Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Organic pasteurized butter, good or bad?

Organic pasteurized butter, good or bad?

Nick
user 94237032
London, GB
Post #: 10
Butter features heavily in the guidelines for WAPF, obviously recommends raw, unpasteurized, organic/grass fed products.

I can only very rarely get raw butter and tend to bulk buy when i do.

In-between those times, is it better to have organic pasteurized butter or just not eat it at all?



Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,718
Butter is less damaged by heat treating than milk. High quality grass fed butter is therefore going to beneficial albeit not as beneficial as raw but, we are not all millionaires so cannot necessarily afford raw butter for all our butter needs. I find that the Jersey and Guernsey butter is a good alternative. You can now get unpasteurised French butter in Waitrose, though we have not yet determined whether it is thermalised. Watch out for brands like Kerrygold that claim to be more spreadable, they are I believe homogenised now.

We do have a list of raw butter sources here:
http://www.meetup.com...­
lesley from K.
user 57284862
London, GB
Post #: 29
Waitrose raw butter - nope, I fear they only offered this for a fairly short time.
Kerrygold: they're now doing something weird to it to make it 'spreadable' from the fridge, so I've given up on that until I find out exactly what their "gentle heating process" really is - but it was tasty.
Waitrose do sell a guernsey butter that's rather nice, but pricey at £1.80/250gms.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,721
Lesley, you may find that some Waitrose stores stock it, whilst others do not. Go to customer services and make a request. Incidentally, I think the Guernsey butter is extremely cheap due to the vast difference in quality between it and many other brands. It is grass fed, from heritage breeds, grazing top quality land in the Channel Islands. I think proximity to the sea will provide extra iodine and other minerals. Shame it isn't raw, but particularly if you are using it for cooking, a great alternative until we have good supply of raw butter, as with the Jersey butter seen elsewhere.

I think that the Kerrygold is more spreadable due to some kind of homogenization technology. Steer well clear. I think many of the Irish butters are doing this now.
Nick
user 94237032
London, GB
Post #: 11
Thanks guys.

i've just been using waitrose and sainsburys organic butter (non salted) on the occasion I do use it.

Will check out the jersey stuff.

As mentioned I've brought raw from farmers markets, yes expensive, but also, to me taste like cheese, but not in a good way. smile

Rebecca
user 74811052
High Wycombe, GB
Post #: 2
Excuse my ignorance but how would they be able to make cream or butter if the milk is homogenised? My understanding is that homogenisation breaks up the fat particles into much smaller molecules so they are evenly distributed in the milk, so how would they then make cream or butter out of it?
lesley from K.
user 57284862
London, GB
Post #: 39
Excuse my ignorance but how would they be able to make cream or butter if the milk is homogenised? My understanding is that homogenisation breaks up the fat particles into much smaller molecules so they are evenly distributed in the milk, so how would they then make cream or butter out of it?
That's an interesting question, but they are 2 different products (cream and butter). You're correct about the homogenisation process. but you make butter out of double cream (not single, and probably not whipping (tried with single, doesn't work, haven't tried with whipping) and it works whether its pasteurised or raw.
The double cream isn't labelled 'homogenised', yup.
So I think you have to go back a step - you make butter with cream, which can't be homogenised, because its cream and not milk.
You sell milk homogenised, if you want to do this to it.
2 different processes for 2 different products. But of course cream isn't 'made' it rises to the surface of the milk as it stands after the milking. Re-reading what I've written, I understand it, but I'm not sure if its readily understandable by anyone else! So sorry.
Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 371
Hi

As some of this thread is dated what is the current situation on quality butter please? Hooks is too expensive and while I looked in Waitrose this evening I couldnt find any that said the cows.were grass fed. Also can anyone recommend a source of grass fed ghee please?
lesley from K.
user 57284862
London, GB
Post #: 40
Difficult, to put it in a word.
Waitrose: stopped doing raw butter (neither instore nor online nor to order), but do organic.
Kerrygold - still pushing the 'spreadable' version, I avoid that like plague.
Anchor - actually now made in the UK by Arla (the dairy "super-manufacturer"), likely still to be grass-fed, but personally I wouldn't put another penny in Arla's pocket.
I use organic when I can afford it, but make ghee from 'value' butter. Taste wise though, President for me beats all the others, heaven knows why (I'd like to, anyone know?)
Being in Kent, I also drive miles when I have time for the bio-dynamic cream from Plawhatch/Tabletop Farm, or the place next to Northiam (Redlays?) and stock up, making my own butter and freezing it in 4oz packs.
Its all a balancing game - I'm very lucky in having raw goats milk on my doorstep, so I figure a little less than perfect butter is balanced out by the raw goats milk.
Good luck.
BTW - if you do a 'booze cruise' you seem to be able to get raw butter, 'beurre cru', in France, its done by the D'Isigny co-op and they're based in the Pas de Calais. I haven't tried in Calais, but have slightly further afield and its in the 'normal' supermarkets, so maybe it is in Calais too.
Good luck.
Ghee is easily made using butter (google it, really really easy) - just use the best you have to hand and don't stress too much while keeping an eye on what's happenning.
Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 372
Thank you Lesley. I may get Hurdlebrooks at the weekend it's not organic or raw but looks wonderfully yellow in the summer.
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