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Book Discussion: The World Peace Diet by Will Tuttle

The World Peace Diet, which became a #1 Amazon best-seller in March, 2010, offers a compelling and liberating new understanding of our food and our culture. It has been called one of the most important books of the 21st century: the foundation of a new society based on the truth of the interconnectedness of all life. It is the first book to make explicit the invisible connections between our culture, our food, and the source of our broad range of problems—and the way to a positive transformation in our individual and collective lives. 


The World Peace Diet is an award-winning book. If you want to understand the big picture of our culture and why we have the unyielding dilemmas we face, and how we can solve them, this book is for you.


You can get a copy at Minnesota's only vegan store, Ethique Nouveau, for $22, order the book online for $20 signed by author or download a pdf copy for $12 (saves trees): 

http://willtuttle.com/order3.htm


Please take notes as you're reading and come prepared to share. This book discussion will stay focused on the World Peace Diet with minimal side bar conversations so that we can respect everyone in the group and their goal of discussing World Peace Diet. 


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  • Theresa D.

    Good to see you

    1 · May 21, 2014

  • Natalie

    Great to hear conversations that have an impact taking place.

    May 21, 2014

  • Ashley P.

    I'm so disappointed that my plans changed tonight, and that I can't make it tonight. Sorry for the late notice. I was really looking forward to this discussion!

    May 20, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      No worries friend. How did you like the book?

      May 20, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    According to Laura Moretti, it’s not possible for us to grasp with our imagination the realities of slaughterhouse carnage:

    I realize it is incredibly easy to imagine the inside of a slaughterhouse and not be so affected by it—for the human grasp is limited. It can’t hear the sound of a large animal pushed against its will into a kill chute, its frantic struggles, the reverberating pop of the captive-bolt pistol, the heavy thump to the floor, the kicking against metal, the groaning of the dying, the screech of pulleys and chains, the hydraulic release hiss, the splashing blood, like water from a garden hose hitting cement. It can’t smell the stench of manure and sweat, blood and putrefying flesh and organs. It can’t feel the absolute fear, panic, terror. It can’t know the absolute will of each and every life to desperately, frantically, vainly hold on.

    The human mind can’t imagine the inside of a slaughterhouse; it is something one can only experience—and it is utterly shocking.3

    May 20, 2014

  • Justin L.

    So this is a full-book discussion book club? Was it ever considered that it might be a better idea to break it down into chapters and meet on a weekly basis? I would think it might make it easier to tackle such a richly dense book. thanks.

    May 17, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      Justin, that's a great idea. I think it might be hard for some people to do that but I'd be willing to try it out for a future book.

      Here is a link to the author's page where they mention Friday calls hosted by him to discuss topics in the book. I suggest you call in to some of them and I'll probably do the same.


      http://worldpeacemast...­

      May 20, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    “Every day forty thousand children die in the world for lack of food. We who overeat in the West, who are feeding grains to animals to make meat, are eating the flesh of these children.”

    May 20, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    I am hoping to make it to this book discussion . near the wedge.

    May 19, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      Hopefully we'll see you there!

      May 19, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Three copies just arrived at Ethique Nouveau, so if anyone still wants to grab a copy, they're here. :)

    May 14, 2014

    • Justin L.

      are they still available?

      May 17, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    If she is a female, she may be raised to be, like her mother, a slave in the dairy. She will be removed from her mother as early as possible so as not to waste the mother’s marketable milk. She will be dehorned, usually by the use of a red-hot electric iron applied to her horn buttons. This is described in a modern dairy management textbook:

    . . . lay the calf on its side and put your knee on the neck. . . . The dehorner has to be left on the button for approximately five to twenty seconds. The time will seem longer, because of the combined unpleasantness of burning hair and a struggling calf . . . dehorning may be complete . . . when you hear a squeaking sound as the dehorner is twisted. It is the sound of the dehorner tip rubbing against the bone of the skull.11

    pg. 116 The World Peace Diet

    May 17, 2014

  • Theresa D.

    What I like about the World Peace Diet is that Will Tuttle makes the connection between dominating animals in early ancient herding cultures and how this has impacted cultures negatively up until present day. Also, he talks about how treating animals comes back to haunt us later. I really look forward to the meetup group next Tuesday.

    May 15, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      I too find those connections interesting!

      May 17, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Fundamentally, cow’s milk is a substance designed by nature for baby cows, not for humans. We are the only species that drinks the milk intended for the young of other species, and we are the only species that insists on drinking milk beyond the time of weaning. It seems a we cannot bear the thought of growing up and leaving home. Perhaps we long for infancy and the peaceful oblivion of our mother’s breast, and if hers
    isn’t available, then we’ll use the breast of any lactating mother, even if she’s a cow and we have to kill her babies to get to it. Just as the complete unnaturalness of humans killing and eating animals is obvious if we
    contemplate trying to do it without implements, so is the drinking of milk. The easy availability of veal cutlets and cheap hamburger masks their true cost and the cruelty of their dairy-farm origin, as do the tidy packages of cheese, milk, cream, and butter in the refrigerated dairy sections.

    - World Peace Diet

    May 15, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    It’s ironic that the burden of justifying possible nutritional deficiencies rests on vegans (“where do you get your protein/vitamin B- 12/etc.?”), because research shows that vegans typically have twice the fruit and vegetable intake of people eating the standard American diet. In recent studies, vegans had higher intakes of sixteen out of the nineteen nutrients studied, including three times more vitamin C, vitamin E, and fiber, twice the folate, magnesium, copper, and manganese, and more calcium and plenty of protein.53 Vegans also had half the saturated fat intake, one-sixth the rate of being overweight, and, while vegans were shown to be at risk for deficiencies in three nutrients (calcium, iodine, and vitamin B-12), people eating the standard American diet were at risk for deficiencies in seven nutrients (calcium, iodine, vitamin C, vitamin E, fiber, folate, and magnesium).54

    Pg. 91 of The World Peace Diet by Dr. Will Tuttle

    (B12 is an easy supplement to take if necessary)

    May 14, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    “The living world is dying in our time. . . . When our forebears com- menced their exploitation of this continent they believed the animate resources of the New World were infinite and inexhaustible. The vulner- ability of that living fabric—the intricacy and fragility of its all-too-finite parts—was beyond their comprehension. It can be said in their defense that they were mostly ignorant of the inevitable consequences of their dreadful depredations. We who are alive today can claim no such exculpation for our biocidal actions and their dire consequences.”
    —Farley Mowat, Sea of Slaughter1


    “Earth provides enough to satisfy every man’s need, but not every man’s greed.”
    —Mahatma Gandhi

    May 14, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    pg. 71 of The World Peace Diet by Will Tuttle

    According to T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., professor of nutritional bio- chemistry at Cornell University and lead researcher of one of the largest human nutrition studies yet undertaken, animal protein is completely inferior to plant protein for human needs:

    "Our study suggests that the closer one approaches a total plant food diet, the greater the health benefit. . . . It turns out that animal protein, when consumed, exhibits a variety of undesirable health effects. Whether it is the immune system, various enzyme systems, the uptake of carcinogens into the cells, or hormonal activities, animal protein generally only causes mischief.11"

    May 13, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    “My refusing to eat flesh occasioned an inconveniency, and I was frequently chided for my singularity, but, with this lighter repast, I made the greater progress, from greater clearness of head and quicker comprehension.”
    —Benjamin Franklin

    Inspired by the great thinkers of the past that knew animal consumption wasn't right for humans.

    1 · May 12, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    "When we contemplate our tastes, we can see how conditioned they
    actually are. More importantly, though, we can see how utterly unsupportable they are as reasons to commit violence against defenseless, feeling beings. Self-centered craving for pleasure and fulfillment at the expense of others is the antithesis of the Golden Rule and of every stan dard of morality." - Dr. Will Tuttle

    May 12, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi everyone! I needed to change the date for the book club from Saturday morning to Tuesday the 20th at 6pm... same location.

    I hope that still works for each of you.

    May 3, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      That's too bad - I have a previous commitment on the 20th. I'm still waiting for my book to come in at the library and am really looking forward to reading it when it does. Thanks for making me aware of it!

      May 4, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      If you'd like to meet and discuss at some point after you read the book just let me know.

      May 7, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    “As long as men massacre animals, they will kill each other. Indeed, he who sows the seeds of murder and pain cannot reap joy and love.” —Pythagoras

    May 7, 2014

  • Heather L.

    Not able to make it because I work but this book is definitely worth the time and discussion.

    May 4, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      Thanks for your thoughts on this one Heather... see you soon!

      May 7, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    “I am grateful for this powerful and cogent book. It has stretched my thinking (and heart) about animals, compassion, and our society and will probably be catalytic in furthering my personal growth.”—John Mackey, Founder and C.E.O., Whole Foods, Inc.

    May 4, 2014

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