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Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Making high vitamin butter oil

Making high vitamin butter oil

Alan A.
user 11947259
London, GB
Post #: 36
Has anyone tried making butter oil? The green pastures product is very expensive for what seems like a relatively straightforward process. I have an abundant source of raw cream. I imagine its the same as making ghee only at a lower temperature although in practice it may be more complicated:


"A method for producing high vitamin butter oil
includes the steps of providing a quantity of
cow's milk and separating the cream in the cow's
milk from the skim in the cow's milk. The cream
is then churned into butter and the butter is
removed from the buttermilk remaining in the
cream. The butter is then placed in a cooking
container and cooked at a temperature below 150°
F. until a majority of the butter separates into
clarified butter containing high vitamin butter
oil and butter wax adjacent the top of the
cooking container and butter solids adjacent the
base of the cooking container. The clarified
butter is removed from the cooking container and
allowed to stand, and then the high vitamin
butter oil is separated from the butter wax by a
centrifuge or the like. The high vitamin butter
oil is then ready for use as a dietary
supplement."
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,331
It is the whole process that is expensive. You have about 8 lbs of cream to make a jar. It has to be cream from cows eating fast growing grass at spring or fall.

But sure, if you can find a centrifuge and get cream from the right time of day then there is no reason why somebody else cannot undertake this, but understand that the marketing effort would be extremely difficult and it is a time consuming process. Making standard butter is hard enough. And you have to ensure that the centrifuging doesn't cause too much heat, which is very difficult to achieve.

I would certainly encourage entrepreneurs to give it a go and would support anybody who bought a product to market or, found an implement capable of making this, but I suspect that the cost of cream and time and effort would not make the process of making this at home worthwhile, unless if you actually owned a cow.
Eleanor B.
user 20445061
London, GB
Post #: 68
If I remember rightly recently someone worked out how much butter would need to be consumed to equate to a couple of butter oil capsules. It was around 2 tablespoons worth but you should look back on that thread or the person who worked it out might reply. I can't remember who it was sorry.
I made some raw butter the other days. It was easy. I had not tried raw cream or butter and it is surprisingly not very buttery. Like the milk it tastes sweet. It is strange how 'cooked' typical milk now tastes and I guess it's the same with the butter.
Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 183
Hi Alan

I didn't realise that Green Pastures used pasteurized milk...it says Raw on the bottle! I got some at Christmas as a present but it was very pale. I complained to the supplier but they weren't that understanding. I have stopped eating UK butter at the moment because of the animals being grain fed over the Winter (I am still making goat and buffalo kefir though). However I have just stated Pukka Ghee as it comes from Austria and I hope the animals have more assess to grass! So I have a spoonful of this with CLO in the morning.

That said I am looking forward to the Spring and Summer when the animals are out and about again. I hope go have sourced some Jersey organic raw milk, butter and cream by then....I miss sour cream..

How are things going with the new diet you are following?

Heather
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,332
Heather. He will have meant that the butter is pastured, not pasteurized! It is raw.
Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 184
Thanks for that Phil.........I was surprized........
Alan A.
user 11947259
London, GB
Post #: 37
Apologies I was mistaken- green pastures HVBO is 'raw'. Thanks for feedback. I have ample supply of raw milk and cream from year round organic pasture and siledge reared cattle in Pembrokeshire at wholesale prices so the economics of that make sense. However, having looked into the centrifuge and it's cooling element that's quite a serious piece of lab kit to own or have access to. I'm going to buy from green pastures while I think a bit more about hardware, logistics and marketing of manufacture. I'm sure it would be possible to produce and bring to Market at a cheaper price but appreciate overheads andmarketing / development risks these companies have.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,333
Import taxes are also huge.
Stefan C.
user 11345230
London, GB
Post #: 65
I'm sure it would be possible to produce and bring to Market at a cheaper price but appreciate overheads andmarketing / development risks these companies have.

Thats exactly right. It's easy to look at just the raw materials of a product and then say "how much are they charging!?", but raw materials (which are actually not cheap with butter oil) are a fraction of the overall product cost.
Alan A.
user 11947259
London, GB
Post #: 38
I agree- we should be grateful that these companies are out there and 'materials costs' are not a significant part of their overhead. Point taken also from Phil that import taxes make products a lot more expensive for us than in country (and home market) of manufacture, literally its $ for £ or worse. Anyhow, I see Red21 are offering discount on vitamin butter oil etc. at WiseTraditions, unfortunately I can't make it there this time but that could be a time for people attending to stock up. In the meantime I'll ask my wife's research scientists friends in Cambridge about lab access and dairy experimentation after hours ;) !
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