The Volusia Buddhist Fellowship Meetup Pages

Volusia Buddhist Fellowship is a non-sectarian Buddhist group based in DeLand. Morris Sekiyo Sullivan, Sensei has been practicing meditation for more than 20 years, andwas introduced to Buddhism in the late 1970s when a martial arts class led to an interest in Zen Buddhism. Since then, he explored Tibetan Vietnamese Zen practices before he began studying Theravada Buddhism and Vipassana meditation under Than Chaokhun Sunan Prah Vijitrdhammapani at Wat Florida Dhammaram in Kissimmee, where he also ordained for a monastic retreat.

In 2008, Sekiyo enrolled in the lay minister program with Bright Dawn Institute for American Buddhism. In May, 2010, he completed that program and was inducted into that ministry.

He also co-leads (with a Zen monk from Brevard county) a prison meditation group at Tomoka Correctional Institution.

Volusia Buddhist Fellowship meets every Wednesday and on the last Sunday of each month at 7 p.m. A social hour precedes the Sunday meetings. All meetings are open to the public, and anyone interested in meditation and/or Buddhism is welcome to attend. There is no charge for the meetings. Donations are accepted.

Volusia Buddhist Fellowship meetings are very informal. Typically, there is a brief ceremony consisting of a few minutes of chanting and group readings for those who consider themselves practicing Buddhists. Each meeting includes either a guided meditation or silent meditation. Most meditations last about 20 minutes. Once per month, usually on the last Wednesday, meditation may consist of 45 minutes of silent sitting and walking meditation.

Meditation is followed by informal discussion of dharma and meditation. Meditation instruction is always available before we begin for newcomers who desire guidance.

Buddhism is the fifth-largest religion in the world, and a recent survey suggests it is the fastest-growing religion in the United States. According to Pew Forum's U.S Religious Landscape Survey, the Buddhist religion grew 170% from 1990 to 2001, essentially tying Buddhism with Islam as the 3rd most practiced religion in America.

However, Buddhism is unique in that the focus of the religion is more on practice than belief. In other words, the Buddha's teachings (the dharma) emphasize ethical behavior, training the mind through meditation, and development of wisdom and discernment, rather than any particular belief system. There is no requirement one "become a Buddhist" to practice Buddhist principles.

Please feel free to email us at volusiabuddhist@gmail.com if you have questions or visit our website, volusiabuddhist.org.

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About The Volusia Buddhist Fellowship Meetup October 2, 2010 8:34 PM Rev. Morris Sekiyo S.

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