. Post a comment or leave a trackback. [...]





http://www.educationn...­




Glen F.
user 11731625
Springfield, NE
Post #: 193
The last 10 minutes of this video goes in to the UN Agenda 21 education plan. They have determined that more educated people make more money, consume more resources and are thus a threat to the environment. Better if they are dumbed down and compliant. They want to teach the kids that facts are man made things, science is by consensus and to trust experts.

http://www.youtube.co...­
Darlene E.
user 14539080
Omaha, NE
Post #: 312
The wealthier a country is and the better educated people are the better they take care of the environment. Great Video!
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