Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 361
Does anyone use this gelatin? I only want to eat meat at most twice per week and I find it difficult to get bones to make my own stock; it's also difficult finding the time. Therefore I wonder if using this product would be a healthy compromise.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,704
Broth does not take too much time if you use a slow cooker and then have space to freeze it in batches. Simply throw the bones, a dash of vinegar plus water and leave it up to 24hrs. Pour everything into a bowl, into a sieve to catch the bones. Then just bottle it and put excess jars into the freezer. Our slow cooker is about 9 litres, enough for maybe two or three weeks worth. Most butchers will have tons of bones to give away as will fish mongers. You can also get them mail order, for example, from Ford Hall Farm, or many other grass fed mail order farms. You simply have to keep away from the supermarkets and will find it in independent shops, farm markets and online.

Gelatin is a great product, but does not include all the complex goodness and fats from the bone marrow. Bone marrow is over 90% saturated fat, yet gelatin is near to fat free, so you don't get all the fat soluble goodies. It is the organ that produces white blood cells, so must be of great importance! Bone marrow transplants can cure cancer, and just recently, two people were given all clear for HIV after bone marrow transplants! Yet we can consume it in beautiful stocks and sauces.

Gelatin is great, but is certainly not a substitute for broth, which becomes all the more appealing when you use it as a substitute for water when cooking any grains or pulses. We made a lovely cassoulette in the slow cooker this week with a broth reduction, gives it a lovely gravy, and a bone broth gravy is what a lot of curries would have had for example. The more I use broth the more I come to think that a life without it is not worth living!

The main suggestion I have with incorporating things like this in the routine is, focus on key things like broth and whilst incorporating something like that in your diet, drop all the other objectives, take your time, spend a few months or even a couple years getting it into your routine. Once you have got it into your routine, it becomes part of your culture and something you can pass down the generations. Incorporating these things into our cultural fabric is what will make them a sustained part of our existence, so the trick is to take time, prioritize, and enjoy the process.
Lorna
user 11805001
London, GB
Post #: 270
Hi Phil,

I've often wondered about the other ingredients in broth? Are they just for flavour? I chuck in carrot and onion if time, but rarely have celery etc?

Abel and cole sell organic chicken carcasses, 2 for £2. including liver, giblets and neck.

Lorna
Claire
user 47390302
London, GB
Post #: 75
I use great lakes but only for additional stuff, like making jelly, cold cheese cake etc..

I make broth in slow cooker and prioritise doing it as see it as one of the most beneficial foods we eat.

I use a slow cooker too but I always thought that you need to bring the broth to the boil first, skim the scum then reduce heat to low. I then transfer the broth to the slow cooker. Do others not do this? If you put it straight in the slow cooker will scum form?
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,705
I never bother skimming off the scum from the top. My personal method, I take the meat off the bones after boiling, always quite a lot, and I blend it in with the stock, making a meat / bone broth.
Claire
user 47390302
London, GB
Post #: 77
Isn't the scum full of impurities?
How long does it take for it to boil in your slow cooker? Do you initially add cold water?
"Always quite a lot" of meat or of boiling? Sorry didn't quite understand. But I'm all for learning simpler methods.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,707
Regarding the scum, not sure about impurities, there should not really be any impurities. I think it is just for aesthetics. Folk in posh restaurants like a clear broth! I sincerely recommend, for daily life, to just throw the bones in the slow cooker, leave for 12 to 24hrs, then drain through a sieve when done. I then pick through the bones, throw the meat, cartilage, marrow, etc. that has come loose and put it in the blender to add with the rest of the stock rather than throw away the protein element. When the fat solidifies at the top, you can remove it to cook your vegetables.

Some recipes want a clear broth, like for example but if you are simply using broth to cook legumes, rice, etc, to make sauces or a thicker soup, it needs less care. It is the clear broth soups that need the aesthetic treatment!
Claire
user 47390302
London, GB
Post #: 79
OK thanks.

I always struggle to eat the broth fat from beef. It forms a very thick layer and has a powerful unpleasant flavour. I always think it tastes a bit rancid and worry about eating it. I do love fat though from all other sources and methods of cooking. Just from the beef stock it doesn't taste right :-S
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