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Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Benefits of yogurt and raw cheese

Benefits of yogurt and raw cheese

emma s.
user 144432372
London, GB
Post #: 1
emma shilling
I want to know if eating pasteurised organic cheddar offers the same benefits as eating a raw cheddar that is not organic..
Also according to sally fallon using pasturised milk to make yogurt is fine because during fermentation all the goodies are put back into the yogurt that were destroyed during pasteurisation. if this happens with yogurt making i would assume it would do so with cheese making? i am interested to know if it does. (or should pasteurised cheese be avoided just like pasteurised milk? )thanks so much. i have tried to research this but am very confused.
Like · Reply · 5 days ago · Mute
Claire
user 47390302
London, GB
Post #: 128
My understanding is that raw is always best.
Pasteurised yoghurt is good (far better than pasteurised milk as it will be alive with beneficial bacteria) but raw yoghurt will be even better as it will have the added benefit of being raw (some things other than bacteria that are beneficial but I can't remember what! Perhaps someone else can help out).
emma s.
user 144432372
London, GB
Post #: 3
thanks... just discovered loads of raw cheeses at waitrose....
Tim
user 28774772
London, GB
Post #: 64
thanks... just discovered loads of raw cheeses at waitrose....
If there is an option on this forum id suggest pm'ing Phil i remember him talking about a different type of pasturisation that would still allow supermarkets to call their products raw regardless.

Only one retailer that did sell true raw dairy and i have just forgot the name to it however i think it was banned eventually anyways.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,767
Hi. They cannot call it raw unless it is indeed raw, but unpasteurised products could potentially be thermalised (about 10 degrees lower than pasteurisation), or micro-filtered. I understand that has occurred more in France than here. I'd imagine it is quite a rare situation however. But for sure, if it says raw, then it is not heat treated at all.

I am not sure of the labeling requirements for this. I'd imagine most unpasteurised cheese is raw.
emma s.
user 144432372
London, GB
Post #: 4
Thanks for reply but just going back to my original question is it okay to eat pasteurised cheese or should it be avoided like pasteurised milk.? (Are enzymes re activated during cheesemaking from pasteurised milk just like yogurt is?)
Many thanks
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,768
Yes, enzymes are added when making cheese from pasteurised milk BUT, pasteurisation does cause nutrient reduction and causes some damage to the proteins, etc. partly because modern pasteurisation involves rapid heating and cooling. There is so much raw cheese on the market that there is no need to purchase pasteurised cheese in my opinion. Yogurt is very difficult because you cannot get yogurt from raw milk commercially.
emma s.
user 144432372
London, GB
Post #: 5
As I make my own yogurt from pasteurised milk but if the proteins are damaged is it wise to eat it ?
Heather B
user 13354560
London, GB
Post #: 370
I have just started using an organic cottage cheese. I thought it was meant to be healthy but it cannot be raw so maybe it's not. Does anyone have any knowledge about it please?
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