Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Next best to raw milk?

Next best to raw milk?

Tosin
user 110366572
London, GB
Post #: 13
I've been making my own yogurt for sometime and ave always used Duchy Originals organic milk. It's pasteurised but unhomogenised. My husband feels that the gold top jersey milk is much better but I'm partial to duchy because its organic. So for the purpose of yogurt making which do you guys think is more uperior and meets the requirements of WAPF?
Samuel
user 119255482
London, GB
Post #: 6
Personally, i am more partial to the gold-top from Jersey/Guernsey cows as most other commercial milk is often from Holstein (best avoided). Though other milk from Shorthorn, Ayrshire and other are best avoided.

That being said, organic is probably best.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,749
I would disagree about avoiding all Holstein. The Holstein hybrids that are almost entirely A1 milk are unique to confined agriculture facilities in USA and similar, and do not survive on grass. If your farmer is grazing his cows, with older varieties of Holstein, they can be a good option. I would also say that Shorthorn and Ayrshire are fine breeds. The full fat milk from Dutchy is from a pedigree Ayrshire herd, and are a great option for when you seek a compromise that is grass fed, pasteurised, but unhomogenised. I know people in Scotland who cannot afford raw milk deliveries from England who use it to make kefir, and that is quite a good compromise.

As Prof Ton Baars pointed out in his lecture to our last conference, the feed and amount of grass feeding is the principle issue, and breed is something you can consider once you have got grass fed. His main issue was high input (additional grains), vs low input (principally grass based). He would suggest that low input grass based with a Holstein would be better than high input conventional with a Jersey cow.

Here is Ton's talk:
http://vimeo.com/onde...­
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,750
To answer Tosin, it really is based on your preference. Certainly, most gold top comes from grass based herds. You could always go for a compromise, where you top up your organic Dutchy by mixing in some organic cream! See if it comes out similar to gold top. Yes, it is a shame there are no branded organic gold top brands. The top problem with conventional milk of any breed, is that they are likely to use GMO soya in the feed, but since Jersey's and Guernseys are bred more for grazing, it would be less of a problem with them.
Lorna
user 11805001
London, GB
Post #: 271
Abel and Cole do an organic guernsey, they also sell Brown cow yoghurt which is a good one, organic, and made from gently pasteurised unhomogenised guernsey milk.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,751
Lorna. Do you have details of what they mean by "gently" pasteurised? Certainly, from my knowledge, there is a rapid pasteurisation process where the milk is heated quickly by electric plates, and then rapidly cooled. There is also the process where you bring it up to heat in the equivalent of a pan, but the milk has to be kept at the high temperature for a longer period to qualify for pasteurisation. The latter, manual procedure is more preferable for yogurt, which for consistency tends to require heating because the enzymes in raw milk compete with the yogurt culture.

For more information on the heat or not debate for yogurt, read the following article:

To Heat or Not To Heat: A Yogurt Question - Weston A Price ...
http://www.westonapri...­
Lorna
user 11805001
London, GB
Post #: 272
No, but when I emailed them to ask if the milk was homogenized they gave a full reply, and then changed their packaging and website. Might be worth asking?
Ella I.
user 70109622
London, GB
Post #: 1
Hi,

Which starter culture/grain do you use to make the yoghurt/kefir. I am looking for one with enzymes ideally to add in what has been lost.
Tim
user 28774772
London, GB
Post #: 66
Thought id add to the discussion. I remember watching a youtube video of Dr John explaining alternatives to raw milk and he concluded either non homogenized or alternatively skimmed milk that had been previously boiled.

His concern was that pasturisation makes the proteins hard to digest and boiling it seems to help with digesting the proteins (i made notes, cant recall why/how this would aid). He also recommended boiling all milk raw or otherwise but can't recall why that either.

Another method would be to use organic heavy whipping cream as this has not been homogenized so the fat has not been affected.
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