Past Meetup

Walk In North Devon

This Meetup is past

Price: £5.00 /per person
Location image of event venue

Details

Andy will be spending a few nights 10-13th Oct) at his favourite place in the UK and you are welcome to join him for a night or two and/or for this day long walk. This is the walk description lifted from the OS website and walked many times in the past by Andy who HIGHLY recommends it:

​Valley of the Rocks to Watersmeet

Start/Finish: Lynmouth

Distance: 12km / 7.5 miles (shorter route available)

Duration: 5 hours

Exmoor beckons you closer, with its broad, russet moors and steep-sided valleys dense with trees. Here the coast path hugs precipitous cliffs; it’s as if it doesn’t want to miss a trick – or a view.

And who can blame it – the shoreline plunges into a surging sea, dappled paths wind inland onto riverside trails. This walk links two of the Exmoor’s major drawcards: the Valley of the Rocks and Watersmeet. You can drive to either beauty spot, but – as ever – walking the trails between them brings infinitely greater rewards.

Although we’ve shown the route as one continuous walk, it’d also be ideal as two separate hikes - either spend a half day on each, or perhaps tackle them on different days.

We start and finish in the pretty port of Lynmouth, a summer-time tourist honeypot thanks to a spectacular setting between rushing rivers and soaring hills. From here you hike (or take the delightful Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway) up to the town of Lynton.

Lanes and paths lead you to the spectacular Valley of the Rocks, where towering geological formations loom up on all sides. Take in the rugged scenery here, looking out for the famously feral goats, then hike back to Lynmouth along inland trails.

After lunch in the village (try the Bath Hotel’s Ancient Mariner bar), chart the course of the East Lyn as it cascades through a dramatic river gorge to Watersmeet.

At this magical spot hunt out waterfalls and the National Trust tea room. From here you can retrace your route beside the river, or climb to 263m on the spectacular path up Myrtleberry Cleave. It’s gorgeous either way.

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