Union Square Reading Group Message Board › What would you like to read for July and August?

What would you like to read for July and August?

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Ion F.
ionFreeman
Brooklyn, NY
Post #: 459
At our March meeting, we're going to select July and August books. If you're going to be there for the Powell, feel free to add a recommendation here.

Please check if it's in print, list the author and title, and promote it a little. No one's going to read more than about 12 words.

Judy A.
j.emily
New York, NY
Post #: 16
Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson:
The modern world with its unrelenting complexity and confusion seems to be surrounding Major Ernest Pettigrew from all sides. He must watch as his son sells his soul to climb the social ladder, then he finds himself attracted to the completely unacceptable Pakistani woman who owns the local shop. Now he must deal with the recent death of his brother and a controversy over a precious family heirloom. He cares deeply about doing what is socially proper, but plunges head first into situations that his village friends and family view as just the opposite. Much of the conflict in this novel centers on this struggle between doing what is right and doing what is expected and socially acceptable.
Ted
user 11054425
New York, NY
Post #: 44
"The Adventures of Augie March" by Saul Bellow
from Amazon.com "Bold, expansive, and keenly humorous, The Adventures of Augie March blends street language with literary elegance to tell the story of a poor Chicago boy growing up during the Great Depression. A "born recruit," Augie makes himself available for hire by plungers, schemers, risk takers, and operators, compiling a record of choices that is—to say the least— eccentric."

"Henderson the Rain King" by Saul Bellow
from Publishers Weekly via Amazon: "... the seriocomic tale of Eugene Henderson, who flees workaday American anomie for the freeing chaos of Africa"
Judy A.
j.emily
New York, NY
Post #: 17
We haven't read a non-fiction book in a while. I would suggest 'Bitter Lemons' by Lawrence Durrell, a memoir of his time in Cyprus before the British were evicted. Wonderful writing and a real sense of the land and the people.
A former member
Post #: 2
Dreams of My Russian Summers by Andrei Makine. From amazon.com: "The first of Makine's four novels to appear in English, this autobiographical novel won the 1995 Prix Medicis for Best Foreign Fiction as well as France's prestigious Prix Goncourt, never before awarded to a non-Frenchman. Its coming-of-age story describes young Andrei's summers with his French grandmother Charlotte in the remote Russian village of Saranza" and
"Andrei Makine, born in Siberia in 1957, has written an prose ode to his French grandmother, a memorable account of life in Communist Russia as lived by the woman who gave him joy, comfort, and permission to dream of other worlds. Each summer, Andrei and his sister visited this grandmother at the edge of Russia's vast steppes, and in the evening she told them stories of her past".
Ion F.
ionFreeman
Brooklyn, NY
Post #: 461
Following Polly
From Booklist
Bergreen's lighthearted mystery follows the unfortunate Alice Teakle as she attempts to put her life back together after being fired from her job at a New York City casting agency. At loose ends, Alice runs into an old Harvard classmate, Polly Dawson, and decides to tail her on her daily errands. Alice grows more and more intrigued by Polly's escapades and apparent love affairs, and becomes determined to learn more about the woman who rejected her friendship in college. As luck (or dedicated stalking) would have it, Alice is the first person to stumble upon Polly Dawson's bloody corpse and immediately becomes the police's number-one suspect. While being questioned at the precinct, Alice slips out the door, and suddenly is on the run. She bumps into Charlie, an old college flame, and appeals to him for help. As the police continue their pursuit of Alice, she tries to discover the identity of the real killer in order to clear her name. But she'll need to work quickly. The police—and the killer—are closing in. --Katherine Boyle

According to one Amazon reviewer, it's a fun Summer read! I'm thinking we need one.
Jim H.
JimHeld
Group Organizer
Forest Hills, NY
Post #: 4
I think there are a lot of great books in the "Young adult" part of the bookstore that we could get into.

Particularly "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins. It's a future story of a world where children are put into the arena and forced to fight for their families future and their own.

It's another book like "The Book Thief" with a voice and characters that are all its own.
Ion F.
ionFreeman
Brooklyn, NY
Post #: 462
Judy,
If it's time for non-fiction, it's got to be Chomsky's Making the Future: The Unipolar Imperial Moment. Right? It's coming out in paperback March 1st!
http://www.citylights...­
Ion
Jim H.
JimHeld
Group Organizer
Forest Hills, NY
Post #: 5
Judy and I just saw "Lost in the Stars" and it made me want to read "Cry, the beloved Country" by Alan Paton.

Moving and powerful book about South Africa under white rule and how some Black people dealt with it.

Iris
user 9915241
New York, NY
Post #: 2
What about reading some of the top contenders in the last vote, like WUTHERING HEIGHTS and/or THE SUN ALSO RISES?
Iris Levy
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