Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Light olive oil

Light olive oil

Tosin
user 110366572
London, GB
Post #: 16
Is this allowed according to the WAPF guidelines? I'm talking about the light coloured flavourless olive oil for roasting and cooking (as opposed to extra virgin)

Also, what would be the best brand olive oil to get? I hear that there's a lot of adulterated olive oil out there...
Phillippa L.
user 72246762
Ventnor, GB
Post #: 11
I am not sure about the WAPF take on light olive oil, but it is generally thought to have been 'chemically scrubbed'! I found the following article had useful information about oils and their nutritional benefits.
http://www.foodmatter...­
Tosin
user 110366572
London, GB
Post #: 17
Yes I did some research and I might as well be using corn oil for all the good this light olive oil is doing me! Only problem now is figuring out which one to choose!
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,734
WAPF do not particularly recommend cooking with any olive oil. It can be fine at low temperatures, but the more saturated fats are better at higher temps. Goose fat, drippings, lard, etc. butter or ideally ghee and also coconut oil. Extra Virgin olive oil is good on salads, raw. Many of its benefits are destroyed with heat include a high enzyme content.
Tosin
user 110366572
London, GB
Post #: 18
Thanks Philip. Which brand of extra virgin olive oil would you recommend for salads?
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,735
Well, I haven't done research into different brands. I would probably say that the best is the artisan small batch sources that are not branded! Without knowing any more, I look for a nice colour and a deep, rich taste, so without further research, I would find out the farming practices, whether the source uses ancient vines, chemicals, etc. or if it is conventional, high input farming. I mention ancient vines, because I understand that olive trees can live hundreds if not thousands of years, but those types are probably only in small batches from artisan sources. I would imagine that some take notice of the soil, just like with wine regions. Maybe there is somebody else here who knows some differences? Certainly, a visit to somewhere like Borough Market provides great opportunities for tasting different varieties, and to a certain extent it depends on budget, but if you do not cook with it and simply use it as a condiment and salad dressing, then because you use less of it, maybe you can afford better quality.
Tosin
user 110366572
London, GB
Post #: 21
I think I will go to Borough Market, thanks! I'm going to the Notting Hill market this Saturday so I might as well do Borough too.
Samuel
user 119255482
London, GB
Post #: 4
Understand The Labels: Extra- Virgin, Olive Oil, Light, Filtered

IOC (International Olive Committee) has certified tasting panels for olive oil, and for the oil to get the “extra virgin” mark, it has to have “appreciable levels of pepperiness, bitterness, and fruitiness, and must be free of sixteen official taste flaws, including “musty” and “fusty”—the two defective flavors that most commonly appeared in the UC Davis study. Other taste flaws are “cucumber” and “grubby.”


Virgin olive oil is made from olives that are slightly riper than those used for extra virgin oil and has a free acidity of less than 2 percent whereas extra virgin can have a free acidity of no more than 0.8 percent. Virgin should have a decent taste, but is considered a slightly defective oil. If the market wasn’t awash with fraudulent olive oils, this label might be useful, but it seems that producers have opted for labeling all the olive oil they sell “extra virgin” regardless of the ripeness of the olives used or the oils acidity level.

Refined olive oil should be pure olive oil but it will be tasteless and have a higher acidity level around 3 percent. It is usually refined with charcoal or another chemical.

Pure olive oil just means that it shouldn’t be adulterated with other nut or seed oils. It may be virgin or refined or a blend of these.

Light olive oil as been heavily refined and will have a pale color with minimal flavor. It is not extra virgin and it does not have less calories or fat. It is often used in baking. The refining process will produce oxidized fats and eliminate the antioxidants.

Moreover, as already stated: WAPF only recommends EVOO for use in salads and not for heating etc.

If i may to Infer from the OP's name that she is of African origin, she should use 'tropical oils'. I use Palm Oil (and some coconut oil) in most of my cooking and the WAPF heartily recommends it.
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