• The Rebel by Albert Camus

    Nicola's Books

    $1.00

    We will be discussing, "The Rebel" by Albert Camus. Overview from Wikipedia: The Rebel (French: L'Homme révolté) is a 1951 book-length essay by Albert Camus, which treats both the metaphysical and the historical development of rebellion and revolution in societies, especially Western Europe. Camus relates writers and artists as diverse as Epicurus and Lucretius, the Marquis de Sade, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, Max Stirner, André Breton, and others in an integrated, historical portrait of man in revolt. Examining both rebellion and revolt, which may be seen as the same phenomenon in personal and social frames, Camus examines several 'countercultural' figures and movements from the history of Western thought and art, noting the importance of each in the overall development of revolutionary thought and philosophy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rebel_(book)

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  • The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

    Nicola's Books

    $1.00

    We will be discussing, "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness" by Michelle Alexander. Overview from Wikipedia: Though the conventional point of view holds that racial discrimination mostly ended with the civil rights movement reforms of the 1960s, Alexander posits that the U.S. criminal justice system uses the War on Drugs as a primary tool for enforcing traditional, as well as new, modes of discrimination and oppression. These new modes of racism have led to not only the highest rate of incarceration in the world, but also a disproportionately large rate of imprisonment for African American men. Were present trends to continue, Alexander writes, the United States will imprison one-third of its African American population. When combined with the fact that whites are more likely to commit drug crimes than people of color, the issue becomes clear for Alexander: "The primary targets of [the penal system's] control can be defined largely by race." This, ultimately, leads Alexander to believe that mass incarceration is "a stunningly comprehensive and well-disguised system of racialized social control that functions in a manner strikingly similar to Jim Crow"... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_Jim_Crow

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  • Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

    Biggby Coffee

    $1.00

    We'll be reading Sapiens and getting together at Biggby's to discuss. You are welcome to come if you don't finish the book, just know that we will discuss the whole book. I don't think "spoilers" apply to this book, but want to let you know just in case. What to expect at this meetup: Come a few minutes early and grab a drink and a chair We'll be the group sitting in a circle with copies of the book of the month We start with a few announcements Collect $1 cash from everyone (to support meetup fees) Ask the group a few questions to get the conversation going We stay on topic and make an effort to let everyone participate if they want to. In Sapiens, Dr Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power ... and our future.

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